Official Review: Emergence of Modern Brain and the Build-...

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KristyKhem
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Official Review: Emergence of Modern Brain and the Build-...

Post by KristyKhem » 19 Feb 2019, 16:33

[Following is an official OnlineBookClub.org review of "Emergence of Modern Brain and the Build-Up of Imaginary Civilization" by Dan M. Mrejeru.]
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2 out of 4 stars
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Emergence of Modern Brain and the Imaginary Build-Up of Civilization by Dan M. Mrejeru is a scientific research paper which focuses on the trends in modern brain evolution. Mrejeru discusses many interconnected concepts such as brain entropy, the development of languages in Western and Eastern cultures, and the way in which emotions affect the human imagination. Ultimately, he discusses how these are a precursor to the creation of inventions, literature, art, and music. He also examines natural selection and its role in the evolution of different brain modalities and conscious states.

While pursuing my university degree, I took an interesting course called Humans and the Environment which focused on natural selection and the brain evolution of early humans. I really enjoyed learning about this, so I chose to read this book since I thought it would include some intriguing points. I was not disappointed. Mrejeru’s theories were grounded in real examples and made me see human evolution from a new perspective. For instance, the idea that our unconscious mind may be shaping our experiences based on our goals and emotions made me realize that this directly ties in with the popular ‘Law of Attraction’ concept which took the world by storm when the book, The Secret, was released. Mrejeru stated that the brain could be filtering out unimportant data while streamlining our experiences according to our wants and desires. This could be brain evolution at work, but due to natural selection, some people are pre-disposed to this new mode while others are not. I really appreciated that this book helped me to link my past studies of brain development with new, relevant concepts of brain evolution.

His points on language development were also fascinating to me because I had never come across them before. I really enjoy books which can teach me something new. One of the most exciting things I learned from this book was that language was not only formed as a method of communication, but it acted as a programming tool to help humans exert control over their reality. Furthermore, Western languages were created around nouns or objects which helped Westerners to conceptualize and imagine new ideas, but Eastern languages were formed based on verbs or actions so they placed more importance on activity.

Unfortunately, the astounding scientific content was the only positive thing about this book. As a matter of fact, it seemed more like a research paper than an actual book. It was mainly typed in a very small font, the line spacing was minimal, and there were no line spaces between the paragraphs. This made reading it very challenging as everything seemed jumbled. Some lines were underlined or typed in bold. This made it seem like it was a rough draft instead of a published piece of literature. Moreover, errors leaped from page to page in this book so often that I nearly couldn’t keep up. This is what I liked least about the book. Since it contained so many errors and formatting issues, I think it would greatly benefit from professional editing.

Emergence of Modern Brain and the Imaginary Build-Up of Civilization contained enthralling new concepts and ideas, but I was disappointed with its poor layout and the errors it contained. Therefore, I’m rating it 2 out of 4 stars. Once it has been fully edited, I think it will appeal to adults who enjoy reading about new scientific theories, the development of language, and evolution. Students who are pursuing tertiary studies in the aforementioned fields may also find this book really helpful. However, the book contained many technical terms, hence, it may be quite complex for those without a science background to understand.

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Emergence of Modern Brain and the Build-Up of Imaginary Civilization
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Post by mihaela_bartha » 22 Feb 2019, 02:22

The book sounds really appealing. I am very interested in the subject of human evolution and in reading evidence-based literature in general so I think I would enjoy it, however given your observations regarding editing, I think I would prefer waiting for a professionally edited edition. Thank you for the review!

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Post by kandscreeley » 22 Feb 2019, 09:25

You lost me at scientific research paper. Then, honestly, I stopped reading at small font and no spaces between paragraphs. This one is not for me. Thanks, though. Sorry you had to suffer through this one.
“There is no friend as loyal as a book.”
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Post by PGreen » 22 Feb 2019, 13:09

While I have recently discovered my interest in the evolution of the brain as well as language development, there are many other books on the topic that I would rather read than a research paper with difficult font and full of errors. It loses credibility in my eyes. I might be interested in putting this on my list after professional editing. Thanks for your honest and candid review!

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Post by InStoree » 22 Feb 2019, 14:12

KristyKhem wrote:
19 Feb 2019, 16:33

One of the most exciting things I learned from this book was that language was not only formed as a method of communication, but it acted as a programming tool to help humans exert control over their reality. Furthermore, Western languages were created around nouns or objects which helped Westerners to conceptualize and imagine new ideas, but Eastern languages were formed based on verbs or actions so they placed more importance on activity.
That was attractive, but seems that I need to squeeze my eyes to read it; so, no thanks! I'll wait for a professionally edited version. Thank you for revealing that in your review!
'You just have to Trust Your Own Madness' - Clive Barker :tiphat:

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KristyKhem
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Post by KristyKhem » 22 Feb 2019, 22:00

kandscreeley wrote:
22 Feb 2019, 09:25
You lost me at scientific research paper. Then, honestly, I stopped reading at small font and no spaces between paragraphs. This one is not for me. Thanks, though. Sorry you had to suffer through this one.
I agree, this one isn't for everybody. It was a challenging read but the content was intriguing so I stuck with it to the end.

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KristyKhem
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Post by KristyKhem » 22 Feb 2019, 22:02

PGreen wrote:
22 Feb 2019, 13:09
While I have recently discovered my interest in the evolution of the brain as well as language development, there are many other books on the topic that I would rather read than a research paper with difficult font and full of errors. It loses credibility in my eyes. I might be interested in putting this on my list after professional editing. Thanks for your honest and candid review!
After professional editing, get it because the content is really thought-provoking! Thanks for leaving a comment!

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Post by Cecilia_L » 23 Feb 2019, 18:25

The language development aspect of this book appeals to me, but I think the research/textbook feel of the book would make it difficult to read. Thanks for your interesting review.

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