The Book Cover Design

Use this forum to discuss the November 2021 Book of the month, "The Freedom Building" by Martin Kendall
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Brett Linette
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Re: The Book Cover Design

Post by Brett Linette »

Katarina Radovcic wrote: 19 Nov 2021, 07:56
Brett Linette wrote: 19 Nov 2021, 06:20
Katarina Radovcic wrote: 19 Nov 2021, 05:25 What grabbed my attention the most is that, obviously we have a silhouette of our protagonist with his emotions that we read about in the book, as well as the headache, but the title of the book is really interesting. The design of the title is supposed to represent the building. We have its name - "The Freedom Building", but just like in the book where we don't have a clear image of building, we don't see any shape of the title other than it's very dominant and it stands out.There is no shape, no nothing to indicate what the building looks like. There is no picture of the building to reffer to. Just like John, we see and know of the building, it obviously exists, but all we really have is a name.
The dominant and unrevealing title stands for the mystery of the building, the unclear vision of it. The more I look at the cover, the more this idea fascinates me.
I noticed that the angle of the font resembled that of a building when you look up at it from the ground, but it never occurred to me that the name of the building is in place of its face because he can't put a face to it? I will never look at the cover the same way again; it's always going to give me chills from here on out.

Thank you for the revelation.
Yes, the angle isn't coincidental either. It presents the building looming over the city, but even more so the mystery and the darkness looming over the protagonist. And yes, exactly like you said, John as well as the reader can't put a face to it, we only get the idea of its presence.
I don't think I was ever this intrigued by a cover!
You're right that the building isn't just hanging over the protagonist but looming over him.

I've never read so much into a cover, either!
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Abi McCoy wrote: 19 Nov 2021, 08:07 I think the way the block white text is arranged to portray The Freedom Building was really well done, as is the fact that John is only shown in silhouette. Not to mention that his pose indicates deep contemplation or a painful headache. I loved this cover!
It took me a while to understand just what significance the shape and the angle of the white text held, but having come to understand it, it's become my favorite aspect of the cover.
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Post by Brett Linette »

katerina_12 wrote: 19 Nov 2021, 10:13
Brett Linette wrote: 19 Nov 2021, 04:11
katerina_12 wrote: 18 Nov 2021, 11:41 The cover of the book is mostly in black and red. Red is bold and conveys feelings of passion, and aggression. Black is serious and signifies mystery and death. You will find both colors in horror and thrillers. The colors create a tense mood from the beginning. The black shadow on a red background. This creates the appropriate mood for the reader to read the novel. I think the cover of the book is perfectly selected.
Thank you for bringing the color scheme to my attention! I know different colors are said to evoke different emotions, but I can never remember what color evokes what emotion. I think the color white is thought to represent purity or something of that nature. Why do you think the font is written in white?
Yes, you are right, white is the color of purity, of hope. I think the color "white" is in every person, as well as in the protagonist. Although the protagonist has many flaws, we must not forget that he is also a human being and has a good side. The character is really a mix of red, black, and white. Thanks for this thought-provoking question, I wonder what you think about this matter?
It's funny you say white is the color of hope; having not made anything of his career as an architect, he seemed to have thought the building was his only hope, which would explain why it's colored white.
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Post by Brett Linette »

review-specialist wrote: 19 Nov 2021, 16:21 I think the design was just right, a silhouette that leaves room for imagination while at the same time the gesture/stance of the silhouette evoked the emotions of the protagonist within the read.
[/quote

I thought the silhouette was supposed to leave room for imagination, but the more I think about it, the more I wonder if our inability to recognize the protagonist is supposed to reflect his inability to recognize himself.
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aaurba wrote: 20 Nov 2021, 03:37 I'm sorry if I can't put it more concretely or elaborately, but the book has an effect on me that it is an exciting novel. The cover art looks decent and created by a professional, so that's nice. It's also appropriate for the themes that the book contains: The main color is red, and one of the many things that the red hue represents is blood, which points to violence. Violence is one of the main themes of the book (terrorism both in the start and end of the book).
It is nice that the cover looks professional! If the cover of a book doesn't look professional, I start to question how professionally edited the book is as a whole.

The red is what makes the cover pop. I can't imagine the backdrop being any other color.
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emeraldlaurice012 wrote: 21 Nov 2021, 07:01 The silhouette is really fitting to the theme of the story. It portrays a dark space, which is very fitting, as the protagonist in the story was left in the dark.
I think it's interesting that we don't get to see who the protagonist is. Could it be that we don't get to know who he is because he himself doesn't know?
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Post by Brett Linette »

review-specialist wrote: 19 Nov 2021, 16:21 I think the design was just right, a silhouette that leaves room for imagination while at the same time the gesture/stance of the silhouette evoked the emotions of the protagonist within the read.
I thought the silhouette was supposed to leave room for imagination, but the more I think about it, the more I wonder if our inability to recognize the protagonist is supposed to reflect his inability to recognize himself.
[/quote]
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Post by Vandana Garg »

The book cover is great not only because of the silhouette but the designing of the title itself. I like how it is inclined upwards while the protagonist is shadowed in a perspiring mode.
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Sometimes I pick out books from what I see on the cover. This artwork on the cover speaks volumes about what you might find inside this book. Although we can’t see a clear face, this black silhouette with his hand to his head, may mean there is something wrong. It could be frustration, stress, confusion and/or sadness. The little blurb below the picture mentions the word”darkness” , which confirms my beliefs.
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My favorite thing about the cover design is the pose of the protagonist. It connects perfectly with the story, that he is going through his amnesia and he really confused about what is going on around him.
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Post by Wangu Wyle L »

If it will help your case guys, As for me having not read the book, I thought it was about Army veterans dealing with PTSD. I deduced that from the gesture of the silhouette man, the big bold lettering and unussual dark colors.
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Post by Ethan Howe »

I think the cover brings out the psychological part of the novel because of the dark silhouette who appears to be brain storming. I don't like it that it is red because I hate that color. I like it because it tries to paint a picture to the reader about what to expect in the novel.
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Post by EternalD »

The book cover is fitting, but I didn't particularly like it. The man on the cover seems to be thinking about a philosophical question. He doesn't look like someone with memory problems. I would choose an image similar to this one to exemplify the protagonist's situation:

Image
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Post by Limpho Mojakisane »

katerina_12 wrote: 18 Nov 2021, 11:41 The cover of the book is mostly in black and red. Red is bold and conveys feelings of passion, and aggression. Black is serious and signifies mystery and death. You will find both colors in horror and thrillers. The colors create a tense mood from the beginning. The black shadow on a red background. This creates the appropriate mood for the reader to read the novel. I think the cover of the book is perfectly selected.
Black signifying mystery also adds to the silhouette part don't you think? Because the silhouette also poses some sort of mystery which also speaks volumes! Moreover, I believe the reader can already guess that there is some sort of mystery and suspense in the book just by the design of the cover.
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Post by Limpho Mojakisane »

Jodeci 007 wrote: 21 Nov 2021, 02:54 After reading the book, I got to understand certain aspects of the book cover, but before then, I didn't think much of it, and it's not very easy to capture the full essence of a book by just the book cover at times.
This is quite true. I also hadn't thought much of the cover before reading the book and, I certainly could not understand how the silhouette on the cover and the title 'The Freedom Building' synchronize. But, obviously after reading the book, its safe to say now I can understand what the book cover portrays.
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