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Re: Why Do Great Books Get Ignored?

Posted: 20 Apr 2019, 01:45
by TopaAzul062
It's an interesting question with no one single answer. I remember reading In the Forests of the Night by Amelia Atwater-Rhodes in high school. It was picked up from the library and the title reminded me of the poem by the same name that I just finished reading.

The story itself focused on vampires, vampire hunters along with humans but the way she wrote about them differed greatly from the tales that were read prior. Her vampires didn't just roam about at night, they actually engaged in day-to-day life be it under the sun or moon (unless it's cloudy). To me the book was amazing and the sneak peek of her then upcoming book Demon in my View was attention grabbing.

Very little was heard of the book after reading and she pretty much got her start in writing by way of her teacher who helped her get the book published. Not all great books get ignored as some wind up in classrooms as assigned reading material. That said, the readers will likely get turned off due to the pre-req of identifying a list of items they are to locate within the pages they're reading.

I'm okay with giving new books a try as long as they peak my interest. It's not just luck and marketing, it's about reaching the right people in the right places.

Re: Why Do Great Books Get Ignored?

Posted: 06 Jun 2019, 10:41
by njc28
Great books are ignored due to their longer to both while making review and reading before advertising or sharing to your friends or customers.

Re: Why Do Great Books Get Ignored?

Posted: 13 Jun 2019, 08:17
by evraealtana
I think part of it is what defines a "good" book. A book that speaks to you may not speak to anyone else.

- Think back to a popular book that you hated. Twilight? Eragon? The Hunger Games? Harry Potter? For me, it was Fifty Shades. I could NOT see why everyone loved it.

- Perhaps it works in reverse, too? A book that everyone else ignores/dislikes really resonates with you on a deep level? For me, it was a book called "The Shakespeare Stealer". It turns out that it was a children's book, and that I was about 10 years older than the target audience by the time I read it. But, decades later, I still think about that book regularly. I can't find any other person who's even HEARD of it, much less read it.

- Something about the book + who you are at the time you read it + what was happening in your life = a deep, personal, soul-level resonance. I'm not sure how to MAKE that happen, or even to PREDICT it happening, but it seems to me that all the factors have to line up to create a book experience that is "good". Apparently the factors, whatever they are, are more often in line for books that become popular?

Speculation on my part. But those are my thoughts.

Re: Why Do Great Books Get Ignored?

Posted: 21 Jun 2019, 12:42
by JennyorAlice
I agree with what @evraealtana said. If you walked around to each person and asked them what is a great book, you're going to get a different answer depending on the person you're asking. Different books will resonate with different people. What you like to read, others may not like and vise versa.

Re: Why Do Great Books Get Ignored?

Posted: 07 Jul 2019, 04:56
by Tamorie21
TopaAzul062 wrote:
20 Apr 2019, 01:45
It's an interesting question with no one single answer. I remember reading In the Forests of the Night by Amelia Atwater-Rhodes in high school. It was picked up from the library and the title reminded me of the poem by the same name that I just finished reading.

The story itself focused on vampires, vampire hunters along with humans but the way she wrote about them differed greatly from the tales that were read prior. Her vampires didn't just roam about at night, they actually engaged in day-to-day life be it under the sun or moon (unless it's cloudy). To me the book was amazing and the sneak peek of her then upcoming book Demon in my View was attention grabbing.

Very little was heard of the book after reading and she pretty much got her start in writing by way of her teacher who helped her get the book published. Not all great books get ignored as some wind up in classrooms as assigned reading material. That said, the readers will likely get turned off due to the pre-req of identifying a list of items they are to locate within the pages they're reading.

I'm okay with giving new books a try as long as they peak my interest. It's not just luck and marketing, it's about reaching the right people in the right places.
My goodness, just before clicking on this thread I thought to myself: "Why are there NEVER posts about Amelia Atwater-Rhodes?" And here you are!

I've wondered the same thing plenty of times. I was also super caught up in her vampire books. Read them feverishly, and I agree that her application of the vampire craze was something that I'd never read before. It's the same with Vampirates by Justin Somper. These books are really creative, and yet, no one really speaks about them. I think this is precisely the reason -- because they're so different than typical vampire books which are more about the cringey romance. Vampire romance is good, yes, but I need a little bit more.