Too many ideas

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Taytae
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Too many ideas

Post by Taytae » 15 May 2018, 17:00

I have been writing the same books for years. I keep getting different ideas for each book which drags me from the one that I am on working. I keep coming back to the first book that I started and not being a fan of it which leads me starting to rewrite. I have been writing for years now. It has become a cycle between 10 books that jump between. All of this books are part of the same universe. Should just scrap this universe and move on or should I keep going with this cycle and maybe one day finish one of these?

PS: I am sorry for any typos. My keyboard board does not always listen to me.

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Sachitsharma
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Post by Sachitsharma » 16 May 2018, 04:39

Try to focus on one book. When you are writing 1 book don't thik about anything else

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Lolo Skyooz
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Post by Lolo Skyooz » 16 May 2018, 12:48

Jeez, that is a problem. 10 years, huh? Have you been able to finish any books in that time? I only ask because ...10 years...think of all the worlds and lives you could have explored in that time if you weren't always censoring yourself, or telling yourself that your work isn't good enough. You might need to just write something you hate or think is utter trash, just to get something out that you can look back on later and have a stronger sense of direction with so you can eventually finish it. If nothing else, writing something you think sucks outright could be just what you need to break into the habit of finishing a work. And doing it deliberately might feel better than believing you have written garbage by accident. I'm pretty tired of that feeling myself. :wink2:

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Taytae
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Post by Taytae » 18 May 2018, 20:16

Lolo Skyooz wrote:
16 May 2018, 12:48
Jeez, that is a problem. 10 years, huh? Have you been able to finish any books in that time? I only ask because ...10 years...think of all the worlds and lives you could have explored in that time if you weren't always censoring yourself, or telling yourself that your work isn't good enough. You might need to just write something you hate or think is utter trash, just to get something out that you can look back on later and have a stronger sense of direction with so you can eventually finish it. If nothing else, writing something you think sucks outright could be just what you need to break into the habit of finishing a work. And doing it deliberately might feel better than believing you have written garbage by accident. I'm pretty tired of that feeling myself. :wink2:
The biggest problem is that I want what is on paper to reflect how I imagine these characters in my head. I can't seem to find the words to describe them. I can write a short scene but parts that turn a scene into a story is the problem. I have hundreds of short scenes but I just can't put them together right. This summer, I am determined to finish the 1st book.

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Lolo Skyooz
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Post by Lolo Skyooz » 19 May 2018, 01:34

That is a problem for, I think, every kind of artist. Materializing something that only exists in your mind is tough, no matter what. I am convinced that for most people, what you get onto the page is never going to exactly capture what you imagined. However, I think that's a good way to measure your progress in gaining skill--by judging what you have learned in terms of performing this manifestation faithfully, getting as close to your goal as you can. I'm serious though, write some pure garbage, on purpose. It might release some pressure that could be blocking you up.

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Post by courtneymcreative » 26 May 2018, 13:49

DON'T SCRAP IT. Please.

Here's my advice:
-When you write, just write. Sounds obvious, right? But it's not. I have and probably always will struggle with sitting down to write and wanting it to be everything I thought it would be. There ends up being too much censorship and criticism. I skip around, I can't focus, and I give up. I started getting up and writing before my brain was fully awake and couldn't tell me that what I was writing was bad, or that I had more ideas. I forced myself never to go backwards, but to just write from beginning to end. Don't go back to edit until you're done a draft.
This will help you to complete an entire manuscript, and much quicker. From there comes the long process of editing and perfecting.
-Organize. When you have new ideas, jot them down. Maybe you have a folder for characters, a folder for descriptions you like, a folder for settings. Maybe these things will find their way into your rough draft and maybe they'll come in later. It's important not to stress over these things, or force the writing in a certain direction. Start creating outlines if that will help you to get your ideas in order.
-Get feedback. Having others critique your work will help you so much. It'll make it more clear what parts are important and which aren't, or what's confusing and what could be expanded on. Giving feedback to yourself is also important but can be tricky. Make sure you have plenty of time away from the manuscript between writing and editing so you can look at it with a fresh perspective and a clear mind. Sometimes changing the font or printing it can help you get a new perspective as well and see things you would miss or skip over on a screen.

I hope this helps and I wish you luck!!

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Post by Sushan » 28 May 2018, 12:49

Just work on all as you wish. But the problem with re reading after some time is you feel like the written style or the content is not good enough and you try to change it fully. So it is good to write in a single breath as fast as possible and publish it, without looking back. Later you can criticize or edit or whatever you may like can do to it
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Post by GKerr » 30 May 2018, 08:50

My advice is to avoid re-writing till you have a solid amount down. Editing your work is a vital part of the process, or so my degree tutors keep telling me, but until you have the majority of an initial draft down editing will only slow your progress.
If you are stuck for ideas about plot or characters try creating a mind map. This can help you visualise the best direction for your work to go in as you can physically see the paths that can and can't work.
Hope this helps !

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Post by cpivie » 31 May 2018, 13:11

I'm trying to get over the brainstorming and perfectionism hurdle and just write. It's really hard, because the story in our heads will always be better, and it will always be changing. There comes a point when you have to decide if you're writing for pleasure and an outlet with no thought of publishing or finishing, or if you intend your story to become a book someday. If you have publishing dreams, then get the whole story out and let it be what it is - editors and such will let you know what is not cohesive, what needs changed, what needs practice or development, etc. You will never be satisfied with it yourself, so getting it down and letting others provide feedback will give you external perspectives to ground yourself.

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Post by Morgan Jones » 06 Jun 2018, 06:37

A book can take up to 5 years to complete, that is perfectly normal. I have been writing a book for 5 years now because I kept erasing and rewriting over and over again to satisfy the complex plot in my mind. A good solution is constantly taking a break, writing different books to get your inspiration going, so you're on the right track! I suggest making a goal for yourself to check out your first book at least once a day. Just reread the last paragraph you wrote, but you don't have to write anything until it comes to you. If you don't feel inspired to write anything, read books that have a similar storyline to your first book. That definitely helps, or start a new document and write a paragraph about some random idea that struck your mind lately to make the inspieation return, then go back to your first book as soon as you finish and try writing a paragraph while your mind is still inspired.

Hope this helps.
"Reading is a conversation. All books talk. But a good book listens as well." - Mark Haddon

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