How to improve your sentence construction?

Some grammar rules (and embarrassing mistakes!) transcend the uniqueness of different regions and style guides. This new International Grammar section by OnlineBookClub.org ultimately identifies those rules thus providing a simple, flexible rule-set, respecting the differences between regions and style guides. You can feel free to ask general questions about spelling and grammar. You can also provide example sentences for other members to proofread and inform you of any grammar mistakes.
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Eteru
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How to improve your sentence construction?

Post by Eteru » 17 Nov 2018, 21:33

Can you lend some tips on improving your sentence construction? What are the important points that a writer must keep in mind? I do want to provide some best quality reviews, but I still lack in some aspects.

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jgraney8
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Post by jgraney8 » 22 Nov 2018, 23:59

You might find my post on the four types of sentences in the International Grammar section useful if you haven't already seen it. It may be more basic than what you are looking for.
“On the highest throne in the world, we still sit only on our own bottom.”
― Michel de Montaigne, The Complete Essays

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VandaQ
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Post by VandaQ » 23 Nov 2018, 03:46

Hi, I found that with sentence composition, it's a bit like Occam's razor: the simplest solution is the most probable one. So, the easiest construction is probably going to convey your idea better, as it takes less time to wrap your head around it. That doesn't mean you can't have complex sentences. One thing I would look out for is the connectives in a sentence, because their role is to link parts of a sentence and sentences together.

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Edwardsoi1213
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Post by Edwardsoi1213 » 06 Dec 2018, 06:11

Most people look for flashiest and most complicated sentences, I understand this due to our kind of work but the best and easiest way is to make it short and sweet which is quite a task because of the overthinking and re-checking the whole review but in my opinion its best not to overdo it.

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jgraney8
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Post by jgraney8 » 10 Dec 2018, 19:56

A general guideline I try to follow is to use simple and direct sentences to express main ideas. Supporting information sometimes calls for sentences that need additional support within them. For example, I might write this book makes a terrific argument for tolerance for my main idea. In the supporting information I might use a compound sentence to show two or three similar examples or a complex sentence for a hypothetical example. But always, I try to keep in the forefront the subject and verb of the clause no matter what kind of sentence I write.
“On the highest throne in the world, we still sit only on our own bottom.”
― Michel de Montaigne, The Complete Essays

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