Is Corey too Good to be realistic charster

Discuss the March 2015 book of the month, "Forever Twelve" by Meg Kimball.
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michelewhite0068
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Is Corey too Good to be realistic charster

Post by michelewhite0068 » 03 Mar 2015, 03:05

Although I really enjoyed this wonderfully crafted novel, I wonder how other readers viewed the character of Corey. Does she seem to be too nice to be a realistic pre-teen? Although, Corey's world is fraught with some other characters facing serious consequences for their problematic choices, Corey, on the other hand, seems to be almost devoid of character flaws. And, on the other hand seems more real in dealing with her own issues. Corey is a likable character. But I was wondering what your thoughts are in this matter? I would l love to know I you think abou Courey va.Amdi. which character
Do you identify with :twisted:
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Post by Scott » 03 Mar 2015, 12:58

Great question :)

I definitely felt a little bit of what you are saying. I also noticed it in the way Corey and her mother interacted. I would have liked to see more conflict there. Maybe not even conflict exactly but something with a little more of the imperfections of real life.

On the other hand, I suspect some what the author was aiming for was giving Corey that sort of happy-go-lucky, careless attitude to capture the 12-year-old-spirit.
"That virtue we appreciate is as much ours as another's. We see so much only as we possess." - Henry David Thoreau

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Post by Lisalovecraft » 03 Mar 2015, 21:46

I agree, Corey is too good to be true. I feel like her mom is too, and so is their relationship! I thought that was the point of the book, that this is a perfect, feel good world. That's the impression I got from the summary.

I am enjoying it, but it also makes me feel wistful. It would be nice if this was like real life. Seventh grade is a weird, awkward time of life. It is the cusp of childhood to adolescence. My son is twelve and in seventh grade..I know it can be rough for him. If only things were as nice as they are in Forever Twelve!

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Post by michelewhite0068 » 03 Mar 2015, 22:07

Although I think that Corey is too good, I found Andi to balance this out a little. I would have enjoyed reading about Andi's perspective more. Perhaps if their adventures continue Meg Kimbell might write it more evenly between Corey and Andi. I would look forward to reading about these two young ladies in the future. I did enjoy the novel that much. I also agree that Corey's mother seemed to emotionally well balanced considering the issues she has with her own mother and being that she is a single mother.
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Post by NellySites » 05 Mar 2015, 12:13

I think her wholesomeness and naivety give the author the ability to add more dimension to the book. For instance, if Corey was already a experienced kisser with the inability to forgive she would be Andi. Also, this allows the author to bring up more of the twelve year old problems within the book. If she would have already experienced them she would not need to struggle through them. I liked how good she was.

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Post by michelewhite0068 » 05 Mar 2015, 12:28

Nice point Nellysites! I found it interesting that Corey comes from a home where there is no father figure; and yet, she does not have any issues that most people would deal with. Like picking the wrong kind of boy to like, or struggle herself with seeking the attention of boys more so than the typical twelve year old. However, that being said, I really loved the book and highly recommend it to other readers. Meg is a very talented writer who breaths live into her characters and the plot was solid.
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Post by Lisalovecraft » 05 Mar 2015, 19:52

Ok, I just finished this. I think my opinion changed a bit after reading the second half of the book. I loved Corey, and I think her character progressed and grew throughout the book. She was definitely more self aware and flawed in part four, and I felt this section showed her transitioning from childhood to adolescence. It seems like her mom sheltered her from some of the more harsh realities of life until later in the story. I think that while Corey and her mom don't have many flaws, they are still well-developed characters. We're they realistic? I don't know, but I would like to think that there are people like that in the world.

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Post by csimmons032 » 05 Mar 2015, 20:06

There are a lot of teenagers out there who have a lot of attitude, but I am sure that there are some out there who don't. It just might be kind of difficult and rare to find them. I do agree that Corey should have had to deal with more conflicts to make it seem more realistic, and I would have liked to have read more from Andi's point of view as well. I though both kids were very likable characters.

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Post by michelewhite0068 » 05 Mar 2015, 21:27

I agree that both characters were charming in their own ways. I would also have enjoyed reading more about Andi's viewpoint, but perhaps that might happen in the next novel [hint, hint--we want more Meg!] I also agree that the humor in the novel, especially from Corey's English teacher and from Corey's mother did a lot to soften a world that might seem a lot more hostile to Corey. I liked how Meg dealt with Corey's feelings about her father. I thought that she was very slick in that department.
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Post by mmandy38 » 06 Mar 2015, 13:31

michelewhite0068 wrote:Although I really enjoyed this wonderfully crafted novel, I wonder how other readers viewed the character of Corey. Does she seem to be too nice to be a realistic pre-teen? Although, Corey's world is fraught with some other characters facing serious consequences for their problematic choices, Corey, on the other hand, seems to be almost devoid of character flaws. And, on the other hand seems more real in dealing with her own issues. Corey is a likable character. But I was wondering what your thoughts are in this matter? I would l love to know I you think abou Courey va.Amdi. which character
Do you identify with :twisted:
She wasn't a preteen, she was only twelve and a half lol. I don't know that her niceness is unrealistic at twelve, but maybe her naivety was a little bit.

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Post by Jesska6029 » 07 Mar 2015, 13:05

csimmons032 wrote:There are a lot of teenagers out there who have a lot of attitude, but I am sure that there are some out there who don't. It just might be kind of difficult and rare to find them. I do agree that Corey should have had to deal with more conflicts to make it seem more realistic, and I would have liked to have read more from Andi's point of view as well. I though both kids were very likable characters.

I agree that attitude almost always comes with pre-teens and teens. I do believe that Corey acts in ways that sometimes does not reflect the typical girl her age, but she does encounter issues that many girls her age do face in reality. I believe her response to all situations makes her a great female role model for young ladies. I am a person who loves flawed protagonists, but I think it is best that Corey lacks most of these flaws.
“Some failure in life is inevitable. It is impossible to live without failing at something, unless you live so cautiously that you might as well not have lived at all—in which case, you fail by default.” ~J.K. Rowling

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Post by krisliz88 » 10 Mar 2015, 10:40

michelewhite0068 wrote:Although I really enjoyed this wonderfully crafted novel, I wonder how other readers viewed the character of Corey. Does she seem to be too nice to be a realistic pre-teen? Although, Corey's world is fraught with some other characters facing serious consequences for their problematic choices, Corey, on the other hand, seems to be almost devoid of character flaws. And, on the other hand seems more real in dealing with her own issues. Corey is a likable character. But I was wondering what your thoughts are in this matter? I would l love to know I you think abou Courey va.Amdi. which character
Do you identify with :twisted:
I thought about this a few times when I was reading this book but then little instances would come up when you could see Corey's preteen behavior come out. I think that Corey was designed to be a character that was old than she really is. Her mother is eager for her to be just a 12 year old so she may indulge in her a little bit more which is where the lack of conflict comes from. However, one scene that comes to mind is when Corey was sick and basically complaining about everything. This shows Corey's age as in a lot of ways she is disrespectful to her mother during those scenes. Corey overall is a good kid, though, and I think that is why Corey's mother lets her slide.

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Post by Jojowrites4All » 10 Mar 2015, 19:32

Corey was very mature in how she dealt with resolving problems for other people. Actually, it was refreshing to absorb, because in reality follower the leader is wide spread. However, she couldn't deal with some of the issues that Andi spoke of. Andi was probably learning from Aunt Berry. I was glad to see the creative restraint by the author in terms of Corey.Now, when Corey was being a bratty 12 year old it was very annoying. It was times that I wasn't pleased with her attitude towards her mom. Corey was the character that made the story relatable to older kids and adults.
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Post by Scorsee » 19 Mar 2015, 18:14

I actually noticed a lot of parallels between Corey and my niece. She has a similar attitude toward life that Corey demonstrates and has the same care-free charm. But, at the same time, is able to grapple with the realities of life and work through complicated problems. I do agree with some of the other comments that perhaps Corey and her Mom's relationship is a little to evenly cast. However, I have known people who grew up with one parent and were able to forge a similarly close relationship that allows for openness and little conflict. The way that the author portrayed Corey's attitude when annoyed was absurdly accurate to my experiences with my niece. I'm thinking about recommending the book to her. She seemed intrigued by the idea of a book with central characters her age grappling with everyday issues.
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Post by ALynnPowers » 25 Mar 2015, 10:21

I personally adored Corey... but it might be my bias... she is almost an exact replica of me when I was that age! Except, well, she is a bit less of a drama queen, but maybe even a bit more immature. I feel saying weird that because I think Corey was a pretty mature girl. But still.... some typical 12 year old immaturity came out, but in a cute way. Her mom, on the other hand, seemed too good to be true. BUT... I also think that could just because I saw the mom through Corey's eyes, and she was still in that phase where her mother is the greatest thing to ever walk the planet. Anyway, that's what I got. 8)

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