Fewer commas,

Some grammar rules (and embarrassing mistakes!) transcend the uniqueness of different regions and style guides. This new International Grammar section by OnlineBookClub.org ultimately identifies those rules thus providing a simple, flexible rule-set, respecting the differences between regions and style guides. You can feel free to ask general questions about spelling and grammar. You can also provide example sentences for other members to proofread and inform you of any grammar mistakes.
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jenjayfromSA
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Re: Fewer commas,

Post by jenjayfromSA » 22 Oct 2018, 09:24

Commas are a thorny issue, especially with "and". I grew up with British punctuation which does not use a comma with "and". I see Americans do, but then they don't use a comma with "but". I've been browsing sites, but I still get confused. I see one rule is to use the comma with "and" when the second thought is a full sentence. On the whole I go by gut feel and what helps the reader's understanding. Am I right? Who knows.

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Miriam Molina
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Post by Miriam Molina » 22 Oct 2018, 10:25

There are various reasons for using commas. One is this: Commas are needed in compound sentences (those with two independent clauses) which use the conjunctions FANBOYS (for, and, nor, but, or, yet, and so. The commas precede the conjunctions.
You are right in saying that commas are used for clarity.
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Post by Eva Darrington » 22 Oct 2018, 10:42

I use FANBOYS as a tool as well. I am thinking the same rule applies when "as" serves as a conjunction (with two independent clauses): "Marge decided to wear her gloves to the game, as she knew it would be cold once the sun went down."
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Post by CatInTheHat » 22 Oct 2018, 16:49

jenjayfromSA wrote:
22 Oct 2018, 09:24
Commas are a thorny issue, especially with "and". I grew up with British punctuation which does not use a comma with "and". I see Americans do, but then they don't use a comma with "but". I've been browsing sites, but I still get confused. I see one rule is to use the comma with "and" when the second thought is a full sentence. On the whole I go by gut feel and what helps the reader's understanding. Am I right? Who knows.
Americans use commas with "but" when it's connecting two independent clauses. If it's connecting a dependent clause with an independent clause, then a comma is not used. Same rule for "and."
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Post by jgraney8 » 23 Oct 2018, 12:20

Eva Darrington wrote:
22 Oct 2018, 10:42
I use FANBOYS as a tool as well. I am thinking the same rule applies when "as" serves as a conjunction (with two independent clauses): "Marge decided to wear her gloves to the game, as she knew it would be cold once the sun went down."
As here works much like because which is a subordinating conjunction. All the examples on the Merriam-Webster site https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/as use as without a comma.
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