Which Words Do You Always Spell Wrong?

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PlanetHauth
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Re: Which Words Do You Always Spell Wrong?

Post by PlanetHauth » 23 Jun 2018, 22:11

Lil Reads wrote:
22 Jun 2018, 23:32
PlanetHauth wrote:
16 Jun 2018, 00:11
I can not for the life of me ever remember how to spell restaurant without using spell-check or Google. I pride myself on my spelling abilities, but restaurant will be the death of me.
I swear the spelling of that word drives me up the wall; the first A is always the problem since it never seems to be pronounced in a way to indicate it belongs there so I forget it.
I never remember which A the U belongs to. :lol:
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Post by Lil Reads » 23 Jun 2018, 22:24

PlanetHauth wrote:
23 Jun 2018, 22:11
Lil Reads wrote:
22 Jun 2018, 23:32
PlanetHauth wrote:
16 Jun 2018, 00:11
I can not for the life of me ever remember how to spell restaurant without using spell-check or Google. I pride myself on my spelling abilities, but restaurant will be the death of me.
I swear the spelling of that word drives me up the wall; the first A is always the problem since it never seems to be pronounced in a way to indicate it belongs there so I forget it.
I never remember which A the U belongs to. :lol:
Actually,that spelling would make more sense considering how it is pronounced sometimes (rest u rAUnt) ... :eusa-think:
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Post by PlanetHauth » 24 Jun 2018, 19:59

Lil Reads wrote:
23 Jun 2018, 22:24
PlanetHauth wrote:
23 Jun 2018, 22:11
Lil Reads wrote:
22 Jun 2018, 23:32


I swear the spelling of that word drives me up the wall; the first A is always the problem since it never seems to be pronounced in a way to indicate it belongs there so I forget it.
I never remember which A the U belongs to. :lol:
Actually,that spelling would make more sense considering how it is pronounced sometimes (rest u rAUnt) ... :eusa-think:
I think so!
“Don’t adventures ever have an end? I suppose not. Someone else always has to carry on the story.”
-Bilbo Baggins

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Post by Lil Reads » 25 Jun 2018, 10:40

PlanetHauth wrote:
24 Jun 2018, 19:59
Lil Reads wrote:
23 Jun 2018, 22:24
PlanetHauth wrote:
23 Jun 2018, 22:11


I never remember which A the U belongs to. :lol:
Actually,that spelling would make more sense considering how it is pronounced sometimes (rest u rAUnt) ... :eusa-think:
I think so!
Thanks.

:D I think words like that are part of the reason people struggle with spelling - the pronunciation does not correspond to what is written! It might also be why auto-correct was invented. :lol:
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Post by MatthewSteele » 25 Jun 2018, 11:34

'Receive'! For some reason I just can't get the i before e rule down. I also have the toughest time with 'Definitely'.

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Post by PlanetHauth » 25 Jun 2018, 22:58

Lil Reads wrote:
25 Jun 2018, 10:40
PlanetHauth wrote:
24 Jun 2018, 19:59
Lil Reads wrote:
23 Jun 2018, 22:24


Actually,that spelling would make more sense considering how it is pronounced sometimes (rest u rAUnt) ... :eusa-think:
I think so!
Thanks.

:D I think words like that are part of the reason people struggle with spelling - the pronunciation does not correspond to what is written! It might also be why auto-correct was invented. :lol:
It's definitely part of why learning English is so difficult. Granted, part of learning English is realizing that a lot of this language is borrowed from other languages, and that's part of the pronunciation discrepancy. However, as I work on learning Japanese, I've come to appreciate their system. Kanji is kind of difficult to learn, and the social nuances of the language are too, but you can be sure that the pronunciation is the same across the board. To me, that makes it a little bit easier to learn, because once you've got the syllabaries down, you're not struggling to learn vocabulary, stroke order, grammar, and a million different pronunciations.
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Post by Lil Reads » 26 Jun 2018, 10:51

PlanetHauth wrote:
25 Jun 2018, 22:58
Lil Reads wrote:
25 Jun 2018, 10:40
PlanetHauth wrote:
24 Jun 2018, 19:59


I think so!
Thanks.

:D I think words like that are part of the reason people struggle with spelling - the pronunciation does not correspond to what is written! It might also be why auto-correct was invented. :lol:
It's definitely part of why learning English is so difficult. Granted, part of learning English is realizing that a lot of this language is borrowed from other languages, and that's part of the pronunciation discrepancy. However, as I work on learning Japanese, I've come to appreciate their system. Kanji is kind of difficult to learn, and the social nuances of the language are too, but you can be sure that the pronunciation is the same across the board. To me, that makes it a little bit easier to learn, because once you've got the syllabaries down, you're not struggling to learn vocabulary, stroke order, grammar, and a million different pronunciations.
There was this joke I heard from a teacher years ago - English beats up other languages and looks in the pocket for spare vocabulary. :lol2:

The pronunciation discrepancy is so weird, especially when you add in accents! I swear some of my classmates who moved from other states pronounced "awkward" like it had a Q - "AwQuard"!

That's really impressive. I struggled with Russian so I'd never be able to learn kanji. I might be remembering this wrong, but can something entirely change meaning depending on context with kanji? So you would have a kanji and you have to remember "When used here it means this, but when used there it means that or when used like so it means something entirely different"?
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Post by PlanetHauth » 26 Jun 2018, 21:34

Lil Reads wrote:
26 Jun 2018, 10:51
PlanetHauth wrote:
25 Jun 2018, 22:58
Lil Reads wrote:
25 Jun 2018, 10:40


Thanks.

:D I think words like that are part of the reason people struggle with spelling - the pronunciation does not correspond to what is written! It might also be why auto-correct was invented. :lol:
It's definitely part of why learning English is so difficult. Granted, part of learning English is realizing that a lot of this language is borrowed from other languages, and that's part of the pronunciation discrepancy. However, as I work on learning Japanese, I've come to appreciate their system. Kanji is kind of difficult to learn, and the social nuances of the language are too, but you can be sure that the pronunciation is the same across the board. To me, that makes it a little bit easier to learn, because once you've got the syllabaries down, you're not struggling to learn vocabulary, stroke order, grammar, and a million different pronunciations.
There was this joke I heard from a teacher years ago - English beats up other languages and looks in the pocket for spare vocabulary. :lol2:

The pronunciation discrepancy is so weird, especially when you add in accents! I swear some of my classmates who moved from other states pronounced "awkward" like it had a Q - "AwQuard"!

That's really impressive. I struggled with Russian so I'd never be able to learn kanji. I might be remembering this wrong, but can something entirely change meaning depending on context with kanji? So you would have a kanji and you have to remember "When used here it means this, but when used there it means that or when used like so it means something entirely different"?
That joke is a pretty accurate description of English, I'd say :lol:

Yes, regional variances make it difficult too. I spent about a year in New Jersey as a kid, then moved to Alabama (having lived in Florida, Georgia, and Kentucky before NJ). I picked up a southern accent on certain words, but I've had a lot of people remark that they can't hear the southern accent as much, that it's definitely mixed with a northern accent. I personally don't hear it, but I do know I don't pronounce things with that deep-woods southern accent.

I'm not far into my Japanese studies, but that's what I've gathered, yes. I'll post the link below, but I ran across a pretty good explanation and example about it.The short of it is in one sentence, a kanji is used to mean head (the one attached to your shoulders), but in another the same kanji is used to mean the head of the children (think in terms of head of the household/leader of the pack), meaning he is the oldest of the group of kids. The link for the full, more knowledgeable explanation is here: Kanji With Different Readings

If you want to look at other kanji and their meanings, I'd suggest https://Jisho.org. You can type in English words and see what kanji pops up.
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Post by Lil Reads » 28 Jun 2018, 16:40

PlanetHauth wrote:
26 Jun 2018, 21:34
Lil Reads wrote:
26 Jun 2018, 10:51
PlanetHauth wrote:
25 Jun 2018, 22:58


It's definitely part of why learning English is so difficult. Granted, part of learning English is realizing that a lot of this language is borrowed from other languages, and that's part of the pronunciation discrepancy. However, as I work on learning Japanese, I've come to appreciate their system. Kanji is kind of difficult to learn, and the social nuances of the language are too, but you can be sure that the pronunciation is the same across the board. To me, that makes it a little bit easier to learn, because once you've got the syllabaries down, you're not struggling to learn vocabulary, stroke order, grammar, and a million different pronunciations.
There was this joke I heard from a teacher years ago - English beats up other languages and looks in the pocket for spare vocabulary. :lol2:

The pronunciation discrepancy is so weird, especially when you add in accents! I swear some of my classmates who moved from other states pronounced "awkward" like it had a Q - "AwQuard"!

That's really impressive. I struggled with Russian so I'd never be able to learn kanji. I might be remembering this wrong, but can something entirely change meaning depending on context with kanji? So you would have a kanji and you have to remember "When used here it means this, but when used there it means that or when used like so it means something entirely different"?
That joke is a pretty accurate description of English, I'd say :lol:

Yes, regional variances make it difficult too. I spent about a year in New Jersey as a kid, then moved to Alabama (having lived in Florida, Georgia, and Kentucky before NJ). I picked up a southern accent on certain words, but I've had a lot of people remark that they can't hear the southern accent as much, that it's definitely mixed with a northern accent. I personally don't hear it, but I do know I don't pronounce things with that deep-woods southern accent.

I'm not far into my Japanese studies, but that's what I've gathered, yes. I'll post the link below, but I ran across a pretty good explanation and example about it.The short of it is in one sentence, a kanji is used to mean head (the one attached to your shoulders), but in another the same kanji is used to mean the head of the children (think in terms of head of the household/leader of the pack), meaning he is the oldest of the group of kids. The link for the full, more knowledgeable explanation is here: Kanji With Different Readings

If you want to look at other kanji and their meanings, I'd suggest https://Jisho.org. You can type in English words and see what kanji pops up.
:lol: That teacher was great; sometimes she reassured us that the rules of English were odd and even she struggled with some of them.

My accent is a bit odd too; even though I have lived in the same place all my life, so many of the adults I grew up around had moved from different places and I grew up watching British comedies or reading British books, I tend to use more European syntax.

Oooohh thanks for the links! I always struggle with finding good websites for language learning. I'll be going through those ASAP.
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Post by PlanetHauth » 28 Jun 2018, 21:53

Lil Reads wrote:
28 Jun 2018, 16:40
PlanetHauth wrote:
26 Jun 2018, 21:34
Lil Reads wrote:
26 Jun 2018, 10:51


There was this joke I heard from a teacher years ago - English beats up other languages and looks in the pocket for spare vocabulary. :lol2:

The pronunciation discrepancy is so weird, especially when you add in accents! I swear some of my classmates who moved from other states pronounced "awkward" like it had a Q - "AwQuard"!

That's really impressive. I struggled with Russian so I'd never be able to learn kanji. I might be remembering this wrong, but can something entirely change meaning depending on context with kanji? So you would have a kanji and you have to remember "When used here it means this, but when used there it means that or when used like so it means something entirely different"?
That joke is a pretty accurate description of English, I'd say :lol:

Yes, regional variances make it difficult too. I spent about a year in New Jersey as a kid, then moved to Alabama (having lived in Florida, Georgia, and Kentucky before NJ). I picked up a southern accent on certain words, but I've had a lot of people remark that they can't hear the southern accent as much, that it's definitely mixed with a northern accent. I personally don't hear it, but I do know I don't pronounce things with that deep-woods southern accent.

I'm not far into my Japanese studies, but that's what I've gathered, yes. I'll post the link below, but I ran across a pretty good explanation and example about it.The short of it is in one sentence, a kanji is used to mean head (the one attached to your shoulders), but in another the same kanji is used to mean the head of the children (think in terms of head of the household/leader of the pack), meaning he is the oldest of the group of kids. The link for the full, more knowledgeable explanation is here: Kanji With Different Readings

If you want to look at other kanji and their meanings, I'd suggest https://Jisho.org. You can type in English words and see what kanji pops up.
:lol: That teacher was great; sometimes she reassured us that the rules of English were odd and even she struggled with some of them.

My accent is a bit odd too; even though I have lived in the same place all my life, so many of the adults I grew up around had moved from different places and I grew up watching British comedies or reading British books, I tend to use more European syntax.

Oooohh thanks for the links! I always struggle with finding good websites for language learning. I'll be going through those ASAP.
No problem! The Kanji With Different Readings comes from Tae Kim's blog, and he seems to be one of the top Japanese teachers people recommend when you're trying to learn on your own. He appears to be pretty knowledgeable (I apparently can't spell knowledgeable without autocorrect either :eusa-think:) and explains things in a fairly simple manner.
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Post by Lil Reads » 29 Jun 2018, 10:52

I'll have to look more of his work up; I struggled learning Spanish and Russian in school, so maybe a self learning course might help.

Knowledgeable is another kid of odd word too with the E and A together; I swear there are words were the E would be dropped. :eusa-think:
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Post by Ant » 13 Jul 2018, 14:00

Speling, I never realy have any trouble with it.

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cyrus kinyua mwangi
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Post by cyrus kinyua mwangi » 13 Jul 2018, 14:14

i had the wrong spelling of success in primary and secondary schools, i write one c,it cost me valuable marks in composition class work and exams

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