Banning sugary or unhealthy foods for children?

Discuss the March 2016 Eating Bull by Carrie Rubin.

(Note, Carrie Rubin's previous book The Seneca Scourge was book of the month in December 2012. :) )
Post Reply
User avatar
Scott
Site Admin
Posts: 3143
Joined: 31 Jul 2006, 23:00
2018 Reading Goal: 52
2017 Reading Goal: 36
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 5
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 25
Favorite Author: Voltairine de Cleyre
Currently Reading: The Woman in the Window
Bookshelf Size: 228
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-scott.html
Reading Device: B00L89V1AA
Publishing Contest Votes: 960
fav_author_id: 2660
Signature Addition: testtesttest
Location: CT

Banning sugary or unhealthy foods for children?

Post by Scott » 01 Mar 2016, 09:06

[This is a discussion topic for the March 2016 book of the month Eating Bull by Carrie Rubin.]


When it comes to cigarettes, alcohol, marijuana, or large doses of caffeine, it is generally illegal to give it to children or at least to sell it to them directly. Sugar is arguably more addictive and arguably leads to more deaths than many if not all of those other items. Do you want sugary or unhealthy foods to be banned for children in the same way? Why or why not?


***
View Eating Bull on Amazon | View Eating Bull on Bookshelves
"That virtue we appreciate is as much ours as another's. We see so much only as we possess." - Henry David Thoreau

"Non ignara mali miseris succurrere disco." Virgil, The Aeneid

User avatar
gali
Site Admin
Posts: 31521
Joined: 22 Oct 2013, 07:12
2018 Reading Goal: 100
2017 Reading Goal: 100
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 80
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 105
Favorite Author: Agatha Christie
Currently Reading: Artemis
Bookshelf Size: 1831
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-gali.html
Reading Device: B00I15SB16
fav_author_id: 2484
Location: Lost in a good book

Post by gali » 01 Mar 2016, 14:22

I am not sure about that. Perhaps some kind of laws regulating junk food consumption and marketing should be considered. Even if unhealthy foods will be banned, kids will find a way to get it. I do think that the first step is public education, and schools should not sell junk food.
In the case of good books, the point is not to see how many of them you can get through, but rather how many can get through to you." (Mortimer J. Adler)

User avatar
nkkimble1
Posts: 3
Joined: 01 Mar 2016, 14:37
Bookshelf Size: 0

Post by nkkimble1 » 01 Mar 2016, 14:56

I personally feel like at school unhealthy sugary foods should be banned, all that sugar just makes kids tired when they need to be alert. Will it create more work on the cafeteria people, of course but if for my childs health for their childs health or for their grandkids they should want to create a healthier society.

User avatar
TeaAndSpooks
Posts: 39
Joined: 04 Feb 2016, 11:03
2017 Reading Goal: 500
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 0
Favorite Book: <a href="http://forums.onlinebookclub.org/shelve ... 50187">The Girl from the Well</a>
Currently Reading: The Bionics
Bookshelf Size: 355
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-teaandspooks.html
Latest Review: "Fantasy or Reality" by Ruth Andrews Garnes
Location: Tulsa, Oklahoma

Post by TeaAndSpooks » 02 Mar 2016, 16:11

I think 'banning' it is probably not something that will ever happen in my lifetime (how would they even enforce that?). Processed junk and food additives have been around for a while. I personally try to eat organic, avoid additives and growth hormones when it comes to what I eat, and if I have kids I will definitely try to encourage that with them. But if they want a cosmic brownie every once in a while, I don't think I would tell them no. It's okay to treat yourself, but consuming junk food and fast food EVERY day is so so bad for the human body, and I wouldn't let my children do that.

User avatar
survivalgypsy
Posts: 3
Joined: 24 Feb 2016, 12:07
Currently Reading: The Way of Kings
Bookshelf Size: 12
Reading Device: B00JG8GOWU

Post by survivalgypsy » 02 Mar 2016, 18:34

Would that be enforced the same way as alcohol and tobacco? With your ID? What if you had to get regular physicals to determine your level of health, which could be stored on your card. If your BMI or cholesterol was too high, you couldn't buy the sugary treat...that's A LOT of government and establishment, though. I agree that education is the best route, as in all things.

User avatar
Greatreads
Posts: 7
Joined: 02 Mar 2016, 16:24
Bookshelf Size: 0
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-greatreads.html

Post by Greatreads » 02 Mar 2016, 19:19

I agree with survivalgypsy ,there should be a way to score how much candy a child can buy or have depending on their age and health. Using this method healthier kids can have a little bit more candy in moderation. Even if it would cause a little bit more effort from the govenment it would better the lives of the children which is the more important.

User avatar
bookowlie
Special Discussion Leader
Posts: 7419
Joined: 25 Oct 2014, 09:52
2017 Reading Goal: 52
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 50
Favorite Book: The Lost Continent
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 313
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-bookowlie.html
Latest Review: The Scary Snow Day by Kyle Derby Pratt

Post by bookowlie » 02 Mar 2016, 20:58

TeaAndSpooks wrote:I think 'banning' it is probably not something that will ever happen in my lifetime (how would they even enforce that?). Processed junk and food additives have been around for a while. I personally try to eat organic, avoid additives and growth hormones when it comes to what I eat, and if I have kids I will definitely try to encourage that with them. But if they want a cosmic brownie every once in a while, I don't think I would tell them no. It's okay to treat yourself, but consuming junk food and fast food EVERY day is so so bad for the human body, and I wouldn't let my children do that.
I agree - how would it even be enforced?! I think it's ok in moderation, but it's better to promote healthy eating. I don't think the government needs to tell me what to eat. People have to take responsibility, although I do agree with the concept that there shouldn't be so many additives in foods or the promotion of junk food. I like the addition in recent years of calorie counts on restaurant menus. It's a real eye-opener.
"I am not afraid of storms, for I am learning how to sail my ship" - Louisa May Alcott

User avatar
kimmyschemy06
Posts: 2263
Joined: 20 Oct 2015, 20:49
2018 Reading Goal: 50
2017 Reading Goal: 50
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 86
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 136
Currently Reading: Fighting to Win
Bookshelf Size: 496
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-kimmyschemy06.html
Latest Review: American River: Currents by Mallory M. O'Connor

Post by kimmyschemy06 » 03 Mar 2016, 07:43

I'm not sure it would be possible to ban 'sugary or unhealthy foods'. I think healthy eating habits begin at home. The grown-ups should set a good example on eating what's good for the body until such time that the child can discriminate by himself which food to eat and which to avoid.

User avatar
emilyjune2011
Posts: 26
Joined: 01 Mar 2016, 08:52
2017 Reading Goal: 100
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 0
Currently Reading: Better Than Before
Bookshelf Size: 26
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-emilyjune2011.html
Reading Device: B00I15SB16
Location: Columbus, Ohio

Post by emilyjune2011 » 03 Mar 2016, 10:49

"Banning" sounds difficult. Like others have said, how could that be enforced? Like in New York, when Bloomberg tried to ban soda? Everyone went crazy. I think a lot of progress has been made just encouraging people to be healthier and showing the effects on the body when you consume nothing but sugary and unhealthy foods. And really, it's all about moderation. Banning the food just seems extreme to me, I suppose.

User avatar
bookowlie
Special Discussion Leader
Posts: 7419
Joined: 25 Oct 2014, 09:52
2017 Reading Goal: 52
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 50
Favorite Book: The Lost Continent
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 313
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-bookowlie.html
Latest Review: The Scary Snow Day by Kyle Derby Pratt

Post by bookowlie » 03 Mar 2016, 11:04

emilyjune2011 wrote:"Banning" sounds difficult. Like others have said, how could that be enforced? Like in New York, when Bloomberg tried to ban soda? Everyone went crazy. I think a lot of progress has been made just encouraging people to be healthier and showing the effects on the body when you consume nothing but sugary and unhealthy foods. And really, it's all about moderation. Banning the food just seems extreme to me, I suppose.
I remember that whole issue with Bloomberg trying to ban soda! I thought it was over the top, even though I am not a soda drinker and think most sodas contain a crazy high amount of sugar. One thing I liked about this book was that it brought out the importance of parents instilling good eating habits in children.
"I am not afraid of storms, for I am learning how to sail my ship" - Louisa May Alcott

User avatar
emilyjune2011
Posts: 26
Joined: 01 Mar 2016, 08:52
2017 Reading Goal: 100
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 0
Currently Reading: Better Than Before
Bookshelf Size: 26
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-emilyjune2011.html
Reading Device: B00I15SB16
Location: Columbus, Ohio

Post by emilyjune2011 » 03 Mar 2016, 11:30

bookowlie wrote:
emilyjune2011 wrote:"Banning" sounds difficult. Like others have said, how could that be enforced? Like in New York, when Bloomberg tried to ban soda? Everyone went crazy. I think a lot of progress has been made just encouraging people to be healthier and showing the effects on the body when you consume nothing but sugary and unhealthy foods. And really, it's all about moderation. Banning the food just seems extreme to me, I suppose.
I remember that whole issue with Bloomberg trying to ban soda! I thought it was over the top, even though I am not a soda drinker and think most sodas contain a crazy high amount of sugar. One thing I liked about this book was that it brought out the importance of parents instilling good eating habits in children.
I agree, that really hit home with me. My parents never encouraged healthy habits and it was really difficult for me to learn how to take care of myself in college.

User avatar
bookowlie
Special Discussion Leader
Posts: 7419
Joined: 25 Oct 2014, 09:52
2017 Reading Goal: 52
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 50
Favorite Book: The Lost Continent
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 313
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-bookowlie.html
Latest Review: The Scary Snow Day by Kyle Derby Pratt

Post by bookowlie » 03 Mar 2016, 11:39

When I was growing up, my mom hardly ever had soda in the house. She used to serve iced tea or lemonade with meals. Those drinks also contain sugar, but certainly not as much as soda. In our house, soda was more of a drink to have at the movies or with pizza.
"I am not afraid of storms, for I am learning how to sail my ship" - Louisa May Alcott

User avatar
emilyjune2011
Posts: 26
Joined: 01 Mar 2016, 08:52
2017 Reading Goal: 100
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 0
Currently Reading: Better Than Before
Bookshelf Size: 26
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-emilyjune2011.html
Reading Device: B00I15SB16
Location: Columbus, Ohio

Post by emilyjune2011 » 03 Mar 2016, 11:45

bookowlie wrote:When I was growing up, my mom hardly ever had soda in the house. She used to serve iced tea or lemonade with meals. Those drinks also contain sugar, but certainly not as much as soda. In our house, soda was more of a drink to have at the movies or with pizza.
That's good! Drinks weren't a big issue in my house, but prepackaged foods were a main staple in our dinners. Mom just didn't have time to cook real meals. Which makes this topic interesting. Would "banning" sugary or unhealthy foods prevent parents from giving it to their children? Or does that just mean making sure they can't get it at school or for themselves?

User avatar
Gravy
Gravymaster of Bookshelves
Posts: 31101
Joined: 27 Aug 2014, 02:02
2018 Reading Goal: 65
2017 Reading Goal: 60
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 50
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 78
Favorite Author: Too many to list
Favorite Book: As many as there are stars in the sky
Currently Reading: Black
Bookshelf Size: 880
Location: In A Good Book

Post by Gravy » 03 Mar 2016, 15:17

I think banning them would make them more alluring, and could lead to even more problems, but I think it would be a large improvement if stores stopped inundating shoppers with unhealthy foods at checkouts.

That was never even brought up in the book.

Fast food joints, and convenience stores are problematic, but even pharmacies are sugar pushers when it comes to checkouts.
If we extend unlimited tolerance even to those who are intolerant, if we are not prepared to defend a tolerant society against the onslaught of the intolerant, then the tolerant will be destroyed, and tolerance with them.

User avatar
CCtheBrave
Posts: 180
Joined: 11 Jul 2015, 14:35
2017 Reading Goal: 24
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 0
Favorite Author: Jorge Luis Borges
Currently Reading: Under Wildwood
Bookshelf Size: 165
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-ccthebrave.html
Latest Review: "Wild Ozark Nature Journal" by Madison Woods
Reading Device: B00I15SB16
fav_author_id: 2819
Location: Tacoma, WA

Post by CCtheBrave » 04 Mar 2016, 22:25

kimmyschemy06 wrote:I'm not sure it would be possible to ban 'sugary or unhealthy foods'. I think healthy eating habits begin at home. The grown-ups should set a good example on eating what's good for the body until such time that the child can discriminate by himself which food to eat and which to avoid.
I agree, I think it's up to parents to enforce eating habits and standards, I don't think the government should ban categories of food. I DO think that sugary and unhealthy foods shouldn't be options at schools, though. I don't see any reason why schools should be encouraging children to eat icky, processed and sugary foods.
read well and write bravely

Post Reply

Return to “"Eating Bull" by Carrie Rubin”