Official Review: Bullies, Coasters, Hermits, and Heroes

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klbradley
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Official Review: Bullies, Coasters, Hermits, and Heroes

Post by klbradley »

[Following is an official OnlineBookClub.org review of "Bullies, Coasters, Hermits, and Heroes" by Suse Wilcox.]
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3 out of 4 stars
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Bullies, Coasters, Hermits, and Heros is a contemporary fiction novel written by Suse Wilcox. At roughly 70 Kindle edition pages, the story could easily be read in one sitting. Published in April of 2015, the tale revolves around two girls, Sarah and Jamie, and commences at the start of what they're anticipating will be an extraordinary summer saturated with adventure.

While the two girls are looking forward to spending time with friends, swimming, and enjoying the sunshine and fresh air, they also spend a plethora of their time discussing and quoting their heroes. Sarah and Jamie are beginning to reach the point of their young existence when they start to question the perplexities of life, including the neighborhood bully who torments everyone in his path, as well as the peculiar man who stays in the woods and is called a hermit by all the locals.

A perfect read for late elementary to middle school ages, Bullies, Coasters, Hermits, and Heroes offers lessons about growing up and learning to accept others as they are, as well as finding your own path in life. At the beginning of the novel, Sarah and Jamie were just going with the flow of their day-to-day occurrences, however, thanks to Mr. Jigio, the local hero who Jamie and Sarah continuously look to for advice and words of encouragement, the two girls find that helping others by offering their guidance towards faith can be more uplifting than anything else they could imagine. Due to the advancement shown in their maturity levels throughout the story, it's clear how much their personalities develop from beginning to end. It's transparent that the author is portraying a significant turning point in their lives when they begin to see more than just what meets the eye.

Throughout reading Bullies, Coasters, Hermits, and Heroes, I found a few minor grammatical and spelling errors, however, nothing that a simple run through with an editor couldn't easily and efficiently resolve. Some of these flaws included a missing word in sentence formatting, incorrect usage of know/no, and minor mistypes. Although most suitable for readers of an early middle-school education level, there was an instance of profanity that not all guardians would approve of their young children reading.

Despite the small errors I discovered while reading, I'm thoroughly pleased to rate Bullies, Coasters, Hermits, and Heroes 3 out of 4 stars. The story progressed at a steady pace, providing enough action to keep even the most easily bored young readers captivated. I would highly recommend the story to all young readers who are entering the age of self-awareness and discovery, as it's not often to find such an uplifting story as fitting for readers in this young age group.

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Bullies, Coasters, Hermits, and Heroes
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Michelle Fred
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Post by Michelle Fred »

This sounds like an educative book for young adults. The character development seems good too, I am certain that readers will appreciate their growth and mindset.

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klbradley
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Post by klbradley »

Michelle Fred wrote: ↑
26 Apr 2020, 16:19
This sounds like an educative book for young adults. The character development seems good too, I am certain that readers will appreciate their growth and mindset.
Thank you for checking it out! :)
Whenever you read a good book, somewhere in the world a door opens to allow in more light. :techie-studyingbrown:
–Vera Nazarian

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