Review by BookReader+6 -- The Warramunga's War

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HollandBlue
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Review by BookReader+6 -- The Warramunga's War

Post by HollandBlue » 17 Aug 2018, 10:25

[Following is a volunteer review of "The Warramunga's War" by Greg Kater.]
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4 out of 4 stars
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The Warramunga's War by Greg Kater is a gripping story from the first page. Following the adventures of Jamie and Jacko, a pair of war buddies, from the frontlines in Syria during WWII, to the streets of Cairo, and finally to post-war Australia; this book is thoroughly action-packed and entertaining. The suspense starts in Syria where the two friends meet. Jamie is bewildered by his warramunga friend's strange talents. As the plot moves along, the friends find themselves in Cairo working as spys who uncover and neutralize German agents. Along with a cast of unique characters, they are also involved in a subplot of unsolved murders. The team works methodically to undermine the Germans and solve the mysterious murders. While in Cairo, Jacko becomes entangled in a wartime romance. Following the war, the duo heads for Australia where more adventure awaits them.

The main characters in the story are well-developed, as are the supporting characters. The settings are so descriptive that I felt like I was in them, and was able to picture them clearly in my mind. I really like how the book gives a subtle history lesson; I learned more from this story than I ever learned in school. Even though it's filled with historical information, the book is a real page-turner and hard to put down. It's about three hundred pages long and I finished it in less than a week.

Greg Kater's writing style hooks the reader on page one and the suspense never stops. There is a thorough follow-up of all the plots and subplots in the book. Nothing is left unanswered.

The elements of both humor and sadness are found in the story. There are easy transitions between the chapters, and the story is easy to follow even though it is intense.

The only thing that I found distracted from the story is the way that Jacko's sister, Sarah, spoke. Her colloquial dialect slowed down the pace of the story a little. Fortunately, I was able to figure out what she was saying by the way the sentences following her conversations flowed.

Towards the end of the novel, there are still surprises that need to be discovered.
I would definately recommend this book to those readers that enjoy historical fiction. I would also encourage anyone who likes intrigue and mystery with a little romance thrown in to read it. I rank this book a 4 out of 4 stars! The editing of this book was very thorough and the story was really easy to read. This is one of the best books I've read in a long time, and I would highly recommend it to anyone looking for an entertaining read!

******
The Warramunga's War
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Cassandra Keeney
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Post by Cassandra Keeney » 31 Aug 2018, 13:02

You gave an honest review, and it has me wanting to read the book! I think a book that can add in humor alongside more difficult emotions is often worth my time. It is good to know that even with the difficulties understanding a character's dialogue, the context is well enough to fix that.
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Post by Sen_Suzumiya » 31 Aug 2018, 17:18

This book is not my cup of tea. Thank you for this wonderful review it gave me a good idea of the book!
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HollandBlue
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Post by HollandBlue » 06 Sep 2018, 09:42

csswan wrote:
31 Aug 2018, 13:02
You gave an honest review, and it has me wanting to read the book! I think a book that can add in humor alongside more difficult emotions is often worth my time. It is good to know that even with the difficulties understanding a character's dialogue, the context is well enough to fix that.
I really enjoyed this book and hope you like it too. There is a bit of humor in the book. The parts where the dialogue is hard to understand are brief and followed by descriptive text.
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HollandBlue
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Post by HollandBlue » 06 Sep 2018, 09:45

Sen_Suzumiya wrote:
31 Aug 2018, 17:18
This book is not my cup of tea. Thank you for this wonderful review it gave me a good idea of the book!
Sorry to see you won't be reading the book, I found it to be quite entertaining, but historical fiction isn't for everyone.
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Post by FictionLover » 11 Sep 2018, 06:58

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4 out of 4 stars
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The Warramunga's War by Greg Kater is a gripping story from the first page. Following the adventures of Jamie and Jacko, a pair of war buddies, from the frontlines in Syria during WWII, to the streets of Cairo, and finally to post-war Australia; this book is thoroughly action-packed and entertaining. The suspense starts in Syria where the two friends meet. Jamie is bewildered by his warramunga friend's strange talents. As the plot moves along, the friends find themselves in Cairo working as spys who uncover and neutralize German agents. Along with a cast of unique characters, they are also involved in a subplot of unsolved murders. The team works methodically to undermine the Germans and solve the mysterious murders. While in Cairo, Jacko becomes entangled in a wartime romance. Following the war, the duo heads for Australia where more adventure awaits them.

Great review. I love your style of summarizing the plot. I have such a hard time with that part of the review.

I thought Mr. Kater did a good job with this too. I thought both of his settings were really well visualized. Though, in my review, I mention how I could have done without all the meals and coffee drinking.

Cheers,

:coffee1-smiley:
"I love reading another reader’s list of favorites. Even when I find I do not share their tastes or predilections, I am provoked to compare, contrast, and contradict. It is a most healthy exercise, and one altogether fruitful." T.S. Eliot

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Post by HollandBlue » 15 Sep 2018, 10:46

FictionLover wrote:
11 Sep 2018, 06:58
Book Cover
4 out of 4 stars
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The Warramunga's War by Greg Kater is a gripping story from the first page. Following the adventures of Jamie and Jacko, a pair of war buddies, from the frontlines in Syria during WWII, to the streets of Cairo, and finally to post-war Australia; this book is thoroughly action-packed and entertaining. The suspense starts in Syria where the two friends meet. Jamie is bewildered by his warramunga friend's strange talents. As the plot moves along, the friends find themselves in Cairo working as spys who uncover and neutralize German agents. Along with a cast of unique characters, they are also involved in a subplot of unsolved murders. The team works methodically to undermine the Germans and solve the mysterious murders. While in Cairo, Jacko becomes entangled in a wartime romance. Following the war, the duo heads for Australia where more adventure awaits them.

Great review. I love your style of summarizing the plot. I have such a hard time with that part of the review.

I thought Mr. Kater did a good job with this too. I thought both of his settings were really well visualized. Though, in my review, I mention how I could have done without all the meals and coffee drinking.

Cheers,

:coffee1-smiley:
Agreed! Check out Krater's new book 'Skills of the Warramunga!'
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Post by FictionLover » 16 Sep 2018, 07:46

BookReader+6 wrote:
15 Sep 2018, 10:46
FictionLover wrote:
11 Sep 2018, 06:58
Book Cover
4 out of 4 stars
Share This Review


The Warramunga's War by Greg Kater is a gripping story from the first page. Following the adventures of Jamie and Jacko, a pair of war buddies, from the frontlines in Syria during WWII, to the streets of Cairo, and finally to post-war Australia; this book is thoroughly action-packed and entertaining. The suspense starts in Syria where the two friends meet. Jamie is bewildered by his warramunga friend's strange talents. As the plot moves along, the friends find themselves in Cairo working as spys who uncover and neutralize German agents. Along with a cast of unique characters, they are also involved in a subplot of unsolved murders. The team works methodically to undermine the Germans and solve the mysterious murders. While in Cairo, Jacko becomes entangled in a wartime romance. Following the war, the duo heads for Australia where more adventure awaits them.

Great review. I love your style of summarizing the plot. I have such a hard time with that part of the review.

I thought Mr. Kater did a good job with this too. I thought both of his settings were really well visualized. Though, in my review, I mention how I could have done without all the meals and coffee drinking.

Cheers,

:coffee1-smiley:
Agreed! Check out Krater's new book 'Skills of the Warramunga!'
I still haven't gotten to the Warramunga's Aftermath of War, which I got on .pdf when it was BOTD. Short on time. I belong to a book club and we are reading A Study in Scarlet, which I really want to get to over the next 2 weeks.

:tiphat: :tiphat:
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Post by HollandBlue » 16 Sep 2018, 12:16

FictionLover wrote:
16 Sep 2018, 07:46
BookReader+6 wrote:
15 Sep 2018, 10:46
FictionLover wrote:
11 Sep 2018, 06:58


Great review. I love your style of summarizing the plot. I have such a hard time with that part of the review.

I thought Mr. Kater did a good job with this too. I thought both of his settings were really well visualized. Though, in my review, I mention how I could have done without all the meals and coffee drinking.

Cheers,

:coffee1-smiley:
Agreed! Check out Krater's new book 'Skills of the Warramunga!'
I still haven't gotten to the Warramunga's Aftermath of War, which I got on .pdf when it was BOTD. Short on time. I belong to a book club and we are reading A Study in Scarlet, which I really want to get to over the next 2 weeks.

:tiphat: :tiphat:
Enjoy your reading! I skipped Warramunga's Aftermath of War because it dealt with human trafficking and I wasn't comfortable with that subject.
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Post by FictionLover » 16 Sep 2018, 14:26

BookReader+6 wrote:
16 Sep 2018, 12:16
FictionLover wrote:
16 Sep 2018, 07:46
BookReader+6 wrote:
15 Sep 2018, 10:46

Agreed! Check out Krater's new book 'Skills of the Warramunga!'
I still haven't gotten to the Warramunga's Aftermath of War, which I got on .pdf when it was BOTD. Short on time. I belong to a book club and we are reading A Study in Scarlet, which I really want to get to over the next 2 weeks.

:tiphat: :tiphat:
Enjoy your reading! I skipped Warramunga's Aftermath of War because it dealt with human trafficking and I wasn't comfortable with that subject.
Oh, yeah, I can understand that. I forgot about that.
"I love reading another reader’s list of favorites. Even when I find I do not share their tastes or predilections, I am provoked to compare, contrast, and contradict. It is a most healthy exercise, and one altogether fruitful." T.S. Eliot

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Post by HollandBlue » 17 Sep 2018, 07:40

FictionLover wrote:
16 Sep 2018, 14:26
BookReader+6 wrote:
16 Sep 2018, 12:16
FictionLover wrote:
16 Sep 2018, 07:46


I still haven't gotten to the Warramunga's Aftermath of War, which I got on .pdf when it was BOTD. Short on time. I belong to a book club and we are reading A Study in Scarlet, which I really want to get to over the next 2 weeks.

:tiphat: :tiphat:
Enjoy your reading! I skipped Warramunga's Aftermath of War because it dealt with human trafficking and I wasn't comfortable with that subject.
Oh, yeah, I can understand that. I forgot about that.
It's probably still a good book if the trafficking doesn't bother you. Will read your review if you choose to read it at some point, and maybe I'll add it to my shelves.
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Post by jcoad » 19 Sep 2018, 21:16

I enjoyed the Australia portion of this book better than the Cairo portion. I thought the entire spy story ended way to quickly for spending half a book writing about it. I agree about Jacko's sister, trying to figure out what she was saying was difficult. I'm torn regarding if I'm going to read the second book or not. Thanks for the great review!

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Post by HollandBlue » 20 Sep 2018, 07:19

jcoad wrote:
19 Sep 2018, 21:16
I enjoyed the Australia portion of this book better than the Cairo portion. I thought the entire spy story ended way to quickly for spending half a book writing about it. I agree about Jacko's sister, trying to figure out what she was saying was difficult. I'm torn regarding if I'm going to read the second book or not. Thanks for the great review!

Interesting that you enjoyed the Australian portion of the book better. While I was reading it I liked the Cairo portion, but looking back I remember the Australian part better. If you read the second book, I'd like to read your review of it.
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