Pacing in Connection with the Themes

Use this forum to discuss the February 2018 Book of the Month, "The Reel Sisters" by Michelle Cummings.
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Pacing in Connection with the Themes

Post by bookowlie » 02 Feb 2018, 13:55

I thought the book was slow paced for a variety of reasons - the use of five alternating perspectives, five equally main characters as opposed by one or two, the detailed descriptions of fly fishing, etc. Personally, I thought the story would have worked better with a little less detail. The overall slow pace fit well with the concept of R & R weekends away and the nature of the sport. Did the pace fit well with the story's themes and why? Would you have liked a different format to the story or a different pace, and why?
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Post by kandscreeley » 05 Feb 2018, 11:09

I think I'm more of a fan of either telling the story from one person's perspective or an omniscient type narrator. To me, when you have 5 people's perspectives such as this, it's hard to keep straight who each person is. Which person liked this and which one works for that company. I think you could still have a slow pace and have one narrator.
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Post by Miriam Molina » 05 Feb 2018, 16:06

I enjoyed the different perspectives shown. This style allowed me to connect with each character and relate her to my women friends. I realized how blessed I am to have them.

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Post by bookowlie » 06 Feb 2018, 00:26

Miriam Molina wrote:
05 Feb 2018, 16:06
I enjoyed the different perspectives shown. This style allowed me to connect with each character and relate her to my women friends. I realized how blessed I am to have them.
Miriam, I agree that it was easier to form a bond with each character through the first person perspectives. Still, this format dramatically slowed the pace for me. At some points, I was impatient to get on with specific characters' storylines rather than first wading through four other points of view.
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Post by Miriam Molina » 06 Feb 2018, 03:09

Perhaps I didn't mind the wading and waiting because of the soaps that I watch, LOL! Those soaps keep you hanging by a thin strand; they teach you patience.

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Post by bookowlie » 08 Feb 2018, 13:13

Miriam Molina wrote:
06 Feb 2018, 03:09
Perhaps I didn't mind the wading and waiting because of the soaps that I watch, LOL! Those soaps keep you hanging by a thin strand; they teach you patience.
:) Soap operas do require patience. A plotline can stretch out endlessly. Compared to soap operas, this book had a relatively short resolution.
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Post by CommMayo » 08 Feb 2018, 14:21

bookowlie wrote:
06 Feb 2018, 00:26
Miriam Molina wrote:
05 Feb 2018, 16:06
I enjoyed the different perspectives shown. This style allowed me to connect with each character and relate her to my women friends. I realized how blessed I am to have them.
Miriam, I agree that it was easier to form a bond with each character through the first person perspectives. Still, this format dramatically slowed the pace for me. At some points, I was impatient to get on with specific characters' storylines rather than first wading through four other points of view.
It kind of reminded me of J.R. Ward's writing style. She has a series where she ends up writing from the perspective of 20 or more characters. I think it works better in a long series where you can be introduced to people slowly, as opposed to being hit with 5 different voices from the start.

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Post by Cotwani » 08 Feb 2018, 16:51

CommMayo wrote:
08 Feb 2018, 14:21

It kind of reminded me of J.R. Ward's writing style. She has a series where she ends up writing from the perspective of 20 or more characters. I think it works better in a long series where you can be introduced to people slowly, as opposed to being hit with 5 different voices from the start.
I have read some of J.R Ward's books and now that you mention it, I remember one perspective can leave you on a cliffhanger but the ensuing ones involve you in so much drama you forget the cliffhanger until she picks the perspective much later on! All in all, enjoyable.

The Reel Sisters could have had the same effect if there had been more action/drama in the different perspectives. Although it wasn't so bad once I got the drift, the timelines between the different perspectives were sometimes confusing.

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Post by CommMayo » 08 Feb 2018, 16:58

Cotwani wrote:
08 Feb 2018, 16:51
CommMayo wrote:
08 Feb 2018, 14:21
I have read some of J.R Ward's books and now that you mention it, I remember one perspective can leave you on a cliffhanger but the ensuing ones involve you in so much drama you forget the cliffhanger until she picks the perspective much later on! All in all, enjoyable.
That is a perfect summary of how J.R. Ward does it! She changes perspective and you think, "Noooooo!" and then you forget all about the cliffhanger until she creates another cliffhanger before going back to the prior one! I think you have to really love a book and the characters to put up with a lot of that. For me, the Black Dagger Brotherhood series is totally worth it :D I had trouble getting so invested into the characters in this book.

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Post by CatInTheHat » 09 Feb 2018, 17:21

I liked it at times, as the first person perspectives were interesting. At other times, I just wanted to know what was happening with the overall storyline.
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Post by bookowlie » 12 Feb 2018, 18:03

CatInTheHat wrote:
09 Feb 2018, 17:21
I liked it at times, as the first person perspectives were interesting. At other times, I just wanted to know what was happening with the overall storyline.
I know what you mean. It's true that the switches in first person point of view made me feel like I knew each of them so well. However, I did get impatient for the plot to move forward. It just felt like each scene could have been a little shorter.
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Post by CommMayo » 13 Feb 2018, 11:02

bookowlie wrote:
12 Feb 2018, 18:03
CatInTheHat wrote:
09 Feb 2018, 17:21
I liked it at times, as the first person perspectives were interesting. At other times, I just wanted to know what was happening with the overall storyline.
I know what you mean. It's true that the switches in first person point of view made me feel like I knew each of them so well. However, I did get impatient for the plot to move forward. It just felt like each scene could have been a little shorter.
I agree. It kind of started to become a juggling act with all of the characters.

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Post by Kieran_Obrien » 21 Feb 2018, 04:12

I'd never thought of this but I suppose the slow pace does thematically link with the slow pace of fly fishing... that doesn't make it interesting though!
Pacing was a huge issue for me, even during the heightened events near the end I was still screaming at the book to hurry up. Having to endure every scene multiple times from multiple perspectives was maddening sometimes 😅

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Post by Yolimari » 21 Feb 2018, 06:08

I was not bothered at all by the pace of the story. It was joy for me to read such a tranquil story. I think the pace matched very well with the natural and sublime setting of the story in Colorado. As for the fly fishing details, I thought I was going to be bored. Surprisingly, I was not. I got into its organic ambience.
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Post by CommMayo » 21 Feb 2018, 12:35

Yolimari wrote:
21 Feb 2018, 06:08
I was not bothered at all by the pace of the story. It was joy for me to read such a tranquil story. I think the pace matched very well with the natural and sublime setting of the story in Colorado. As for the fly fishing details, I thought I was going to be bored. Surprisingly, I was not. I got into its organic ambience.
Maybe you have found your next hobby! :D

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