American Foods

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Lil Reads
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Re: American Foods

Post by Lil Reads » 12 Jul 2018, 00:20

I'm an American and I have to go with the crowd here - corn dogs, fried chicken, and jello.

For everyone who has a bad Jello salad experience, I really recommend not looking through American cookbooks from the 1950s. Victorian England may have started the weird Jello trend, but America in the 1950s sort of raised it to an art form. It really is more an art form than anything else. To be fair, savory Jello was available and some of the Jello salads with meat and savory Jello might have been less disgusting.

I think some regional dishes, such as Scrapple, grits, avocado, bacon wrapped anything, and similar are really American. I also think fusion cuisines should be considered American.
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Eryn Bradshaw
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Post by Eryn Bradshaw » 12 Jul 2018, 07:30

I'm American, but I live in Ireland. Anything sweet and salty is very American. When I told my husband about PB&J sandwiches, he looked at me like I was nuts. He said he genuinely believed it was a joke and there was no way people could like it. Also, sweet potato casserole with marshmallows on top was too sweet for his family (except his grandad who loves sweets) when I made it one year for Christmas. I remember a conversation with my mother-in-law who talked about how she went to Seattle and at breakfast, there was always something sweet on her plate for breakfast, even if it was a savory breakfast.

Pumpkin spice is a huge thing I miss in the fall. I practically begged my mom to send me anything pumpkin spice last fall because I missed it so much. Pumpkin pie is hard to get, but there's a man who owns a cafe in town and he serves pumpkin pie. His wife is American, so she makes American styled desserts for the cafe. Also pancakes are different out here. Not sure if it's like this in the rest of Europe, but the pancakes they have here are almost like crepes, but not quite. When I go to the store, I can buy specifically "American Pancakes" that are fluffy, but I tend to just make my own from scratch.

God, the list can go on and on. I just got a package from home today, and there was a box of Cheez-Its inside it. I'm going to happily devour those today.
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juliamenez
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Post by juliamenez » Today, 09:41

American nationality.

I love BBQ, boxed Mac and cheese, and dinner rolls! Really, anything that resembles Thanksgiving side dishes holds a special place in my stomach.

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StarkidStarling
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Post by StarkidStarling » Today, 09:47

Lil Reads wrote:
12 Jul 2018, 00:20
I'm an American and I have to go with the crowd here - corn dogs, fried chicken, and jello.

For everyone who has a bad Jello salad experience, I really recommend not looking through American cookbooks from the 1950s. Victorian England may have started the weird Jello trend, but America in the 1950s sort of raised it to an art form. It really is more an art form than anything else. To be fair, savory Jello was available and some of the Jello salads with meat and savory Jello might have been less disgusting.

I think some regional dishes, such as Scrapple, grits, avocado, bacon wrapped anything, and similar are really American. I also think fusion cuisines should be considered American.
I really want to look through one of those cookbooks now! Poodle Skirts and Jello Salads...the 50s were a wild time!

What's Scrapple? I've never even heard of it.

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