Rion's problem in social mingling, was it because of him or his mother?

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Sushan
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Rion's problem in social mingling, was it because of him or his mother?

Post by Sushan »

Rion did not have any long-term friends. And it seems like he is not even trying to have any. Seemingly he is an introvert who is shy to talk with strangers, and also content with his loneliness. His unusual ability led him to think of him as an alien, and it too supported his nature to remain further.
I ignore them before heading to my favorite classroom position. Nothing says don’t talk to me like the back corner window seat.
(Location 91 - Kindle version)

[/quote]I give an apathetic nod, coupled with my best faulty smile, before turning back toward the window. I avoid making eye contact with any other student. The chirping birds have my attention for the next few minutes,[/quote] (Location 113 - Kindle version)

But we see how he could not remain in one place (or one school) because of his mother's job. It is common for a student to feel awkward when going to a new school, and it is fair for a usual student to require some time to make new friends.
New schools. New surroundings. I’ve done them so many times they’ve become as much of a routine as tying my shoes.
(Location 66 - Kindle version)
This is my sixth school in four years
(Location 84 - Kindle version)

Ultimately these reasons made Rion a lonely fellow. Even the connection between him and his mother was not too strong. Which component contributed his loneliness the most? Was it his nature? Was it his mother's frequent change of locations? Or was it because his mother was never really open with him?
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Post by asteel18 »

I believe it was the moving so much. Every time you leave your home and friends, it's a loss. He never knew how long he was going to be in a particular school, so why bother making friends? When he did finally open up to Dee, he still found ways to push her away. Although Dee, being in a military family, was still was able to easily make new friends. I can't imagine what that would be like, to move every few months or so.
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Sushan
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Post by Sushan »

asteel18 wrote: 01 Sep 2021, 13:10 I believe it was the moving so much. Every time you leave your home and friends, it's a loss. He never knew how long he was going to be in a particular school, so why bother making friends? When he did finally open up to Dee, he still found ways to push her away. Although Dee, being in a military family, was still was able to easily make new friends. I can't imagine what that would be like, to move every few months or so.
Did he actually want not to have friends? We see how he was yearning to see Dee throughout a weekend. He regretted refusing to go out with her on a Friday night. Seemingly in many occasions he was either discriminated or neglected due to various reasons. But he loved to have company, and Dee fulfilled that, and he gladly accepted that though he still showed some signs of rejecting her.
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Post by greghefley »

His mother would be a main reason for his introverted nature. There were many other kind of people like him, who seems not to be as closed up as Rion. It's mainly because of his mother trying to protect him.
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Post by asteel18 »

Sushan wrote: 02 Sep 2021, 00:51
asteel18 wrote: 01 Sep 2021, 13:10 I believe it was the moving so much. Every time you leave your home and friends, it's a loss. He never knew how long he was going to be in a particular school, so why bother making friends? When he did finally open up to Dee, he still found ways to push her away. Although Dee, being in a military family, was still was able to easily make new friends. I can't imagine what that would be like, to move every few months or so.
Did he actually want not to have friends? We see how he was yearning to see Dee throughout a weekend. He regretted refusing to go out with her on a Friday night. Seemingly in many occasions he was either discriminated or neglected due to various reasons. But he loved to have company, and Dee fulfilled that, and he gladly accepted that though he still showed some signs of rejecting her.
I don't think it's a matter of not wanting friends, it's not wanting the hurt of losing them. Rion absolutely wanted friendship and a sense of belonging, but also knew that somewhere during the school year, he'd have to say goodbye.
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Post by Medhansh Bhardwaj »

I won't completely blame his mother. Yes, her job played it's role in introverting Rion, but he always had the freedom to overcome the situation and make new friends. Rion should have stepped out of his comfort zone and tried social interaction. Having friends for only a few months is much better than having no friends at all.
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Post by Sushan »

greghefley wrote: 02 Sep 2021, 06:31 His mother would be a main reason for his introverted nature. There were many other kind of people like him, who seems not to be as closed up as Rion. It's mainly because of his mother trying to protect him.
Sometimes mothers can be overprotective. But here she had her own reasons and she wanted the best for her son. What she could have done was being open with him and explain him what he is and how he need to be protected. Then both of their lives would have been more easy, and also Rion could have led a far more normal life.
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Post by Sushan »

asteel18 wrote: 02 Sep 2021, 07:51
Sushan wrote: 02 Sep 2021, 00:51
asteel18 wrote: 01 Sep 2021, 13:10 I believe it was the moving so much. Every time you leave your home and friends, it's a loss. He never knew how long he was going to be in a particular school, so why bother making friends? When he did finally open up to Dee, he still found ways to push her away. Although Dee, being in a military family, was still was able to easily make new friends. I can't imagine what that would be like, to move every few months or so.
Did he actually want not to have friends? We see how he was yearning to see Dee throughout a weekend. He regretted refusing to go out with her on a Friday night. Seemingly in many occasions he was either discriminated or neglected due to various reasons. But he loved to have company, and Dee fulfilled that, and he gladly accepted that though he still showed some signs of rejecting her.
I don't think it's a matter of not wanting friends, it's not wanting the hurt of losing them. Rion absolutely wanted friendship and a sense of belonging, but also knew that somewhere during the school year, he'd have to say goodbye.
The book is written in the present time. Do we actually loose friends in today's world because we simply lost touch with them physically? Rion could have had many ways to keep in touch with his friends though he frequently changed his residence as well as school. I think he was feared to approach anyone because of the fear of being ridiculed or neglected, and seemingly he has been having such experiences quite often.
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Post by Sushan »

Medhansh Bhardwaj wrote: 02 Sep 2021, 08:52 I won't completely blame his mother. Yes, her job played it's role in introverting Rion, but he always had the freedom to overcome the situation and make new friends. Rion should have stepped out of his comfort zone and tried social interaction. Having friends for only a few months is much better than having no friends at all.
Having something is better than nothing. But Rion never tried to get out of his comfort zone. Even in the friendship with Dee, it was Dee who started talking to him. But it is not because simply of his introverted nature, but also because of the discrimination by other kids. We see how others simply tried to bully and ridicule him just because he was the new Black kid in the school as well as the area.
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Post by Omega_01 »

Changing of schools and the environment as a whole may be a factor responsible for Rion being a lonely fellow but a support system like his mum or teacher at school would have assisted him to gain some courage and the attitude he needed to overcome the challenge.
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Post by Peace Chux »

Character or behavior is usually as a result of a composite of different factors. That said, I believe all of them, not one contributed to his loneliness. The frequent moving didn't allow much time for making friends, and his mother's relationship with him didn't provide that outlet for the emotions he must have gone through each time they moved. So, instead of always making friends whom he was bound to lose, it was easier to be alone. Over time, it would become a habit, and eventually his nature.
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Post by Suekihleng »

All three could certainly play a factor but I think primarily the moving around frequently. That's tough on any kid but when combined with a naturally shy kid, particularly one holding a deep secret such as Rion, then you're definitely looking at someone who will be more withdrawn from social situations.
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Post by Courtney Hughes »

I think it all compounded into a perfect storm but ultimately I believe it is his mother’s silence and what feels like indifference at first. Rion’s inability to make friends became a choice to protect himself. He knew he would end up changing schools at some point so when he was young I think that he developed this as a coping mechanism.
His mother not being open with him ever was the inciting incident, in my opinion. Next would have been them moving from place to place.
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Post by Ethan Howe »

I think that having special powers caused him the problems and made him fear that other people will see him as a stranger. His mothers failure to motivate and talk to him about his powers also caused this.
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Post by Sushan »

Omega_01 wrote: 02 Sep 2021, 15:18 Changing of schools and the environment as a whole may be a factor responsible for Rion being a lonely fellow but a support system like his mum or teacher at school would have assisted him to gain some courage and the attitude he needed to overcome the challenge.
I don't think a teenager need any assistance from his family or teachers to make new friends. One can be a less forward fellow, but a few days time is enough to make new friends. Seemingly Rion has chosen to isolate himself by even sitting at the back corner, looking out the window, clearly refusing any contact. So others may have left him be alone, and it has made him forever alone.
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