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Dad Blame

Discuss the November 2015 book of the month, Ruby's Choice by D.F. Jones

Dad Blame

Post Number:#1 by Scott
» 05 Dec 2015, 20:38

"dad blame"

I've never heard this before, but it came up repeatedly in the book.

I realized from the context it just meant something like 'gosh darn'.

I guess I'm just a hopeless Yankee. What do you think? :lol:

I think I might adopt this phrase. Maybe I can convince some of my Connecticut friends that I invented it.
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Re: Dad Blame

Post Number:#2 by gali
» 05 Dec 2015, 22:53

It was new to me too. 8)
In the case of good books, the point is not to see how many of them you can get through, but rather how many can get through to you." (Mortimer J. Adler)
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Re: Dad Blame

Post Number:#3 by DennisK
» 05 Dec 2015, 23:14

Dad-blamit! Oh, I've heard that sworn often - mostly form hill folk. Dad-gumit, or Dag namit .... all the same
In order to use it, you must wear overalls. A straw hat helps as well.
Last edited by DennisK on 05 Dec 2015, 23:21, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Dad Blame

Post Number:#4 by cranej80
» 05 Dec 2015, 23:20

I have hear this saying and probably have used it myself. I am small town country girl.
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Re: Dad Blame

Post Number:#5 by bookowlie
» 05 Dec 2015, 23:59

I also never heard that phrase before! I find regional differences interesting. I lived in Connecticut for 4 years and it was the first time I ever heard the term "grinder." :) As a native New Yorker, you would think moving to a neighboring state wouldn't cause culture shock. :)
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Re: Dad Blame

Post Number:#6 by DFJones
» 06 Dec 2015, 02:37

Scott wrote:"dad blame"

I've never heard this before, but it came up repeatedly in the book.

I realized from the context it just meant something like 'gosh darn'.

I guess I'm just a hopeless Yankee. What do you think? :lol:

I think I might adopt this phrase. Maybe I can convince some of my Connecticut friends that I invented it.



Dad blame it. Dad durn it. Dad gum it. I'll be diddly dad blame.
These are southern slang for curse words often used by my father. He grew up on a farm, but I never once saw him in a pair of overalls or a piece of straw hanging out of his mouth, maybe a tooth pick. Lol. Although, the way we Southerners express ourselves often confuses those 'not from 'round here'. Sadly, many of these colloquialisms are fading away and rarely used by the younger generation.
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Re: Dad Blame

Post Number:#7 by DennisK
» 06 Dec 2015, 09:39

DFJones wrote:
Scott wrote:"dad blame"

I've never heard this before, but it came up repeatedly in the book.

I realized from the context it just meant something like 'gosh darn'.

I guess I'm just a hopeless Yankee. What do you think? :lol:

I think I might adopt this phrase. Maybe I can convince some of my Connecticut friends that I invented it.



Dad blame it. Dad durn it. Dad gum it. I'll be diddly dad blame.
These are southern slang for curse words often used by my father. He grew up on a farm, but I never once saw him in a pair of overalls or a piece of straw hanging out of his mouth, maybe a tooth pick. Lol. Although, the way we Southerners express ourselves often confuses those 'not from 'round here'. Sadly, many of these colloquialisms are fading away and rarely used by the younger generation.


Yes, it is a shame. We are losing much of what makes us unique. We are becoming a homogenized culture.
And Hazel agrees - Woof!
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Re: Dad Blame

Post Number:#8 by Scott
» 06 Dec 2015, 10:21

bookowlie wrote:I also never heard that phrase before! I find regional differences interesting. I lived in Connecticut for 4 years and it was the first time I ever heard the term "grinder." :) As a native New Yorker, you would think moving to a neighboring state wouldn't cause culture shock. :)

What else could you possibly call a grinder :?: :!: :o
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Re: Dad Blame

Post Number:#9 by Tinoran
» 06 Dec 2015, 10:27

It's strange the way we use the same words with different meanings depending on location, or background, too. A grinder can be a type of sandwich or a paved area. Dad (insert word here) will get you slapped at my Aunt's house, but laughed at in my Uncle's. Strange...
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Re: Dad Blame

Post Number:#10 by bookowlie
» 06 Dec 2015, 12:30

Scott wrote:
bookowlie wrote:I also never heard that phrase before! I find regional differences interesting. I lived in Connecticut for 4 years and it was the first time I ever heard the term "grinder." :) As a native New Yorker, you would think moving to a neighboring state wouldn't cause culture shock. :)

What else could you possibly call a grinder :?: :!: :o


A sub. :lol: :lol: :lol:
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Re: Dad Blame

Post Number:#11 by DennisK
» 06 Dec 2015, 17:28

Tinoran wrote:It's strange the way we use the same words with different meanings depending on location, or background, too. ...


A complaint of mine - never more than in the computer realm: Mouse, worm, etc... It's like we ran out of words; so we have to reuse the ones we already have. Why can't we just makeup a new word for those things that are new? :eusa-think:
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Re: Dad Blame

Post Number:#12 by Tinoran
» 06 Dec 2015, 22:00

DennisK wrote:
Tinoran wrote:It's strange the way we use the same words with different meanings depending on location, or background, too. ...


A complaint of mine - never more than in the computer realm: Mouse, worm, etc... It's like we ran out of words; so we have to reuse the ones we already have. Why can't we just makeup a new word for those things that are new? :eusa-think:


I get what you're saying, but when you have a completely new field (computers), people will tend to name things after something familiar and people will repeat what is easy. A mouse because the first ones looked like one to one of the Apple Sales people. A worm got the name because of what it does, similar with a virus and what it does to your computer, While I have actually seen the very first 'bug' (a fly that landed between two circuits and shorted them together) saved on a card in a museum.
The strange part to me is how the same words mean different things in different areas: 'Bar-B-Que' where I was raised is called 'grilling' where I am now, while 'smoking' where I grew up is 'Bar-B-Que' here and 'Grilling' at home is called 'broiling'... Why do the meanings drift so far in this age of travel and mass communications? Why aren't they coming closer together?
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Re: Dad Blame

Post Number:#13 by DennisK
» 06 Dec 2015, 23:35

WE NEED WORD POLICE! :angry-tappingfoot:
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Re: Dad Blame

Post Number:#14 by bookowlie
» 07 Dec 2015, 10:03

DennisK wrote: Yes, it is a shame. We are losing much of what makes us unique. We are becoming a homogenized culture.


I agree that America is becoming homogenized, with the same chain stores in every town and on the internet. In the process, the things that make local areas special are getting lost in the shuffle.
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Re: Dad Blame

Post Number:#15 by bookowlie
» 07 Dec 2015, 10:03

DennisK wrote: Yes, it is a shame. We are losing much of what makes us unique. We are becoming a homogenized culture.


I agree that America is becoming homogenized, with the same chain stores in every town and on the internet. In the process, the things that make local areas special are getting lost in the shuffle.
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