What is a run-on sentence?

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Wasif Ahmed
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What is a run-on sentence?

Post by Wasif Ahmed » 01 Jan 2017, 21:05

I have received criticism from the editor regarding the sentence being a run on sentence but can't exactly figure out what this means. Also, how do you avoid this?
Thank you.
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Post by Sarah_Khan » 03 Jan 2017, 16:30

A run-on sentence is when you have a sentence that has 2 or more complete sentences that aren't separated by any punctuation.
For example, "Bob is the smartest child in school he is an honor roll student."
The sentence can either be separated into 2 or you can add a comma. So it should be "Bob is the smartest child in school, he is an honor roll student."
Hope I helped! :)

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Post by bookowlie » 03 Jan 2017, 17:03

Actually, the example given with the comma is still run-on. You would need to use either a semi-colon or period.

-- 03 Jan 2017, 18:31 --

There are other types of run-on sentences. Here are some examples -

I went to the store and the cashier took my money and I left the store after that and I walked to my car.
John said hello to Mary after he arrived at work and he took off his coat and put down his briefcase and answered his phone when it started ringing.

These are extreme examples, but I just wanted to give you an idea.
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Wasif Ahmed
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Post by Wasif Ahmed » 03 Jan 2017, 19:41

Sarah_Khan wrote:A run-on sentence is when you have a sentence that has 2 or more complete sentences that aren't separated by any punctuation.
For example, "Bob is the smartest child in school he is an honor roll student."
The sentence can either be separated into 2 or you can add a comma. So it should be "Bob is the smartest child in school, he is an honor roll student."
Hope I helped! :)
Thanks sarah_khan. :)

-- 04 Jan 2017, 06:12 --
bookowlie wrote:Actually, the example given with the comma is still run-on. You would need to use either a semi-colon or period.

-- 03 Jan 2017, 18:31 --

There are other types of run-on sentences. Here are some examples -

I went to the store and the cashier took my money and I left the store after that and I walked to my car.
John said hello to Mary after he arrived at work and he took off his coat and put down his briefcase and answered his phone when it started ringing.

These are extreme examples, but I just wanted to give you an idea.
Thanks @bookowlie. :)
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Post by Megan Old » 07 Jun 2017, 22:00

Run-on sentences are basically sentences that has more than one idea without any semi-colon or commas separating it.

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Post by Sophie11 » 28 Jul 2017, 06:18

Okay, i think i get the idea; i have a habit of writing run-on sentences. I have never used semi colon much in my writing, but now i will develop a practice for it.

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Post by BoyLazy » 30 Sep 2017, 03:25

Sarah_Khan wrote:A run-on sentence is when you have a sentence that has 2 or more complete sentences that aren't separated by any punctuation.
For example, "Bob is the smartest child in school he is an honor roll student."
The sentence can either be separated into 2 or you can add a comma. So it should be "Bob is the smartest child in school, he is an honor roll student."
Hope I helped! :)
Great one
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