"much thought put into" vs "put much thought into"

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Scott
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"much thought put into" vs "put much thought into"

Post by Scott » 10 Jan 2019, 11:16

Are both the following grammatically correct or is one or both wrong:

1. "Robert has much thought put into this plan."

2. "Robert has put much thought into this plan."


If one is incorrect, why is it incorrect? What rule can we use to know how to properly order similar sentences? What other words besides "put" adhere to the same rule?
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Post by cpru68 » 10 Jan 2019, 13:55

I don't know how else to explain it, but my Grammarly flagged this as not grammatically correct. So, that is why I did not mark it as correct. Reading the two sentences as you have listed here, the first one seems to have more clarity to me than the second one. But, if that is just my opinion, then I think it shouldn't be counted as wrong, but as I said, it was flagged, so I marked it as incorrect.
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Post by CatInTheHat » 10 Jan 2019, 16:03

I find the first sentence awkward. The second, "put much thought into" is a common phrase. No idea about the technical rules.
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Post by Louanne Piccolo » 11 Jan 2019, 11:26

I was going to say they were both correct, but they mean different things until I reread it and saw that it wasn't written, "Robert has much thought put into HIS plan," but, "Robert has much thought put into THIS plan".

So, I'm going to say that the first is incorrect and the second correct.
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Post by bookowlie » 11 Jan 2019, 12:19

Neither sentence is technically wrong. I don't think editors should mark things right or wrong for the sole reason of running the review through Grammerly.
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Post by bookowlie » 11 Jan 2019, 12:21

I agree with CatintheHat that the first sentence is awkward. Still, it's not that bad, compared to other phrasing I've seen.
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Post by Eva Darrington » 11 Jan 2019, 21:06

I know of no rules about this particular situation with "put." However, the first sentence verges on creating a passive voice with "much thought put into this plan." https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/general_writ ... voice.html
Still, I don't think I would call this an error.

Sentence two is active voice and therefore is preferable. "Robert has put much thought into this plan." Robert is actively putting thought into the plan. It is a clearer communication. Grammarly often flags passive voice as an error. Not sure if that's what happened. For book reviews, I don't consider passive voice an error, but if overused, an editor may mention it.
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Post by Scott » 13 Jan 2019, 07:56

Using a passive voice certainly isn't grammatically incorrect, even though many automated spelling and grammar checkers flag it. So perhaps this goes to show why the automated tools, despite being helpful, cannot be relied on solely. They miss many things that errors and mark many things as errors that aren't. So they can help a human proofreader spot something that deserves extra attention, but they can't replace a human editor (at least with today's technology).
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