Review by soccerts -- The Biblical Clock

This forum is for volunteer reviews by members of our review team. These reviews are done voluntarily by the reviewers and are published in this forum, separate from the official professional reviews. These reviews are kept separate primarily because the same book may be reviewed by many different reviewers.
Forum rules
Authors and publishers are not able to post replies in the review topics.
Post Reply
User avatar
soccerts
Posts: 84
Joined: 30 Jan 2019, 16:57
Favorite Book: Farenheit 451
Currently Reading: Theory of Colours
Bookshelf Size: 138
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-soccerts.html
Latest Review: The Unbound Soul by Richard L. Haight

Review by soccerts -- The Biblical Clock

Post by soccerts »

[Following is a volunteer review of "The Biblical Clock" by Daniel Friedmann and Dania Sheldon.]
Book Cover
4 out of 4 stars
Share This Review


How did the earth come to be? Is that a question for a scientist or a priest?

As soon as scientific and religious knowledge became separate subdivisions in the quest for truth, champions of each began fighting to prove their dominance and superiority over the other. Men of reason and men of faith have been in an embittered stalemate for quite some time. Maybe you believe one side has already come out victorious, exposing the other as utter nonsense. But are they really destined to always be on opposite sides of this never-ending war? What if creationism and modern scientific understanding are not so contradictory after all? What if science and religion could be reconciled? That’s the premise behind The Biblical Clock by Daniel Friedmann and Dania Sheldon.

Written in nonfiction narrative, this book takes you from 1290 Israel to 2009 Canada and back again uncovering puzzle pieces to seal the gap between ancient and modern understandings of our world.

We follow Daniel Friedmann’s investigation into the intersection of secular cosmology and ancient scripture. As an engineer and CEO of a space tech company and a lifelong student of religion (Jewish scripture in particular), this is a convergence that he’s uniquely qualified to explore, and a perspective that offers particular insight.

In Part One we follow one ancient thinker’s revelation from before its inception until it is written down, kept preserved through two world wars and a revolution, all the way to its translation and reemergence in the late ‘70s until Daniel discovers it for himself. That text, together with the help of a great many additional sources, launches a kabbalistic mathematical journey that incredibly lines up with the age of the universe as calculated by Hubble’s constant. Speaking of which, this is all happening while Daniel’s company is working on a project to repair the Hubble Telescope — the other extremely disparate method of coming up with the same numbers.

Part Two of the book looks at recorded history in the context of scriptural patterns in order to extrapolate a possible future, and Part Three briefly ties together loose threads, bringing science and scripture into a symbiotic resonance while reflecting on the purpose of life.

Compiling and connecting religious and scientific fact can get very dicey very quickly. What put my mind at ease and allowed me to trust this book was its own self-awareness and acknowledgments of its limitations. The author concedes personal bias upfront and outright. This text is not purporting to be the one and only truth to prove everyone else wrong. It is one man's journey of discovery, sharing how he found harmony in his secular and religious life. If you go into this book with the immutable opinion that religion is idiocy or a conviction that the Big Bang is blasphemous, you will become extremely frustrated. This book is about unifying scripture and modern astrophysical findings. If you’re unwilling to or uninterested in entertaining that marriage, then this is absolutely not the book for you.

That being said, anyone with a genuine interest in scholastic and religious perspectives on the creation of the world will find this an interesting and wonderfully informative read. No preexisting background knowledge is required (although it will certainly enrich the experience). The text is written in an academic style beautifully simplified into an easily digestible narrative form. There are also a number of aids for the lay reader including an extensive glossary (linked in the text of the ebook), maps of pertinent areas, and even pictures to help make archaic history more tangibly comprehensive and relatable.

The book is incredibly well-written and takes care to beautifully contextualize each of its points. Whether or not you will agree with anything in this book, I think it is an enlightening endeavor if read with an open mind.

If I had to make any criticism of the book, it would be that it is written from such a specific viewpoint. Although it is relevant to many other religious leanings, it is only peripherally so as the text only ever considers Judaism in its many facts and figures. That’s a bit of a weak criticism, however, since it was established from the beginning to be one man’s experience questioning the compatibility of faith and fact. One can hardly expect any one man to have multiple religious perspectives. Even so, some readers may find Chapter 10 (which is the only chapter that deals in hypothetical fiction rather than historical commentary) to be politically distasteful since Israel is depicted as the righteous Messiah and Russia, together with her allies, are the incarnation of evil. Again, it is presented as a possibility and not as fact, but I can assume it would be offensive to a Christian Russian reader.

I gave this book a rating of 4 out of 4 stars because it gives a comprehensive and immersive experience of its thesis in an easily understandable and charismatic form. Even though I did not agree with all of the ideas put forth, I came out of this reading feeling enlightened, enriched, and with a better understanding of my own beliefs both similar and dissimilar to the ones presented.

******
The Biblical Clock
View: on Bookshelves

Like soccerts's review? Post a comment saying so!
User avatar
BelleReadsNietzsche
Posts: 472
Joined: 28 Jan 2019, 19:07
Currently Reading: The Handmaid's Tale
Bookshelf Size: 300
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-bellereadsnietzsche.html
Latest Review: I Can See Peace by Julie Penshorn
Reading Device: B00JG8GOWU

Post by BelleReadsNietzsche »

Fascinating. I was immediately skeptical at the beginning of the review, but you addressed my areas of skepticism thoroughly. It sounds like a well-written book that will be relevant to many people, as well as a perspective worth representing.
"The bitter truth we critics must face is that, in the grand scheme of things, the average piece of junk is probably more meaningful than our criticism designating it so." -Ratatouille (2007)
User avatar
soccerts
Posts: 84
Joined: 30 Jan 2019, 16:57
Favorite Book: Farenheit 451
Currently Reading: Theory of Colours
Bookshelf Size: 138
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-soccerts.html
Latest Review: The Unbound Soul by Richard L. Haight

Post by soccerts »

BelleReadsNietzsche wrote: 11 Feb 2019, 02:03 Fascinating. I was immediately skeptical at the beginning of the review, but you addressed my areas of skepticism thoroughly. It sounds like a well-written book that will be relevant to many people, as well as a perspective worth representing.
I'm glad I addressed the points relative to your concerns! It's a precarious topic for sure, but I found it to be a fascinating perspective and quite well done.

P.S. I love your username. :lol2: You're absolutely right.
User avatar
BelleReadsNietzsche
Posts: 472
Joined: 28 Jan 2019, 19:07
Currently Reading: The Handmaid's Tale
Bookshelf Size: 300
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-bellereadsnietzsche.html
Latest Review: I Can See Peace by Julie Penshorn
Reading Device: B00JG8GOWU

Post by BelleReadsNietzsche »

soccerts wrote: 11 Feb 2019, 16:00
BelleReadsNietzsche wrote: 11 Feb 2019, 02:03 Fascinating. I was immediately skeptical at the beginning of the review, but you addressed my areas of skepticism thoroughly. It sounds like a well-written book that will be relevant to many people, as well as a perspective worth representing.
I'm glad I addressed the points relative to your concerns! It's a precarious topic for sure, but I found it to be a fascinating perspective and quite well done.

P.S. I love your username. :lol2: You're absolutely right.
Haha, thanks for the usrrname compliment !
"The bitter truth we critics must face is that, in the grand scheme of things, the average piece of junk is probably more meaningful than our criticism designating it so." -Ratatouille (2007)
User avatar
Firefawkes
Posts: 454
Joined: 27 Dec 2018, 11:17
Currently Reading: Way of Kings
Bookshelf Size: 35
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-firefawkes.html
Latest Review: The Augur's View by Victoria Lehrer

Post by Firefawkes »

I am a science-mind through and through, but it sounds like this book could provide a new perspective! Your review is amazing by the way! :)
User avatar
soccerts
Posts: 84
Joined: 30 Jan 2019, 16:57
Favorite Book: Farenheit 451
Currently Reading: Theory of Colours
Bookshelf Size: 138
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-soccerts.html
Latest Review: The Unbound Soul by Richard L. Haight

Post by soccerts »

Firefawkes wrote: 12 Feb 2019, 23:01 I am a science-mind through and through, but it sounds like this book could provide a new perspective! Your review is amazing by the way! :)
An interesting perspective to be sure. Thanks for stopping by, and I'm glad you enjoyed the review!
User avatar
janinewesterweel
Posts: 214
Joined: 01 Dec 2018, 11:02
Currently Reading: Gangster State
Bookshelf Size: 56
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-janinewesterweel.html
Latest Review: Cooperative Lives by Patrick Finegan

Post by janinewesterweel »

Thanks for this! I was planning to take up the review offer, but couldn't download the book in its format. Disappointing, as I was intrigued by the concept of this comparison. Your thorough and well-written review has now convinced me that I definitely need to get to this one. :)
“Sleep is good, he said, and books are better.” :techie-reference:
― George R. R. Martin

"I’ve always believed that chaos is the muse of creation, and a good story is often driven by the choices made in the wake of madness."
- Matthew Tysz
User avatar
soccerts
Posts: 84
Joined: 30 Jan 2019, 16:57
Favorite Book: Farenheit 451
Currently Reading: Theory of Colours
Bookshelf Size: 138
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-soccerts.html
Latest Review: The Unbound Soul by Richard L. Haight

Post by soccerts »

janinewesterweel wrote: 14 Feb 2019, 05:08 Thanks for this! I was planning to take up the review offer, but couldn't download the book in its format. Disappointing, as I was intrigued by the concept of this comparison. Your thorough and well-written review has now convinced me that I definitely need to get to this one. :)
Sad that you didn't get the review offer, but I'm so glad that this review was helpful and that you enjoyed it! Thanks for stopping by and for the kind words. I hope the book lives up to expectations whenever you get to it! :tiphat:
CatlynnHighlights
Posts: 75
Joined: 19 Jul 2018, 21:12
Currently Reading: Infinite Jest
Bookshelf Size: 63
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-catlynnhighlights.html
Latest Review: Opaque by Calix Leigh-Reign
Reading Device: B00JG8GOWU

Post by CatlynnHighlights »

I normally detest nonfiction novels, but your thorough description really piqued my interest. I've always been interested in the beginning of the world from both a religious and scholarly perspective, so this sounds like an interesting read. I appreciate you taking the time to list the people who might dislike the book, as that is always really helpful when deciding whether or not to read anything.
Comment on my review and I'll comment on yours. I'm always looking for new books to read!

"..one may smile, and smile, and be a villain." - Shakespeare
User avatar
Zimall
Posts: 547
Joined: 17 Sep 2018, 22:06
Favorite Author: Atilla K. Zengin
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 26
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-zimall.html
Latest Review: The Sparrow by Denna M. Davis
fav_author_id: 156933

Post by Zimall »

I read a book from the same author a few months back and it wasn't a very good read for me. Hope this is good one.
Thanks a lot for the review Soccert☺
"All That is Gold Does Not Glitter
Not All Those Who Wander Are Lost"
User avatar
diana lowery
Previous Member of the Month
Posts: 1389
Joined: 11 Feb 2019, 07:39
2021 Reading Goal: 24
Currently Reading: A Thousand Splendid Suns
Bookshelf Size: 198
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-diana-lowery.html
Latest Review: Love Under Construction by Norma Allen
Reading Device: B00IKPYKWG

Post by diana lowery »

Your insightful review, and the fact that your favorite book is Farenheit 451, has convinced me to get out of my comfort zone and give this book a try.
Post Reply

Return to “Volunteer Reviews”