Banning sugary or unhealthy foods for children?

Discuss the March 2016 Eating Bull by Carrie Rubin.

(Note, Carrie Rubin's previous book The Seneca Scourge was book of the month in December 2012. :) )
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CLRogers90
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Re: Banning sugary or unhealthy foods for children?

Post by CLRogers90 » 10 Apr 2016, 23:57

I think that banning sugary foods from children entirely might be taking things a bit too far. I do feel, however, like we should be better moderating what our children eat, both on a personal and manufacturing level.
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Post by Vermont Reviews » 11 Apr 2016, 21:37

I know that in Vermont they have started to tax sugar laden drinks to make people aware that they are consuming way too much sugar. Also the schools have restructured the menu for school lunches and tried to make them more healthy.
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Post by Prisaneify » 12 Apr 2016, 15:40

I don't think banning everything is the answer. Just look at prohibition! The demand was so strong that people made it in their own basements. It wasn't regulated at all. It didn't have to fit a health standard or use good ingredients. At least by having them available you can teach the important life lesson of moderation and show the results of what happens when you don't use moderation. We can't become a society that has to have a rule for us to do anything for ourselves.
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Post by rssllue » 23 Apr 2016, 23:46

I think that it will always be ultimately up to the individual to make wise decisions when it comes to the food and drink that are consumed. And until said individual is old enough to informedly make this choice on their own, it is up to his or her mother and father to be the guiding principle for these decisions. The government is definitely not the answer to tell us how and what to eat or drink as a society.
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Post by lmoses » 24 Apr 2016, 00:41

It is so hard deciding how to solve a problem that revolves around something vital to living: food. Any other substance that is regulated (drugs and alcohol) the body can survive without, but you cannot survive around food. No one can tell another person what they can and cannot eat, they can only provide a suggestion and hope that the person makes the right choices. People also become addicted to food, but you cannot tell the person "don't eat again" like you would tell an alcoholic "don't drink." That is not real. To me the biggest way to make a change is ensure that people have information about healthy eating habits and access to nutritious food.
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Post by V_bansal2912 » 25 Apr 2016, 04:32

I think banning is not the right way to go. It is more about showing your kids how to control and live a healthy life by setting yourself as an example. kids learns from their parents, so if we as parents set right examples, by eating healthy and excersizing then that will work much better than any kind of regulations enforced.

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Post by Vermont Reviews » 25 Apr 2016, 06:17

V_bansal2912 wrote:I think banning is not the right way to go. It is more about showing your kids how to control and live a healthy life by setting yourself as an example. kids learns from their parents, so if we as parents set right examples, by eating healthy and exersizing then that will work much better than any kind of regulations enforced.
I agree with this comment.
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Post by Rhoe_Marrow » 27 Apr 2016, 10:02

In some countries there are bans on certain foods that our country is currently selling. I read and article once that European countries do not sell macaroni and cheese boxes because they found harmful chemical in it that our FDA actually approved.
I personally believe that sugar is just as addicting, if not more, than cigarettes and alcohol. A part of that problem may be because it has become a socially acceptable food product. One time I tried to eliminate artificial sugar from my diet. it was a real eye opener because 1.) I realized just how much stuff has the sugar and 2.) because it was significantly harder than I thought it would be.

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Post by Veda » 27 Apr 2016, 11:16

When you read ingredients in the back of a food product, there are so many ingredients that just mask the fact that it is sugar! I don't think government banning sugary foods is a solution but I wouldn't mind seeing some amount of regulation on HOW much sugar can be used in food products along with parents and schools doing their jobs, educating kids and helping them lead healthy lives.

The problem with North American society is that everything is made with sugar whereas in other countries, there is a balance and that is key! Sugar in and of itself in moderation is not bad.. but overdosing on it is!
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Post by grace-grace13 » 27 Apr 2016, 13:20

I don't think junk food will be banned in my life time, nor do I believe that a ban on junk food is the first step. Instead, there should be regulation on the marketing and manufacturing of junk food. Big retailers of sugary food should not be allowed to advertise to children, nor should books about unhealthy diets advertised as healthy be part of the curriculum of schools. Books like "My McDonalds Diet" should not be taught in schools, nor should it be marketed towards children. I also think the issue of food deserts should be tackled before banning sugary foods.

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Post by babika1962 » 02 May 2016, 11:18

Sugar, salt and fat are staples in junk and processed foods. Candy and most yogurt drinks both have high concentrations of sugar in them. Most parents know that candy is bad for kids because of the sugar content but how many know that about yogurt drinks - especially when yogurt drinks are generally touted as being "healthy"? Same comments apply with respect to granola bars. Many have high concentrations of sugar but are schools going to ban granola bars?

You really don't know how much sugar most "healthy" foods have until you look at the labels. Where do you draw the line - or more importantly, can you? I'm just not sure that schools would be able to do it.
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Post by Paliden » 03 May 2016, 16:46

I don't think it should be banned. Personally, I feel like that is taking too much freedom away from the people. However, what I believe should be done, is that healthy food should be low in cost and bad foods (i.e. foods high in suger, or otherwise unhealthy) should cost more. As it is, you can feed your family Ramen noodles for less than a dollar, but try to buy salad and it will cost you $10. And that is if you make it yourself. The food industry is designed for money. It makes sense to have the bad foods be so cheap and the good foods so expensive. If it's all about the money. Which it is.
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Post by Sarah_Khan » 14 May 2016, 17:09

I don't think sugary foods should be banned anywhere other than an environment like a school where there are mostly children. I think we are each responsible for our own well-being and the well-being of our kids and making the government take responsibility is putting too much power in their hands.

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Post by katiesquilts » 14 May 2016, 17:15

I definitely don't think it should be banned, because sometimes sugary and fatty foods are the only kinds of foods that people are able to buy and give to their kids. (Due to lack of preparation time or money issues, since processed foods are almost always cheaper than fresh food.) However, we should definitely teach both children AND parents about diet and moderation. I also agree that things like chocolate and soda should be saved for special occasions, not things that are kept in the house regularly.

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Post by afrakes » 03 Jun 2016, 11:27

This is a topic near and dear to my heart. I grew up on white bread bologna sandwiches and chips, rarely touching fruits or vegetables. When I went to college and lived on my own, I discovered I was gluten intolerant. My body felt night-and-day different. I always think back to what it would've been like to feel healthy as a child; I think I would've been much more happy, active, and successful at athletics. Gluten obviously played a big part in how miserable I felt growing up, but it brings attention to the fact that what we put into our bodies makes a huge impact, from your mentality state to your physical abilities. My diet is now mainly fruits and vegetables, and the difference in my energy levels and happiness is immeasurable. The one thing I'm thankful for is that my lack of nutrition growing up sure made me appreciate food now! Has anyone else had a similar experience/change in their life?

-- 03 Jun 2016, 11:34 --

katiesquilts - you raise an interesting point. Areas where people can't buy proper, nutritious foods are called "food deserts," and they're a very real problem! However, instead of accepting it as is, I have seen and read about communities implementing community food gardens. Through grants, communities can plant enough fruits and vegetables to feed their families for months and, with a little hard work, years. This goes back to the old saying, "Catch a fish for a man and he'll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish and he'll eat all his life." It's a great skill for children, and a great opportunity to provide growing bodies with the proper fuel.

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