Past tense of "Drag"

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Raja28
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Past tense of "Drag"

Post by Raja28 » 20 Aug 2018, 20:53

I've been taught that the Past Tense / Past Participle of the verb "Drag" is "Dragged". Recently I came across some text where the word "Drug" is used instead. Any thoughts on this?

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Post by CatInTheHat » 20 Aug 2018, 22:08

I've seen both drug and dragged used.
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Post by Gravy » 20 Aug 2018, 23:30

According to Google (and apparently The Grammar Guru), dragged is the correct form.


However, like CatInTheHat, I have heard/seen drug used, instead.
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Post by DATo » 21 Aug 2018, 02:20

I know of no rules which say that "drug" cannot be used but it always produces a cringe in me when I hear it used in place of "dragged". The same occurs when I hear the word "learnt" as opposed to "learned" and yet no less an orator than Winston Churchill has repeatedly used "learnt" in public speeches. I don't know if this is more of an accepted convention in the UK than in The States, and after all "UK English" is the mother tongue, but "learnt" much like "drug" still sort of rakes on the ears.
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Post by Raja28 » 21 Aug 2018, 05:04

CatInTheHat wrote:
20 Aug 2018, 22:08
I've seen both drug and dragged used.
Thanks! This was the first time I came across such usage and it didn't feel right...

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Post by Raja28 » 21 Aug 2018, 05:07

Gravy wrote:
20 Aug 2018, 23:30
According to Google (and apparently The Grammar Guru), dragged is the correct form.
However, like CatInTheHat, I have heard/seen drug used, instead.
Thanks! The dictionaries I referred say "dragged" is correct though.

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Post by Raja28 » 21 Aug 2018, 05:09

DATo wrote:
21 Aug 2018, 02:20
I know of no rules which say that "drug" cannot be used but it always produces a cringe in me when I hear it used in place of "dragged". The same occurs when I hear the word "learnt" as opposed to "learned" and yet no less an orator than Winston Churchill has repeatedly used "learnt" in public speeches. I don't know if this is more of an accepted convention in the UK than in The States, and after all "UK English" is the mother tongue, but "learnt" much like "drug" still sort of rakes on the ears.
My feelings exactly... "Drug" in place of "Dragged" doesn't sound good to me at all...

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Post by Gravy » 21 Aug 2018, 05:56

DATo wrote:
21 Aug 2018, 02:20
I know of no rules which say that "drug" cannot be used but it always produces a cringe in me when I hear it used in place of "dragged". The same occurs when I hear the word "learnt" as opposed to "learned" and yet no less an orator than Winston Churchill has repeatedly used "learnt" in public speeches. I don't know if this is more of an accepted convention in the UK than in The States, and after all "UK English" is the mother tongue, but "learnt" much like "drug" still sort of rakes on the ears.
You may have Teddy Roosevelt to blame for learnt. I saw this covered on a documentary series (just the other day, for a bit of irony).
You can read about it here.
The documentary segment, however, went into slightly more depth. According to it, he was a terrible speller and just wanted to simplify the English language. They even showed the paper of the 300 suggested word changes. Some have become the norm (labor instead of labour), while others have not (still fixed, not fixt). :lol:
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Post by sarahbarthurs » 21 Aug 2018, 18:20

I agree that it sounds strange. Based on personal experience, I believe that 'dragged' is the correct way to express 'drag' in the past tense.

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Post by Raja28 » 21 Aug 2018, 22:48

sarahbarthurs wrote:
21 Aug 2018, 18:20
I agree that it sounds strange. Based on personal experience, I believe that 'dragged' is the correct way to express 'drag' in the past tense.
Yes, "dragged" sounds correct. Thanks!

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Post by kaymontacell » 22 Aug 2018, 19:49

Looked this up—it looks like "dragged" and "drug" can be used interchangeably, but dragged is the truly correct word. "Drug" is used in certain American English verbal dialects, however, so take that how you will. Vernacular is as vernacular does, I guess.
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Post by Raja28 » 22 Aug 2018, 20:15

kaymontacell wrote:
22 Aug 2018, 19:49
Looked this up—it looks like "dragged" and "drug" can be used interchangeably, but dragged is the truly correct word. "Drug" is used in certain American English verbal dialects, however, so take that how you will. Vernacular is as vernacular does, I guess.
Thanks! "Drug" may be okay if written as part of a text in vernacular, but "dragged" is correct always. This is my conclusion based on the discussion.

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Post by kaymontacell » 22 Aug 2018, 21:17

Raja28 wrote:
22 Aug 2018, 20:15
kaymontacell wrote:
22 Aug 2018, 19:49
Looked this up—it looks like "dragged" and "drug" can be used interchangeably, but dragged is the truly correct word. "Drug" is used in certain American English verbal dialects, however, so take that how you will. Vernacular is as vernacular does, I guess.
Thanks! "Drug" may be okay if written as part of a text in vernacular, but "dragged" is correct always. This is my conclusion based on the discussion.
No problem! I actually asked my parents about it, and one said "dragged" while the other said "drug" (We live in Boston, but both of them are from the West Coast). Go figure.
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Post by Nditah » 28 Aug 2018, 10:58

If you are using MS Word, it would depend on the language setting: USA or UK.

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Post by Raja28 » 28 Aug 2018, 20:45

MS Word's language setting doesn't catch this one since both 'drug' and 'dragged' are correct words having different meanings. Based on my asking about, most people use 'dragged' and the dictionaries say it's correct. But 'drug' also is used by a few people, especially in some parts of North America.

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