The Time Traveler's Wife ~ pages 500 - Fin.

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knightss
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The Time Traveler's Wife ~ pages 500 - Fin.

Post by knightss » 27 Jun 2007, 11:27

Wow, i thought this book was excellent... Although once again, i am tearless =/ i don't know, books just don't make me cry.

Share your overall view of the book here =)

i'd give it a 9.0/10 (which is surprising for me, i'm generally not a fan of contemporary work)
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Post by awelker » 27 Jun 2007, 14:14

i thought this was one of the best books that i had read in years. It is definetly one that i will reread (i don't reread much), and keep on my self. It was sad how Henry died and that Claire had an idea how he did. Im sorry to say I cried when i read the end. I give this one a 9.5/10.
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Post by sleepydumpling » 28 Jun 2007, 04:41

I'm going a 9.5 out of 10 too. Even though the ending broke my heart. But honestly, it's one of the most wonderful books I've ever read.

Him losing his feet was the first real heartbreaker for me, and then it just went all downhill from there.
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Post by knightss » 28 Jun 2007, 11:13

I thought the scene where Ingrid committed suicide was really intense.
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Post by awelker » 28 Jun 2007, 14:31

the ingrid part was intense. i couldn't believe that really happened. and the losing his feet was sad too because he was a runner and then he just became like a vegatable on the couch. very sad.
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Post by sleepydumpling » 29 Jun 2007, 05:19

Not only because he was a runner, but it was his freedom, and his mode of escape gone from him. No more could he protect himself with escape when he popped into another time.
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Post by awelker » 29 Jun 2007, 21:40

when he lost his feet it was probably one of the saddest parts of the book.
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Post by Scott » 30 Jun 2007, 15:38

After finishing the book, I felt sad. I do not think the ending caused it though. Granted, Henry losing his feet and spiraling to death is sad, but what really left me with a sad feeling was the book's representation of love, as fleeting. Clare and Henry's relationship had a few times of greatness and joy, but more often it involved longingly waiting. Even when they were together, often they were waiting for the other to grow up. For example, when Clare first met Henry in real time, she felt as though she wasn't with the Henry she loved, and she had to wait for the 28-year-old Henry to grow into the one she loved. Even though Henry and Clare experienced their love non-chronologically, I think their love still resembled the love of most people. I think love involves longing, waiting, pain, and trouble more than anything else. Generally, when in love we at least believe that the amazing greatness of the few good times more than make up for the pain and longing.

Anyway, I usually do not like love stories, but I enjoyed reading this book.
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Post by Sofia » 01 Jul 2007, 13:52

I finally finished this book. It was good, not the best, (IMO) but I did enjoy it. I don't think I have actually physically cried over a book ,but twice I came close. When Henry died, and then at the end when he came back to her.

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Post by knightss » 01 Jul 2007, 17:51

Scott Hughes wrote: Anyway, I usually do not like love stories, but I enjoyed reading this book.
Same here
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Post by sleepydumpling » 02 Jul 2007, 05:46

Oh God yes, that was the bit that threw me into the biggest crying jag, right at the end where he comes back to Claire. I want to cry now just thinking about it!
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Post by ghazali » 12 Jul 2007, 12:49

I read 'The Time Traveler's Wife' a few months ago and I thought it was poorly-written, below-average book.

Most of fiction is either plot-driven or character-driven, whereas this book failed to successfully meet the standards of either category.

It was written in a fragmentary style where the author presented the whole book in just snapshots which was a lazy way to write a novel. This vignette-style rendered the novel effectively plotless since the author just conjured up a domestic scene and based a chapter on that. The narrative was not intriguing enough to drive the story forward.

On the other hand, the novel could not be deemed character-driven either, since the author could not develop her characters beyond the stereotypical ones that she created. Such characters did not justify the novel to be one which is character-driven. Despite the book being over five-hundred pages long, I was unable to identify with the characters or get to know them with any depth. The author only described them superficially focusing on their favourite clothes, food, and music, and not much else.

For a much more intelligent, human, and wiser handling of the subject of time-travel, please read 'Replay' by Ken Grimwood.

http://www.amazon.com/Replay-Fantasy-Ma ... f_rd_i=ybh

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Post by sleepydumpling » 13 Jul 2007, 07:02

Actually I felt that the author worked well with the four major "doors" of the book. The language was beautiful, the setting felt as though I was there with them, the characters sank into my heart within pages and the story was well paced and took me on a journey with the book. Most of all it was the characters that won me over, but I am a very character-driven reader. I fell so in love with both Henry and Claire that the ending of the book literally broke my heart. It is definitely a book that speaks to a reader's heart. I have no time for authors who seem to think they are more intelligent than their readers.
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Post by part-time reader » 22 Aug 2007, 03:30

ghazali wrote:I read 'The Time Traveler's Wife' a few months ago and I thought it was poorly-written, below-average book.

Most of fiction is either plot-driven or character-driven, whereas this book failed to successfully meet the standards of either category.

It was written in a fragmentary style where the author presented the whole book in just snapshots which was a lazy way to write a novel. This vignette-style rendered the novel effectively plotless since the author just conjured up a domestic scene and based a chapter on that. The narrative was not intriguing enough to drive the story forward.

On the other hand, the novel could not be deemed character-driven either, since the author could not develop her characters beyond the stereotypical ones that she created. Such characters did not justify the novel to be one which is character-driven. Despite the book being over five-hundred pages long, I was unable to identify with the characters or get to know them with any depth. The author only described them superficially focusing on their favourite clothes, food, and music, and not much else.

For a much more intelligent, human, and wiser handling of the subject of time-travel, please read 'Replay' by Ken Grimwood.

http://www.amazon.com/Replay-Fantasy-Ma ... f_rd_i=ybh
I didn't feel this at all and after thinking about these two very different interpretations I came up with this conclusion.

The flip side to what you are saying is...the author intended the novel to feel this way, she wanted you to feel disconnect from the characters and their stories as they themselves were. The focus of the novel was the 'now', the smells, the sounds, the likes and dislikes, the pain and the love. The book was emotion-driven meant to feel just out of reach. Therefore the author succeded as proven by you.

Just an idea.

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Post by S dot Lennon » 31 Mar 2014, 16:54

I loved this book and I'm sorry some were disappointed by it. I remember loving the way she handled time travel and how that would affect someones life, especially if they are in an honest relationship and eventually have a child. I thought it was smart, well written and well developed. I fell in love with the story and the characters.
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