Official Review: Light in the Enchanted Forest

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inaramid
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Official Review: Light in the Enchanted Forest

Post by inaramid » 01 Nov 2018, 21:46

[Following is an official OnlineBookClub.org review of "Light in the Enchanted Forest" by Kristen Walton.]
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3 out of 4 stars
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At the start of Kristen Walton’s Light in the Enchanted Forest, the Butterfly Queen and King welcomes you to the Kingdom, informs you that the forest is ever-changing, and encourages you to let go of your old ways, trust in your higher self, and “get in the flow.” Love, trust, forgiveness, and gratitude are the key lessons underscored throughout this picture book’s gorgeously illustrated pages.

As a whole, the book feels very much like a classic fable, as the struggles of bees, ants, and spiders serve as launching points for reflections on choosing love over judgment, harmony over resistance to change, and self-confidence over fear. Passages are short and there’s a rhyming sequence after every other line that lends the narrative an easy, pleasant flow. Andrew Rodgers’ illustrations are a visual delight, complementing and strengthening the messages the book aims to deliver.

According to the book description, Light in the Enchanted Forest is meant for children and adults alike. While the prose appears simple, the ideas presented may be a bit too philosophical for younger readers. Phrases like “moving out of density and connecting with our light” as well as the idea of breathing in “life force energy” can be difficult for children (or even adults) to grasp. Words such as “perspective,” “positivity,” and “magnitude” may likewise be beyond the comprehension of beginning readers.

The allegorical elements also tend to favor the old versus the young. Characters are confronted with scenarios that would more likely occur in the workplace rather than the home or the playground. The messages imparted, while altogether inspiring and positive, also evoke some questions. For instance, where do we draw the line between “releasing judgment” and advocating passivity? How do we distinguish “resistance to change” and blind obedience to authority? As an inspirational book for adults, the simplicity of the storytelling restricts any deeper exploration of these themes. As a children’s picture book, the maturity of the themes may be a bit daunting and alienating for its target audience.

Light in the Enchanted Forest is undoubtedly sincere, although the attempt to reach to all readers across the board makes the narrative slightly problematic. On the plus side, the book is professionally edited. Because of its length, however, the presence of one error (the use of the adjective “everyday” instead of the adverb “every day”) is hard to overlook.

I rate Light in the Enchanted Forest 3 out of 4 stars. While Walton’s writing may be too abstruse for younger readers, Rodgers’ breathtaking depictions of the forest’s inhabitants — from the forgiving bee, the laboring ants, the sad spider, to the playful aphid — make this picture book an absolute joy to peruse. Mature readers looking to be inspired and renewed will love the book’s brevity. Younger readers, on the other hand, may need guidance and supervision in navigating through this exquisitely rendered (but somewhat baffling) enchanted forest.

******
Light in the Enchanted Forest
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Post by T_stone » 02 Nov 2018, 01:14

As this book looks good for young readers, it will appeal to some adults. I like the premise of the book. It's good book of motivation and guidance for adults and young readers. Although this book sounds very good, I don't think I like fables as they seem unreal to me. Thanks for the review.
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Post by fredrick otieno » 02 Nov 2018, 03:27

From the review, it's clear the author wanted the book to be meant for both adults and young ones, he tried to balance this in the execution though it wasn't that easy. All is not lost though i think the young and old would still enjoy this book alike. Thank you for this good review

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Post by ekwe1 » 02 Nov 2018, 05:38

I thank the writer of this book it also let me know . that we should forgive one and other

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Post by ekwe1 » 02 Nov 2018, 05:43

I know as this book is
good both for children I will buy it for my son

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Post by kandscreeley » 02 Nov 2018, 08:25

It definitely sounds a bit over the head of young readers. However, I know many adults that would enjoy a book such as this. Something child-like but that has philosophical leanings. I'll have to look into it more. Thanks.
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Post by SamSim » 03 Nov 2018, 08:17

For instance, where do we draw the line between “releasing judgment” and advocating passivity? How do we distinguish “resistance to change” and blind obedience to authority? As an inspirational book for adults, the simplicity of the storytelling restricts any deeper exploration of these themes. As a children’s picture book, the maturity of the themes may be a bit daunting and alienating for its target audience.
It sounds like the author would have been better off settling on one audience or the other. Maybe adding suggested questions for an adult to discuss with a child after reading the book would have been more intuitive. Great review!
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Post by gen_g » 03 Nov 2018, 10:54

It's a pity(?) that the author seems to be have straddled a fence regarding the choice of her target audience. However, the book still seems intriguing. Thanks for the stunning review!

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Post by kfwilson6 » 03 Nov 2018, 16:10

This is such an excellent, thorough analysis. I think if the author had a very clearly defined age group to target, and kept that age group in mind, this would be a superb book. Often life lessons for children, are great lessons for adults to keep in mind as well. We too easily get bogged down in "adulting" and forget to be caring people who look out for more than just ourselves.

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Post by inaramid » 03 Nov 2018, 22:05

T_stone wrote: ↑
02 Nov 2018, 01:14
As this book looks good for young readers, it will appeal to some adults.
Yes, I believe that was the author's intention. Thanks for dropping by.

fredrick otieno wrote: ↑
02 Nov 2018, 03:27
From the review, it's clear the author wanted the book to be meant for both adults and young ones, he tried to balance this in the execution though it wasn't that easy.
It did seem that way to me. The illustrations are gorgeous, though.

ekwe1 wrote: ↑
02 Nov 2018, 05:43
I know as this book is
good both for children I will buy it for my son
Thanks for dropping by. Hope your son loves the book! :)

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Post by inaramid » 03 Nov 2018, 22:35

kandscreeley wrote: ↑
02 Nov 2018, 08:25
It definitely sounds a bit over the head of young readers. However, I know many adults that would enjoy a book such as this. Something child-like but that has philosophical leanings. I'll have to look into it more. Thanks.
Definitely. I will continue to gush over the illustrations. Thanks for commenting!

SamSim wrote: ↑
03 Nov 2018, 08:17
It sounds like the author would have been better off settling on one audience or the other. Maybe adding suggested questions for an adult to discuss with a child after reading the book would have been more intuitive. Great review!
That's a great suggestion. My first thought after finishing the book was how to explain some terms and phrases to a child. Guide questions would definitely help. Thanks for dropping by!

gen_g wrote: ↑
03 Nov 2018, 10:54
It's a pity(?) that the author seems to be have straddled a fence regarding the choice of her target audience. However, the book still seems intriguing. Thanks for the stunning review!
Seems like it, right? Thanks for commenting!

kfwilson6 wrote: ↑
03 Nov 2018, 16:10
Often life lessons for children, are great lessons for adults to keep in mind as well. We too easily get bogged down in "adulting" and forget to be caring people who look out for more than just ourselves.
Thank you so much for your comment! This is an excellent thought as well.

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Post by Sahar Majid » 05 Nov 2018, 10:13

This book sounds like a delight to see and read! Although it seems like it's undecided on which age group it stands by.
Thank you for the wonderful review!

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Post by inaramid » 05 Nov 2018, 21:53

Sahar Majid wrote: ↑
05 Nov 2018, 10:13
This book sounds like a delight to see and read! Although it seems like it's undecided on which age group it stands by.
Thank you for the wonderful review!
This was exactly how I felt! Thank you for commenting.

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Post by Juliar252 » 06 Nov 2018, 18:01

This sounds like a light, but thought-provoking book perfect for mature readers. I am glad you mentioned that some of the topics might be too dense for young readers though because from the cover and description it does sound more like a children's book. Great review!

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Post by Franc93 » 09 Nov 2018, 14:19

There is always an inner child in all of us. So young or old, i am sure those with the right intellect will surely appreciate this book. I do have great concern on the target audience though because as per your review the style of delivery might be a little bit complex for under age readers. Great review non the less
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