UK v American

Some grammar rules (and embarrassing mistakes!) transcend the uniqueness of different regions and style guides. This new International Grammar section by OnlineBookClub.org ultimately identifies those rules thus providing a simple, flexible rule-set, respecting the differences between regions and style guides. You can feel free to ask general questions about spelling and grammar. You can also provide example sentences for other members to proofread and inform you of any grammar mistakes.
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Re: UK v American

Post by Helen_Combe » 22 May 2018, 06:36

Oh boy, the Green Party aren’t going to be happy with that description!
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Post by Miriam Molina » 22 May 2018, 07:27

ButterscotchCherrie wrote:
22 May 2018, 05:48
Hee! Underpass is British too (mentioned in a Smiths song!) but if you told me someone was green I'd think they were more callow than salacious.
In the US, green-minded people are those concerned with the environment and the preservation of Mother Nature.

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Post by ButterscotchCherrie » 22 May 2018, 07:49

In the US, green-minded people are those concerned with the environment and the preservation of Mother Nature.
[/quote]

Yes, there's that too - as in the green political parties, some of which are quite prominent in this part of the world. Still, I'd say "inexperienced" is my first thought - Cleopatra's salad days, and all that.

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Post by Sahani Nimandra » 23 May 2018, 04:23

lbhatters wrote:
15 Apr 2018, 11:57
Helen_Combe wrote:
15 Apr 2018, 11:28
We all know the ‘o’ v ‘ou’ difference between US and UK English (colour, flavour, favour, honour)

But I’ve been coming across a few that are new to me, so I’m listing them here.

UK - likeable US - likable
UK - kerb for a raised edge on a road (curb for everything else) US curb for both
UK - travelled US - traveled
UK - whisky US - whiskey

And the old favourites

UK - chips US - French Fries
UK - crisps US - chips
UK - football US - soccer
UK - rugby US - football
UK - American football US - football

Anyone like to add any more?
Your question promted me to look it up. I found a great article about it.

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/spell ... d-spelling

There are a lot.

analyze - analyse
apologize - apologise
behavior - behaviour
canceling - cancelling
catalog - catalogue
center - centre
check - cheque
color - colour
encyclopedia - encyclopaedia
favorite - favourite
fiber - fibre
fulfill - fulfil
gray - grey
humor - humour
jewelry - jewellery
labor - labour
license - licence (noun)
pajamas - pyjamas
practice - practise (verb)
theater - theatre
tire - tyre

to name a few.

http://grammar.yourdictionary.com/spell ... words.html
Thank you so much for the link :tiphat:
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Post by biscuits » 24 May 2018, 07:02

PlanetHauth wrote:
03 May 2018, 03:56
Helen_Combe wrote:
03 May 2018, 03:36
PlanetHauth wrote:
03 May 2018, 03:16

I knew about most of these, and actually learned the other day where the UK uses double l's, the US uses a single (like in the example above), and as another commenter pointed out with analyze vs. analyse, where the UK uses z, the US uses s. I'm not sure if this is a general, broad-sweeping rule, or if it only applies to certain words, though.

The one that sticks out to me is likeable vs. likable. I'm American and swear I have never seen it spelled l-i-k-a-b-l-e. :eusa-think: And I swear I've only ever used the UK spelling in my own writing, but now I'm questioning everything. :?
Off the top of my head, I think the ‘z’ rule is for words that end ‘ise’ or ‘yse’.
I think both the likeables are accepted, but the one without the e is more predominantly used. Mind you, words change over time, so maybe popularity is shifting.


I came across a great one yesterday.

What I call pumps are called sneakers is the US
What I call court shoes are called pumps in the US.

I was totally bamboozled to find that American women apparently wear heels and patent leather while playing sport :shock2:
The 'z' rule you mentioned makes sense, now that I think about it.

:lol2: I bet you were bamboozled! I enjoy seeing the differences between the "two" languages. It makes me realize just how different the cultures are, even though the US stemmed from the UK way back when, and leads me down a great etymological rabbit hole.

Although, I think my favorite pastime is reading stories or comments discussing the UK's use of "fanny" vs. the US's use of the word. :lol2: I guess any comparison of the English language is fun to me, but this particular word and the conversation that ensues is usually pretty hysterical to me.
It is really bewildering that these 'two' languages have a lot of differences. Sometimes when you don't know the differences, you tend to mix them up (I've been a culprit). The posts and articles have really been an eye opener.

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Post by PlanetHauth » 24 May 2018, 22:52

biscuits wrote:
24 May 2018, 07:02
PlanetHauth wrote:
03 May 2018, 03:56
Helen_Combe wrote:
03 May 2018, 03:36

Off the top of my head, I think the ‘z’ rule is for words that end ‘ise’ or ‘yse’.
I think both the likeables are accepted, but the one without the e is more predominantly used. Mind you, words change over time, so maybe popularity is shifting.


I came across a great one yesterday.

What I call pumps are called sneakers is the US
What I call court shoes are called pumps in the US.

I was totally bamboozled to find that American women apparently wear heels and patent leather while playing sport :shock2:
The 'z' rule you mentioned makes sense, now that I think about it.

:lol2: I bet you were bamboozled! I enjoy seeing the differences between the "two" languages. It makes me realize just how different the cultures are, even though the US stemmed from the UK way back when, and leads me down a great etymological rabbit hole.

Although, I think my favorite pastime is reading stories or comments discussing the UK's use of "fanny" vs. the US's use of the word. :lol2: I guess any comparison of the English language is fun to me, but this particular word and the conversation that ensues is usually pretty hysterical to me.
It is really bewildering that these 'two' languages have a lot of differences. Sometimes when you don't know the differences, you tend to mix them up (I've been a culprit). The posts and articles have really been an eye opener.
Funny enough, your username is one of the words that has a big difference depending on which version of English you speak. :lol:
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Post by Helen_Combe » 26 May 2018, 02:22

Another one I enjoy is that there appears to be some bowdlerisation over the work ‘cock’

We have cockroaches, the US have roaches
We have cockerels, the US have roosters
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Post by CatInTheHat » 26 May 2018, 08:37

Helen_Combe wrote:
26 May 2018, 02:22
Another one I enjoy is that there appears to be some bowdlerisation over the work ‘cock’

We have cockroaches, the US have roaches
We have cockerels, the US have roosters
In the US, we say both cockroaches and roaches.
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Post by Helen_Combe » 26 May 2018, 09:33

CatInTheHat wrote:
26 May 2018, 08:37
Helen_Combe wrote:
26 May 2018, 02:22
Another one I enjoy is that there appears to be some bowdlerisation over the work ‘cock’

We have cockroaches, the US have roaches
We have cockerels, the US have roosters
In the US, we say both cockroaches and roaches.
I didn’t realise that, thanks for the correction. We don’t use roach.
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Post by cyndisays » 27 May 2018, 07:20

Thank you for the posting. I’ve run across these as well. The list is long, however, it becomes easier.

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Post by biscuits » 03 Jun 2018, 02:15

PlanetHauth wrote:
24 May 2018, 22:52
biscuits wrote:
24 May 2018, 07:02
PlanetHauth wrote:
03 May 2018, 03:56


The 'z' rule you mentioned makes sense, now that I think about it.

:lol2: I bet you were bamboozled! I enjoy seeing the differences between the "two" languages. It makes me realize just how different the cultures are, even though the US stemmed from the UK way back when, and leads me down a great etymological rabbit hole.

Although, I think my favorite pastime is reading stories or comments discussing the UK's use of "fanny" vs. the US's use of the word. :lol2: I guess any comparison of the English language is fun to me, but this particular word and the conversation that ensues is usually pretty hysterical to me.
It is really bewildering that these 'two' languages have a lot of differences. Sometimes when you don't know the differences, you tend to mix them up (I've been a culprit). The posts and articles have really been an eye opener.
That is so true :lol:
Funny enough, your username is one of the words that has a big difference depending on which version of English you speak. :lol:

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Post by PlanetHauth » 04 Jun 2018, 00:16

biscuits wrote:
03 Jun 2018, 02:15
PlanetHauth wrote:
24 May 2018, 22:52
biscuits wrote:
24 May 2018, 07:02


It is really bewildering that these 'two' languages have a lot of differences. Sometimes when you don't know the differences, you tend to mix them up (I've been a culprit). The posts and articles have really been an eye opener.
That is so true :lol:
Funny enough, your username is one of the words that has a big difference depending on which version of English you speak. :lol:
The "Hauth" part, I'm guessing? It also depends on your German too! We (my family, as it's our last name) pronounce it like Planet Hoth, the rebel alliance's base planet in Star Wars (hence my username), but I know it can potentially be pronounced as "how-th."
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Post by kgloving » 07 Jul 2018, 16:59

I've noticed a difference between the UK and American usage of subject-verb agreement. As an American, I'd say: My family is coming to my house for dinner. I've heard my English friends say: My family are coming to my house for dinner. We'd say: The media is fake. They'd say: The media are fake. (Both might be accurate in that case.) Examples go on and on. Can someone please enlighten me on this?

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Post by Helen_Combe » 08 Jul 2018, 01:07

kgloving wrote:
07 Jul 2018, 16:59
I've noticed a difference between the UK and American usage of subject-verb agreement. As an American, I'd say: My family is coming to my house for dinner. I've heard my English friends say: My family are coming to my house for dinner. We'd say: The media is fake. They'd say: The media are fake. (Both might be accurate in that case.) Examples go on and on. Can someone please enlighten me on this?
I don’t think that is a difference between countries. That’s a common singular/plural mistake and is down to the individual.
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