Official Review: The Vanished by Pejay Bradley

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inaramid
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Official Review: The Vanished by Pejay Bradley

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[Following is an official OnlineBookClub.org review of "The Vanished" by Pejay Bradley.]
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3 out of 4 stars
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The Vanished, Pejay Bradley’s riveting historical novel, brings readers back to a bygone time when Koreans were “a people without a nation.” The story spans a period of nearly two decades, following the life of Kim Embon (“Em” means forest and “Bon,” prosperity), the sheltered son of a Korean elite. Though born at a period of political turmoil, a volatile time when Korea is struggling to break free from Japanese rule, Embon enjoys a life of privilege under the watchful eyes of his mother, Lady Sougyon, the daughter of a prince. When Embon decides to study in Japan, he meets a group of young revolutionaries-in-the-making who opens his eyes to the social disparities in their country and inspires in him a longing for freedom, whatever the cost may be.

The story unfolds through the eyes of several characters, all of whom are tied to Embon in some way. Through them, we are plunged into the sociohistorical landscape of Korea at the turn of the 20th century. There’s a staggering wealth of Korean culture and history within the pages, covering everything from the evolving roles of women in this era, the intricacies of arranged marriage, the decline of the elite, the brazen acts of violence committed by Japanese authorities against the Korean people, and of course, the struggle for independence and the price that had been paid on both fronts. Japan is heavily vilified in the narrative, an inevitable consequence given the nature of the story being told. At its core, The Vanished is the tale of a beleaguered nation and its people, and Bradley hands over the reins to the characters, who recount their stories from their personal — and hence, very subjective — points of view.

Anyone interested in Asian history will love Bradley’s offering. The writing evokes the rich setting, the tragedy of the events that transpired, and the depth of the characters’ experiences and feelings. There are several quotable portions, such as this incisive remark from Lady Sougyon: “There are two things in life that people want to hide but never succeed — ignorance and poverty.” These instructions given to Embon and his friends right before a crucial mission sent shivers down my spine: “Don’t get captured alive. If you think you might be, then shoot, shoot as many of them as you can. But save one last bullet for yourself.”

All of these give the book a very strong sense of character, time, and place. The motif of the quest for freedom is carried throughout, underscoring the sad truth that fetters come in many forms and sizes — an oppressive regime, a loveless marriage, an archaic cultural norm, poverty, riches, or even the status of royalty — leaving readers to wonder, “Is anyone ever really free?”

As engrossing as the historical elements were, the novel as a whole is not for those who lack patience or those who like definitive endings. The story takes its time rooting readers in history that the plot points found in the book description (e.g., Embon joining the revolutionary cause) actually take place toward the story’s third act. And after all that build-up, everything seems to happen and end in a snap. If this was Bradley’s intention, then readers are meant to leave the book at an all-time emotional high. For my part, however, I was surprised and bewildered at the abruptness of the conclusion.

Bradley’s prose sways the emotions and stimulates the mind, and her work is professionally edited. Unfortunately, the narrative suffers a little with the shifting POVs, as Bradley writes Lady Sougyon’s parts in first-person and the rest of the cast’s perspectives in third-person. There are dialogues that serve nothing but provide more background on a historical figure or event, something that would have been better off as straightforward exposition. One key character, the woman that Embon might love, entered the narrative without prior introduction and played a very minimal role in the story that her inclusion seemed more like an afterthought. She could have served as a catalyst to spur Embon’s character development, which came across as too sudden, a bit rushed, and consequently hard to believe.

That said, The Vanished is a worthwhile read, just shy of the perfect score because of the narrative issues mentioned. Fans of historical fiction surely won’t mind the many detours the story takes, but casual readers might be put off by the pace and the final destination. All things considered, The Vanished gets a final rating of 3 out of 4 stars.

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The Vanished
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Post by KristyKhem »

This seems like an insightful book. It reminds me of historical Korean drama TV series, most of which have abrupt, unpredictable endings and are deeply rooted in the history and politics of the era they are set in. I love Asian dramas and this one seems like a K-drama in a book form. It would be enjoyable for me. Thanks for the review! I'll check this one out.

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Post by inaramid »

KristyKhem wrote:
04 Jul 2019, 14:37
This seems like an insightful book. It reminds me of historical Korean drama TV series, most of which have abrupt, unpredictable endings and are deeply rooted in the history and politics of the era they are set in. I love Asian dramas and this one seems like a K-drama in a book form. It would be enjoyable for me. Thanks for the review! I'll check this one out.
That's the impression I got, actually ("a K-drama in a book form")! The author is Korean, although she now lives in the US. Yes, I think those who love Asian dramas would like this, too.

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Post by Amanda Deck »

If it's actual history, reading it in a story seems like an enjoyable way to learn about it. The shortcomings of it as a novel won't matter much with that as a goal I don't think. I'll check this out.

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Post by inaramid »

Amanda Deck wrote:
04 Jul 2019, 21:35
If it's actual history, reading it in a story seems like an enjoyable way to learn about it. The shortcomings of it as a novel won't matter much with that as a goal I don't think. I'll check this out.
Great point. It is actual history, so it's not bad getting a history lesson in this manner. :) Thanks for dropping by!

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Post by Michelle Fred »

This might be a little too intense for me.

A book with an abrupt ending usually leaves me scratching my head for answers.

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Post by inaramid »

Michelle Fred wrote:
05 Jul 2019, 01:16
This might be a little too intense for me.

A book with an abrupt ending usually leaves me scratching my head for answers.
Also true. A strong interest in history might be a prerequisite for this one.

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Post by kdstrack »

The history of this time in Korea would be interesting. I also enjoyed your description of Embon's character development, even though the ending might disappoint. You have made it seem intriguing! Good job!

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Post by Dee_218 »

This seems like an insightful read. I love history and would surely enjoy the read.

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Post by inaramid »

kdstrack wrote:
05 Jul 2019, 12:13
The history of this time in Korea would be interesting. I also enjoyed your description of Embon's character development, even though the ending might disappoint. You have made it seem intriguing! Good job!
It surely is! The cultural aspect also made the story all the more interesting.
Dee_218 wrote:
05 Jul 2019, 14:46
This seems like an insightful read. I love history and would surely enjoy the read.
Hope you get to enjoy this book!

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Post by unamilagra »

I admit that I know very little about Asian history, and I love historical fiction that opens my eyes and educates me. That said, I'm not sure I would enjoy the pacing of this particular novel. Thank you for a thorough and honest review.

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Post by inaramid »

unamilagra wrote:
11 Jul 2019, 09:02
I admit that I know very little about Asian history, and I love historical fiction that opens my eyes and educates me. That said, I'm not sure I would enjoy the pacing of this particular novel. Thank you for a thorough and honest review.
...but if you do feel like learning more about Asian history in the future, this is a great title to keep in mind. :)

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Post by Michael40 »

Historical fiction gives me that feeling of I am nothing without history. This one is about Asia. I want to broaden my horizon. Great review.

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Post by inaramid »

Michael40 wrote:
14 Apr 2020, 06:25
Historical fiction gives me that feeling of I am nothing without history. This one is about Asia. I want to broaden my horizon. Great review.
Nicely said. Thanks for dropping by!

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Post by Michael40 »

Historical fiction makes me curious. I really do want to broaden my horizon. I need some knowledge about Asia. Great review!

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