Read-A-Long of "The Testaments" by Margaret Atwood

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gali
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Read-A-Long of "The Testaments" by Margaret Atwood

Post by gali » 13 Sep 2019, 06:24

Read-A-Long of The Testaments (The Handmaid's Tale #2) by Margaret Atwood.
In the case of good books, the point is not to see how many of them you can get through, but rather how many can get through to you." (Mortimer J. Adler)

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Post by gali » 13 Sep 2019, 12:58

@gregs317, let's discuss it here. :)

I started the book, but I have just read a few pages and don't have an opinion yet. So far it is indeed different from the first one, but the writing is good. Give it a few more chapters before you decide. I usually read the first 50-100 pages before I make up my mind. We can always quit the book if it doesn't answer our exceptions...

I loved 'A Man Called Ove' right from the start.
In the case of good books, the point is not to see how many of them you can get through, but rather how many can get through to you." (Mortimer J. Adler)

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Post by gregs317 » 15 Sep 2019, 13:19

Hi, sorry I haven't checked in sooner. However, I have been reading the book. It took me a second to understand how the 3-narrators thing works. I have been enjoying the book so far - it's just a matter of remembering who each of the characters is. But it's getting easier.

I don't know how fast you like to read, but I am reading every night and sometimes during the day, as well. Normally, I read at night only, so you can see that his book has me hooked.

I have finished chapter 15 so far. So please go ahead and start a discussion about anything you wish, regarding the storyline. I like learning more about Aunt Lydia and the history of various families. I will wait for your response now. ttyl

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Post by gali » 15 Sep 2019, 13:59

I am about to start chapter 14 and hope to catch up with you tonight. I also read every night and sometimes during the day, depending on my time. I am also hooked by the tale. Atwood sure knows how to write!

The three narrators confused me as well at first, but I think I got the hang of it. I like that the three supplement each other. The first book ended with the fall of Gilead, so I was surprised at first that the book started with Gilead (as told by Aunt Lydia). She is a complex character and it is interesting to read her views on things.

From the three narrators, which one is your favorite: Aunt Lydia, the girl in Gilead, or the Canadian girl? I like them all, but I find the story of the Canadian girl the most interesting, especially after the murder of her parents. Their connection to the resistance group is intriguing. I suspect that the girl is adopted and wonder who her true mother is (if she is adopted).
In the case of good books, the point is not to see how many of them you can get through, but rather how many can get through to you." (Mortimer J. Adler)

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Post by gregs317 » 15 Sep 2019, 17:31

It's hard to say which of the three narrators is my favorite, but I think Aunt Lydia. I like that she seems to have a different point of view now she is getting closer to being elderly.

It's like she was this strong, powerful female figure in the male-dominated world of Gilead. But now that the regime's power is being questioned or maybe even dismantled, she seems to find herself fighting for her safety and freedom. I feel badly for her, to a certain degree.

I agree Margaret Atwood is an amazing author. I couldn't imagine writing a book like this, with many points of view, and representing the voices of each character.

I will post again in a day or 2, if that works for you.

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Post by gali » 15 Sep 2019, 23:10

gregs317 wrote:
15 Sep 2019, 17:31
It's hard to say which of the three narrators is my favorite, but I think Aunt Lydia. I like that she seems to have a different point of view now she is getting closer to being elderly.

It's like she was this strong, powerful female figure in the male-dominated world of Gilead. But now that the regime's power is being questioned or maybe even dismantled, she seems to find herself fighting for her safety and freedom. I feel badly for her, to a certain degree.

I agree Margaret Atwood is an amazing author. I couldn't imagine writing a book like this, with many points of view, and representing the voices of each character.

I will post again in a day or 2, if that works for you.
I agree with you.

It will be interesting to see how Gilead fell.

The scene where the men came to the office of Aunt Lydia (who was a judge when it all started) to take the women away gave me the chills. Some of the descriptions in the book are not that far off from reality. Sadly, in some countries, that's how women are treated.

Sure, post whenever you want. :)
In the case of good books, the point is not to see how many of them you can get through, but rather how many can get through to you." (Mortimer J. Adler)

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Post by gregs317 » Today, 09:45

Hello, just checking in quick. I have finished chapter 39, and will start chapter 40 today. Honestly, I have never read a book this fast before. It's a real rush!

I love how the storyline is progressing. It seems to be picking up pretty quickly now. I like learning about the school girls - how they lack the basic abilities of reading/writing/knowledge of local geography etc.

I'm happy to see Becka and Agnes becoming aunts to escape a dreadful marriage. Aunt Lydia's progression is moving along nicely also. The secrets of Ardua Hall are fascinating - I love that kind of stuff, about hidden rooms, secret files etc. Gee, I wonder why men are banned from entering there unaccompanied. Could you possibly imagine why? lol

And of course Paula. I think we all gotta love to hate her.

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Post by gali » Today, 13:52

I am about to finish chapter 30 and enjoy it very much. I will read some more tonight.

I kind of guessed that Canadian girl was the baby Nicole. Have you seen it coming?

I didn't reach the section that tells about Becka and Agnes becoming aunts yet, but I am happy to know they escaped their fate.

I love how the thee POV come together!

lol I can guess why the men can't enter unaccompanied all too well... :)

Paula is just awful, and the father isn't that likable either!

I was worried the book won't be good as the first one due to some negative reviews about it online. I am glad to find they were wrong. The book is different from the first one but just as good, and I like that it gives us the inner workings of Gilead.
In the case of good books, the point is not to see how many of them you can get through, but rather how many can get through to you." (Mortimer J. Adler)

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