Singular or Plural?

Some grammar rules (and embarrassing mistakes!) transcend the uniqueness of different regions and style guides. This new International Grammar section by OnlineBookClub.org ultimately identifies those rules thus providing a simple, flexible rule-set, respecting the differences between regions and style guides. You can feel free to ask general questions about spelling and grammar. You can also provide example sentences for other members to proofread and inform you of any grammar mistakes.
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lbhatters
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Singular or Plural?

Post by lbhatters » 13 Apr 2018, 12:09

Hi guys.

I found this statenent online.

"Any – means one of a group and it doesn’t matter which one you choose.
Every – means all of the group.

For example:

Every student wrote five essays. (Means all the students completed the task)
Did any student write five essays? (Means has at least one student written five essays, it doesn’t matter which specific student).

However, remember that both any and every refer to a single item of a list and hence are treated as singular.

HAS any student done the home work.
Every student HAS done the work.

Contrast it with: All students HAVE done the work. (All – makes it plural while both any and every are singular)."

http://www.bodhisutra.com/question/the- ... and-every/

Also,

"The American Heritage Dictionary says:

When used as a pronoun, any can take either a singular or plural verb, depending on how it is construed: Any of these books is suitable (that is, any one). But are any (that is, some) of them available?"

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.englis ... np/amp.htm

Based on this, the sentence, "Any changes (plural) he says begins with you and me, since statistically it's likely anyone at all reading his book is in this category of the politically uncommitted" would be correct in American English (not talking about British English), because "any changes" would be considered a group and therefore treated as singular. Any comments?
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Mildred Tabitha
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Post by Mildred Tabitha » 26 Apr 2018, 00:00

Wow! I got a little confused when reading about"any" taking a plural form. But your explanation is good and I have now understood just after reading the examples. It's really a challenge but I mostly pay attention to whether the statement will make sense or not. I rarely pay attention to tenses but I should start doing so. :D
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Post by jgraney8 » 09 May 2018, 22:35

For any, it depends on what any refers to. By that I mean, when any refers to a countable noun, i.e., one that has a plural form like books, the verb will be plural or without an -s ending. In contrast, when any refers to an uncountable noun like sand or water, the verb will be singular or with an s ending.

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Post by love_b00ks » 21 May 2018, 06:40

jgraney8 wrote:
09 May 2018, 22:35
For any, it depends on what any refers to. By that I mean, when any refers to a countable noun, i.e., one that has a plural form like books, the verb will be plural or without an -s ending. In contrast, when any refers to an uncountable noun like sand or water, the verb will be singular or with an s ending.
This, plus the one stated above are really good references for the "any: usage. Thanks!

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Post by Iqra_rehman » 21 May 2018, 06:43

Nicely you clear confusions of many people thanks

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Post by PHisarza » 27 May 2018, 00:41

Thank you for the information.

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