The word "type" used as a noun meaning model

Some grammar rules (and embarrassing mistakes!) transcend the uniqueness of different regions and style guides. This new International Grammar section by OnlineBookClub.org ultimately identifies those rules thus providing a simple, flexible rule-set, respecting the differences between regions and style guides. You can feel free to ask general questions about spelling and grammar. You can also provide example sentences for other members to proofread and inform you of any grammar mistakes.
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ohlendorfbe
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The word "type" used as a noun meaning model

Post by ohlendorfbe »

According to Dictionary.com, the word "type" can mean model of something or someone. ex: "the very type of a headmaster". In one of my reviews I was counted wrong in this sentence: ""Joey is a bit of a type of myself." Using this definition, I say that the word was used correctly. Any comments?
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Juliet+1
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Post by Juliet+1 »

I haven't found Dictionary.com to be very reliable. The sample sentence they gave you is not good. Hard to say whether it's actually "wrong." Try Merriam-Webster instead. They are more conservative about usage and will never lead you astray.
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emidio125
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Post by emidio125 »

I believe that sometimes correctness is defined according to the actual use of the term by people.
Your sentence doesn't seem to be wrong but it's odd. If you read it, you feel like it doesn't sound English alike. Did you consider that?
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