Review by Beatus -- The Vanished by Pejay Bradley

This forum is for volunteer reviews by members of our review team. These reviews are done voluntarily by the reviewers and are published in this forum, separate from the official professional reviews. These reviews are kept separate primarily because the same book may be reviewed by many different reviewers.
Forum rules
Authors and publishers are not able to post replies in the review topics.
Post Reply
Beatus
Posts: 807
Joined: 21 Jun 2017, 10:41
Currently Reading: Homicide
Bookshelf Size: 58
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-beatus.html
Latest Review: Man's 4th Best Hospital by Samuel Shem

Review by Beatus -- The Vanished by Pejay Bradley

Post by Beatus »

[Following is a volunteer review of "The Vanished" by Pejay Bradley.]
Book Cover
4 out of 4 stars
Share This Review


I have to rate The Vanished by Pejay Bradley 4 out of 4 stars. The reasons being the book's brilliant arrangement, errorless narration, and outstanding presentation. I never expected that I would enjoy this book when I picked it. However, it proved me wrong. I loved every page of every chapter. It is a historical fiction story about the Japanese annexation of Korea in the early 1900s. The guerrilla efforts to regain Korea's sovereignty and Japan's tactics to control the Korean population caused so much bloodshed. Therefore, readers should be aware, especially if gruesome scenes and death are upsetting to them.

The Vanished by Pejay Bradley delves into Korea's culture in the middle of political uncertainty caused by its annexation to Japan. The author meticulously built the characters to match their roles perfectly. I was moved to the core by the characters' frustration and loneliness resulting from the cultural principles, particularly the women. While reading this book, I realized that the strict rules of matchmaking and women's precarious position in Korean patriarchal society mirror what is currently happening in Africa. A housewife in Korean society is like a housemaid only with her husband's last name, as is in most African cultures.

The story's protagonist is Lady Sougyon, daughter of Prince Aansoon. At a very young age, she got married to a stranger picked by her father, as was the custom. The only good thing about the marriage was her handsome, intelligent son, Embon. As an estranged wife, she tried everything in her power to make a man out of her child. The question is, will the lazy, entitled son realize his purpose in life?

The author made the story so real, like she was in the middle of all that was happening. This book has nothing to dislike as its fantastic cover, structure, and the author's gentle writing style made it look great and fun to read. The author seems to have engaged professional editors to avoid any mistakes, for I found none. I recommend this book to fans of historical fiction focused on culture and struggles for independence.

The cliffhanger ending is superb. I believe the author has something in store for her readers. Embon, grief-stricken, weak, and in need to prove himself worthy and better than his drunk, good-for-nothing father, is the character any reader would wish to meet again. The Vanished by Pejay Bradley is the best book of its kind, and I will be the first in line if the author debuts Part 2.

******
The Vanished
View: on Bookshelves | on Amazon
User avatar
Florence Nalianya
Posts: 629
Joined: 24 Jun 2019, 10:33
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 82
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-florence-nalianya.html
Latest Review: The Prodigy Slave, Book One: Journey to Winter Garden by Londyn Skye

Post by Florence Nalianya »

Thanks for a powerful review.I don't fancy historical reads but the manner in which this one is delivered is quite inspiring.
User avatar
InStoree
Previous Member of the Month
Posts: 1706
Joined: 04 Jan 2019, 14:59
2021 Reading Goal: 40
Currently Reading: Casino Chronicle
Bookshelf Size: 173
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-instoree.html
Latest Review: Fascination So Wild by Joyce Beck

Post by InStoree »

Thanks to your review, I now consider Korean culture for future reading, and this book seems to touch on some interesting aspects of discrimination against women. Also, Embon seems a determined character who I would love to learn more about him.
Love is the only power out there that trumps hatred, grief, sadness, or anger.
- Tayma Tameem
User avatar
Mtibza eM
Posts: 291
Joined: 11 Jun 2020, 13:27
2021 Reading Goal: 66
Favorite Book:
Currently Reading: The Not So Great American Novel
Bookshelf Size: 32
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-mtibza-em.html
Latest Review: The Trafficking Murders by Brian O'Hare

Post by Mtibza eM »

Thank you for your honest review. It was well written and I enjoyed reading it. I am glad that you also rated it a full stars, just like me.
User avatar
Lunastella
Previous Member of the Month
Posts: 2498
Joined: 27 Apr 2018, 16:22
2021 Reading Goal: 100
Currently Reading: My Not-So Secret
Bookshelf Size: 1991
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-lunastella.html
Latest Review: Depression Where by Briana Isham

Post by Lunastella »

I was moved to the core by the characters' frustration and loneliness resulting from the cultural principles, particularly the women. While reading this book, I realized that the strict rules of matchmaking and women's precarious position in Korean patriarchal society mirror what is currently happening in Africa. A housewife in Korean society is like a housemaid only with her husband's last name, as is in most African cultures.
Is that so? I didn't know that it happened in Africa too. I guess patriarchal societies are all over the world. How sad!
I reviewed the book too, but never considered the ending a cliffhanger. You're right! That's why there are so many loose ends.
Great review!
Post Reply

Return to “Volunteer Reviews”