What do you make of "Faction Before Blood"?

Discuss the June 2014 book of the month Divergent by Veronica Roth. While only Divergent--the first book of the series--is the book of the month, feel free to use this subforum to discuss the rest of the series or to talk about the movies, but make sure not to post spoilers unless noted in the topic title.
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Gustavsson
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Re: What do you make of "Faction Before Blood"?

Post by Gustavsson » 27 Jan 2015, 19:26

Faction before blood seems to me much like the phrase "the blood of the covenant is thicker than the water of the womb." In short, the people you have bonded with and the family you choose are more important than the family you are born into. I agree with this for the most part but in Divergent I think they're a bit too harsh about it. If they allowed the factions to mingle more, and for people to stay in contact with their families, I think more people would choose to change factions when they came of age.

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Post by Jesska6029 » 08 Mar 2015, 13:37

I think "Faction Before Blood" makes it so there are weak family bonds. If people know that they will choose to go to a different faction at the choosing ceremony, then they will probably not have strong family bonds. It is important for the government in Divergent to keep people from forming exceptionally loving bonds because then they could choose to revolt with their families.
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Post by csimmons032 » 08 Mar 2015, 14:21

Faction before blood comes into play many times throughout the series. Some characters believe, including Tris's own brother, that family should come last to your faction. In my opinion, this concept is completely wrong. Nothing on this earth should come before family. Family should be the people who support you. Which is why you shouldn't just treat them like they don't matter.

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Post by Scorsee » 19 Mar 2015, 21:37

I that people really like to form tribes and that those can be centered on a number common characteristics. Each subject of a culture bands together in ways similar to the factions-but their is always an option to shift an opinion or interest in something. Cultural, Economic and Religious similarities seem to be the most like the faction system.
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Post by EleIIIV » 19 Mar 2015, 21:47

emilywagner wrote:Personally, my family comes before everything else I absolutely could not imagine having to abandon them forever. I really appreciated Tris's dedication to her family as well, despite the societal rules. It seemed representative of the lengths most of the people I know would go to protect and be with their families.

I must say though the idea of faction before blood is not all that foreign either. Once many people are kicked out of the nest you will see them select new ways of life and new people who may treat them better than their biological family. In a way their new faction becomes their new "blood" so it is an odd concept to think about.
I think you're right about that

-- 19 Mar 2015, 21:53 --

Great Question
Faction before blood means to me in opinion means putting society first before your family, friends and personal life
it's a interesting concept because it's almost the same as serving a royal family needs instead of thinking about your own
Thank you for asking this question

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Post by Jaynjey1 » 21 Mar 2015, 11:39

Paliden wrote:I agree. God first, family second. But then how do we define family? I think that is the question of "Faction before Blood". They are saying that if you belong in that faction, then you can't relate to your family members like you can to the other faction members. I know that when you go through trials and difficult circumstances (i.e. training), you form a bond with those people that in a way makes them family. I think the military is a good example of this in our day and age. You are trained that your brothers-in-arms are everything. It is ingrained into your core. And that isn't necessarily a bad thing. So I understand both sides of it, I guess.
In my personal life, I believe God first and family second, too. I've taught my kids that God would always be there for them. Then I teach them to put family above others. When others turn against you, your family will still be there. Who picks you up when your hanging on by s tring? Who bails you out when you're in trouble? Who fights your injustices along side you?

However, in Divergent, they seem to expect the faction to replace these qualities of family but only to an extent. While training for your faction, you can still fail and get thrown to the factionless. With such high stakes, the competition during training was cutthroat. You could not certainly trust anyone.

From another perspective, consider how hurt Tris's father felt when both his children chose other factions. He seemed to feel betrayed. He expected his children to continue in his faction, as his family. He didn't continue to harbor ill will, though. Later, Dauntless under control of the serum attacked Tris's family and former faction. She sought them out to make sure they would be protected.

I think their society states faction before blood, but it doesn't seem to be a belief held in the highest regard. I think the military comparison is probably the thought behind this belief, but our military follows it much better.

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Post by gatorgirl_823 » 31 Mar 2015, 11:20

In the book series, the society is set up and run with the idea that your faction is more important than anything, including family. Individuals are supposed to be loyal to their group instead of friends and family. This idea would be really hard to get behind if you have a loving and supportive family. Persons who don't get along with family could stand by this society easier though.

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Post by steinhm » 02 Apr 2015, 04:30

I can't say I agreed with this. "Faction before blood." I thought it was a scary concept and something I really couldn't even remotely identify with. To me family should always come first so saying anything else should come first doesn't make sense to me. Obviously the whole concept behind the series is a dystopian society, but I had a bigger problem with the concept of faction before blood more than I did about being divided between factions.

I was totally shocked when reading the book to discover once you joined a faction you were separated from your blood family. I really struggled to wrap my head around the fact to be honest.

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Post by MissJane » 12 Apr 2015, 23:55

Family is super important; it is cruel and wrong to make a person choose between faction and family! Faction does become sort of the "adopted family" but that doesn't mean they should have to choose.

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Post by abasto123 » 19 Apr 2015, 18:46

Family should come before all else but in their world it makes sense to stay true to their faction. I believe they should have been more lenient on family and allowed families to stay connected as long as they also stayed true to their faction. When you choose a faction they become your new family. You are with them all the time and also following in what they do therefore faction is important. Though family will always be more important.

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Post by measwell » 24 Apr 2015, 12:00

In our modern dystopia, faction is often the same as blood. We cannot help it. We believe what our parents believe because we have the same lens in viewing the world. Adolescence can cause some upheaval in behavior - in how our actions are influenced by hormones apart from our beliefs - but that is a passing aberration in our lives. I would never want to have my faction chosen so young. Teenagers are idealistic. They are impulsive. They do not understand the realities and disappointments that adults face daily. It is difficult to imagine a choice you make at 16 affecting the rest of your life so hugely. So, blood before faction - if it is an issue. And that is exactly how it played out in the book.

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Post by Rachaelamb1 » 28 Apr 2015, 03:16

CrescentMoon wrote:I really don't like this idea of faction before blood. In my opinion, it's something that a tyrannical government would want its citizens to believe in, to give up their family and become loyal to them. Family ties usually are supposed to be very strong, and I don't know many people who wouldn't do anything for their family. That is a threat to the government so I feel like the message of faction before blood is a way to brainwash people into believing that their loyalty needs to be to the factions and society at all times, that way they are easier to manipulate and control.
I couldn't agree more! You stated that perfectly.

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Post by Heather » 21 May 2015, 14:18

This is another book that I never would have read if it hadn't been the book of the month, but I'm so glad I did. I have since read all of the books in the series and have seen the two movies that have come out. I even own the first one. I love this story.

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Post by tracy19 » 26 May 2015, 13:19

I think blood is thicker than water so family should come first, it should be more important than a faction.

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Post by Kjewett07 » 30 May 2015, 16:00

I had a hard time with that. To me, family is the most important thing in the world. Family are the people you can rely on when you can't rely on anyone else. I really felt bad for Tris when she couldn't turn to her own blood family when things got tough in Dauntless. I know how badly I would have wanted my own parents or siblings if I was in her situation. Just having them tell me that they supported me and were there if I just needed someone to talk to.

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