Alternating between point of views

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Morgan Jones
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Re: Alternating between point of views

Post by Morgan Jones » 30 Jun 2018, 02:02

If I am writing in first person I would prefer sticking to one POV otherwise it just gets confusing to know who is who and the flow of he story is interrupted. Third person is the best option if you want to write many POVs because it doesn't disrupt the flow and also allows you flexibility to talk through many POVs.
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Post by MedleyLORE » 30 Jun 2018, 13:18

Switching between pov’s every chapter has help many authors in the past. Although I could never really get he hang or switching the personality as quickly and not have the two meld together but to each their own, you know?
I usually stick to third person if I was not be controlling more than one characters thought process. Ive given broken adaptive characters the best POV but got lost once it got to explaining the scene. I’m just a little messy with my explications. As you can see^

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Post by Moray_001 » 20 Aug 2018, 13:08

Switching perspectives can be tricky if you don’t do it right. I’m a writer and some of my readers gave me feedback on it. Some preferred not to even have the perspectives indicated at the start and let them figure it out on their own.

Others like it stated because they want to see what’s going on with the other characters.

But personally, I don’t like perspectives that just repeat the same event that happened previously. Not unless there’s something important included there.

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Post by H0LD0Nthere » 21 Aug 2018, 20:20

All good comments here.

Susan Howatch's Church of England series features about five or six novels. Each is written in first-person POV. However, each book in the series is narrated by a different character. So, first you have a book "written" by Charles Ashworth. Then you have one "written" by Ashworth's arch-rival. Then you have one "written" by Ashworth's spiritual director. And so on. It's fascinating to see different characters describe the same people, sometimes even the same situations, and see them completely differently. However, of course they don't just rehash all the exact same events. Each novel gives a generous glimpse into the narrator's backstory, as well as developing the ongoing story that is happening in all of their lives.

In some of her earlier novels (not the CofE series), she has different subsections of the book narrated in the first person by different characters, introduced with the name of the character narrating. Usually just when you start to get interested in or curious about a "minor" character, it turns out they narrate the next subsection.

So, yeah, I'm a big fan of first person.

Agatha Christie has also done some awesome stuff with first person, usually as unreliable narrator. Check out "Endless Night."
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Post by jjmainor » 21 Aug 2018, 21:30

There are no set-in-stone rules when it comes to a writing style, but if you're going to do something unconventional like shifting between 1st and 3rd person narration, you have to be very careful. I did it once in a science fiction story where I opened most of the chapters with the captain's log in 1st person before switching to 3rd person outside the log. The log was differentiated with italics so the reader knew when they were reading the log and when they were reading the objective story.

The reason for the variation was because the captain suffered from a degenerative disease. I wanted 1st person to give the reader the glimpse inside in head as his condition worsened, but by the end of the story, his mind was too gone to effectively write the ending in 1st person. The idea of the 1st person "log" was the compromise.

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Post by H0LD0Nthere » 22 Aug 2018, 12:42

jjmainor wrote:
21 Aug 2018, 21:30
There are no set-in-stone rules when it comes to a writing style, but if you're going to do something unconventional like shifting between 1st and 3rd person narration, you have to be very careful. I did it once in a science fiction story where I opened most of the chapters with the captain's log in 1st person before switching to 3rd person outside the log. The log was differentiated with italics so the reader knew when they were reading the log and when they were reading the objective story.

The reason for the variation was because the captain suffered from a degenerative disease. I wanted 1st person to give the reader the glimpse inside in head as his condition worsened, but by the end of the story, his mind was too gone to effectively write the ending in 1st person. The idea of the 1st person "log" was the compromise.
Sounds interesting and poignant.
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