Comma usage question

Some grammar rules (and embarrassing mistakes!) transcend the uniqueness of different regions and style guides. This new International Grammar section by OnlineBookClub.org ultimately identifies those rules thus providing a simple, flexible rule-set, respecting the differences between regions and style guides. You can feel free to ask general questions about spelling and grammar. You can also provide example sentences for other members to proofread and inform you of any grammar mistakes.
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ButterscotchCherrie
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Comma usage question

Post by ButterscotchCherrie » 02 Nov 2017, 04:07

This is a meeting agenda item. Which is correct, and why?

(a) Training course on life-saving techniques to be conducted with the support of the Baywatch Fund

OR

(b) Training course on life-saving techniques, to be conducted with the support of the Baywatch Fund

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DustinPBrown
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Post by DustinPBrown » 02 Nov 2017, 17:03

I would split that into two sentences, otherwise it's a comma splice.

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kislany
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Post by kislany » 03 Nov 2017, 01:38

I would rephrase it. It's the type of awkward sentence I used to come across back in the day when I worked in corporate business.

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ReyvrexQuestor Reyes
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Post by ReyvrexQuestor Reyes » 03 Nov 2017, 05:04

Better simplify it to the subject-predicate format. OR maybe, the comma could be replaced by a colon.
"In the beginning was the word.........John 1:1"

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Post by KHING1209159 » 05 Nov 2017, 21:17

A comma may help seperating an dependent clause from the interogative group of word which gives the main idea.

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ButterscotchCherrie
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Post by ButterscotchCherrie » 06 Nov 2017, 03:40

KHING1209159 wrote:A comma may help seperating an dependent clause from the interogative group of word which gives the main idea.
I struggled to work out whether that clause was dependent or not!

-- 06 Nov 2017, 09:41 --
ReyvrexQuestor Reyes wrote: OR maybe, the comma could be replaced by a colon.
Or maybe a dash?

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Post by KHING1209159 » 06 Nov 2017, 07:47

Since we're talking about the usage of comma in a question the words or phrase before the comma is definitely a dependent clause if it doesn't have either the subject or the predicate. And the other group of words next to the comma, the independent clause is the one which gives you the main thougth. :tiphat:

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CommMayo
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Post by CommMayo » 16 Nov 2017, 23:26

I tend to relax traditional grammar rules when dealing with items in a bulleted list-like what you would see in an agenda or PowerPoint presentation. I have always looked at them as forms of shorthand. If I had to pick one, I would go with the second option. It sounds better read aloud with the pause.

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Post by Paul78 » 01 Dec 2017, 09:01

ButterscotchCherrie wrote:
02 Nov 2017, 04:07
This is a meeting agenda item. Which is correct, and why?

(a) Training course on life-saving techniques to be conducted with the support of the Baywatch Fund

OR

(b) Training course on life-saving techniques, to be conducted with the support of the Baywatch Fund
I would go by the second option.
If there would be an option to rewrite,then I would say the following:

"The training course on life-saving techniques, will be conducted with the support of the Baywatch Fund".
An investment in knowledge pays the best interest.
Benjamin Franklin

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