The Native Americans angle

Discuss the January 2016 book of the month For the Love of Suzanne by Kristi Hudecek-Ashwill.
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gali
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The Native Americans angle

Post by gali » 01 Jan 2016, 11:44

What did you think about the incorporation of the Native Americans history into the story? I found it very interesting, and I emphasized with their plight. I thought it fit well with the plot, and it also helped to explain the way Cody acted.
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Post by bookowlie » 02 Jan 2016, 10:35

I liked the Native American historical angle and learned something about a period I didn't know much about. I agree that it feel in the plot, but the violence and treatment of women was a harsh subject to read about.

-- 02 Jan 2016, 20:59 --

Note to self...don't type comments on the tablet! Between the auto-correct and the touch-tone keyboard, the errors become embarrassing. :) My previous post should read "I agree that it fit well in the plot" - I don't know where "it feel in the plot" came from. It felt out of the sky onto the tablet screen - ha ha ha.
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Post by L_Therese » 05 Jan 2016, 19:02

I thought it was interesting to incorporate the Native American part of history, but I wish it could have been done more thoroughly. The portrayal seemed too simplified with precious little real cultural elements. The story would have been so much richer if the actual culture was used as a contrast to the local dominant culture. Another point I'd raise is that Cody Black Fox refers to the Native Americans as "Indians". Historically speaking, though the people at the fort and surrounding areas would have been using that term (possibly among others), anyone connected to the Native American people would have referred to them by the name of their Nation - whichever one it was.

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Post by gali » 05 Jan 2016, 22:58

bookowlie wrote:I liked the Native American historical angle and learned something about a period I didn't know much about. I agree that it feel in the plot, but the violence and treatment of women was a harsh subject to read about.

-- 02 Jan 2016, 20:59 --

Note to self...don't type comments on the tablet! Between the auto-correct and the touch-tone keyboard, the errors become embarrassing. :) My previous post should read "I agree that it fit well in the plot" - I don't know where "it feel in the plot" came from. It felt out of the sky onto the tablet screen - ha ha ha.
I agree.

lol autho-correct is bothersome! :)

-- January 6th, 2016, 6:00 am --
L_Therese wrote:I thought it was interesting to incorporate the Native American part of history, but I wish it could have been done more thoroughly. The portrayal seemed too simplified with precious little real cultural elements. The story would have been so much richer if the actual culture was used as a contrast to the local dominant culture. Another point I'd raise is that Cody Black Fox refers to the Native Americans as "Indians". Historically speaking, though the people at the fort and surrounding areas would have been using that term (possibly among others), anyone connected to the Native American people would have referred to them by the name of their Nation - whichever one it was.
Good points. Nonetheless, I enjoyed the story as it was.
In the case of good books, the point is not to see how many of them you can get through, but rather how many can get through to you." (Mortimer J. Adler)

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Post by bookowlie » 11 Jan 2016, 10:28

L_Therese wrote:I thought it was interesting to incorporate the Native American part of history, but I wish it could have been done more thoroughly. The portrayal seemed too simplified with precious little real cultural elements. The story would have been so much richer if the actual culture was used as a contrast to the local dominant culture. Another point I'd raise is that Cody Black Fox refers to the Native Americans as "Indians". Historically speaking, though the people at the fort and surrounding areas would have been using that term (possibly among others), anyone connected to the Native American people would have referred to them by the name of their Nation - whichever one it was.
I can see your point. However, I viewed this book as predominantly a time travel/romance rather than a historical novel. It wouldn't bother me if the Native American backdrop had few real cultural elements, as you mentioned. Since the time travel turned the book into a fantasy, I didn't find it as important to have the historical elements done as thoroughly. It would have mattered to me more if the book was strictly a historical novel without the fantasy elements.
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Post by psyche » 13 Jan 2016, 14:08

It seems to me that unless the time travel was to a parallel universe, it should not affect how the historical elements are treated because the character is going back to our "real" past.
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Post by bookowlie » 13 Jan 2016, 20:46

psyche wrote:It seems to me that unless the time travel was to a parallel universe, it should not affect how the historical elements are treated because the character is going back to our "real" past.
Very true. I was just trying to bring out that there doesn't need to be as many minor historical details if the focus of the book is less of a historical novel than a romance novel with supernatural touches. That being said, I think most of the historical details in this book were accurate.
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Post by charysma_lilly » 15 Jan 2016, 14:59

The introduction of such elements was very welcomed from my point of view as well. It gives the story a little more credibility if I may say so. I would also have liked to see more of the traditions depicted in the book, but probably it would have borred some other readers.

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Post by stoppoppingtheP » 16 Jan 2016, 07:35

psyche wrote:It seems to me that unless the time travel was to a parallel universe, it should not affect how the historical elements are treated because the character is going back to our "real" past.
I agree. When writing a book the author should research the historical elements of his/her story properly. This is because, even though it is a novel, readers take in that information and assume it to be a correct portrayal of history.

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Post by rssllue » 16 Jan 2016, 07:56

I agree also. Too often historical novels are taken as fact by the reader in its descriptions and portrayals of people and events from that time period in the story. I think that it is a delicate balance to insert fiction into true history for these types of novels.
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Post by DarkestbeforeDawn » 17 Jan 2016, 19:21

I feel very uneasy reading about histories and cultures that are not my own, because I feel like a lot of the time, the truth is glossed over in favor something that is a little more tolerable. The history of the Native Americans and their plight isn't really something I feel comfortable reading about in fiction unless there was extensive research involved or the author shares cultural roots.
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Post by kio » 17 Jan 2016, 22:48

gali wrote:What did you think about the incorporation of the Native Americans history into the story? I found it very interesting, and I emphasized with their plight. I thought it fit well with the plot, and it also helped to explain the way Cody acted.
It was helpful for me, since I'm not that familiar with some parts of Native American History. I feel like it only partially explained Cody's behavior, however. Shouldn't they have adapted or evolved in 155 years? the honor thing just didn't quite work for me. I'd be curious to know if there were other underlying things I didn't catch in there or maybe I'm just not as familiar with Native American present culture (both very possible.)
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Post by kimmyschemy06 » 19 Jan 2016, 06:34

I love stories about Native Americans and honestly I wouldn't know if the book has been accurate with regards to the culture. Everything I know about Native Americans is from story books and films which are mostly fiction, so, I just accepted whatever was said in the book.

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Post by CzechTigg » 19 Jan 2016, 11:50

I have a little experience of encountering descendants of Native Americans who were very hospitable, when my family visited Arizona for several days. I first really became aware of the deplorable treatment they had to face in the past when watching the brilliant X files story 'Anasazi/ The Blessing Ways/ Paper Clip'.
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Post by TangledinText » 20 Jan 2016, 16:13

I enjoyed the introduction and history provided with the Native American angle and love when new things are introduced.
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