Should a book contain words that are challenging to readers?

Discuss the May 2017 Book of the Month, Farmer Beau's Farm by Kathleen Geiger.

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ritah
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Re: Should a book contain words that are challenging to read

Post by ritah » 24 Jul 2017, 13:34

It all boils down to the amount. A few here and there would be great for improving readers vocabulary whilst too many challenging words could prove distracting to the reader.

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Post by Richard Mudd » 25 Jul 2017, 12:07

Absolutely yes, otherwise unless we read dictionaries in our spare time, how would our vocabularies be enlarged. Quite apart from that the written word is a more friendly medium in which to encounter new words, one can set the book aside and find out the meaning, imagine doing that in a verbal exchange. Ignoring the potential for embarrassment in that situation, for both parties, what a conversation killer it would be, unless the user was one of those point scorers we sometimes come across, straining to construct a meaningful sentence including some obscure word or two.
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Post by stalliongirlke » 25 Jul 2017, 14:35

I think the words should be there but the word's shouldn't be used too much as to negate the purpose of writing the book.

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Post by Excitedreads » 25 Jul 2017, 15:22

The challenge in introducing new, more complexed and unfamiliar words to a child's vocabulary is more so knowing what audience the novelmis targetting. For example, my little sister is dyslexic and in trying to overcome it, even though she is years beyond her reading capabilities, we've had to search for books that are suited to her actual reading level or grade level. Each level she moves up does challenge her, but it can never be so challenging that she becomes frustrated trying to read the book
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Post by Ama Idim » 26 Jul 2017, 02:12

Yes...a book should contain challenging words for both the younger and older audience. As it is... It helps with knowing new words but can still be kept simple
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Post by Kb3ck » 26 Jul 2017, 20:18

I absolutely think that books should contain some challenging words. Part of reading is to learn and grow as a person. Challenging words increase the reader's vocabulary which means the reader is expanding their knowledge.
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Post by MoseyProse » 26 Jul 2017, 20:24

Certainly! I think one of the best ways to learn new words is by reading them in the context of a sentence in a book. It's how I've learnt many new words.
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Post by Onyinyechukwu » 26 Jul 2017, 22:04

Most of the words I learnt as a child were not learnt by consciously opening the pages of a dictionary. I learnt most words because of the settings they were used in, no matter how complex they were, and every time without fail when I cross-checked those words or was asked for their meanings, I had the right answer. I feel that challenging words are essential for children to build their vocabulary.

On the other hand, as an adult, although I would welcome challenging words, I don't appreciate when they are so much as to interrupt my reading flow because I have to check the meaning of so many words. It makes reading burdensome, except the sole purpose is improving my vocabulary.
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Post by Bluecobia » 20 Aug 2017, 18:57

I have found that having a few unknown words in a story is a good teaching tool. I like helping my grand daughter that way.
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Post by Christina Rose » 22 Aug 2017, 22:40

I agree with all others - when not overdone, the use of challenging words serves to improve one's vocabulary, whether the reader is an adult or a child.

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Post by V_bansal2912 » 20 Sep 2017, 00:39

Challenging words are one of the perks of reading. It helps our vocabulary and makes us challenge to keep brushing up on our words.

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Post by eelavahs-jay » 28 Sep 2017, 13:53

There should definitely be challenging words in books. That is how children (and adults) expand their vocabularies. If we aren't learning anything at all from our readings then what is the point?

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Post by Anjum » 25 Nov 2017, 05:44

I think challenging words can help you to expand your vocabulary and imagination. So it is good for children to learn new words through interesting stories.
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Post by inaramid » 15 Dec 2017, 05:59

Of course. But not too many, I hope. I wonder if it's going to be a little different for non-English speaking youngsters, although being children, they tend to absorb a lot of things very quickly. My friend's daughter speaks English with an Aussie accent just by watching YouTube. Her vocabulary is quite amazing too. I was floored when she asked me how to "devour" a sandwich.

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Post by Mailis » 10 Feb 2018, 03:56

Oh yes they should. But they shouldn't be overwhelming and thrown in there to just show how eloquent the author is at every turn. They should add color to the story and characters. Also whenever I'm reading a goodnight story and it contains words that my kiddo does not understand yet, it is quite fun to try and find synonyms for different words or to try and explain concepts otherwise we might not touch in our everyday life.

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