Official Review: The Divinely Sinful Saints

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prospero360
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Official Review: The Divinely Sinful Saints

Post by prospero360 » 31 Jan 2019, 02:12

[Following is an official OnlineBookClub.org review of "The Divinely Sinful Saints" by Con Trong Bui.]
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3 out of 4 stars
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For a lot of people, the world's all-time best selling book, the Bible, is the most difficult book to understand. Why is this so? Is it because the Bible was written in a different time? Or is it because it was translated from Hebrew and a lot of the subtext has been lost in translation? Or is it because a lot of people accept the teachings of men who do not really understand the Bible? I've heard and read about a lot of reasons, but in The Divinely Sinful Saints, Con Trong Bui believes that one of the main reasons people find it hard to understand the Bible is that they read the scriptures literally and fail to seek their spiritual meaning. In this book, the author helps the readers understand many symbols in the Bible, especially from the book of Genesis. He also touches on several misconceptions about the Bible.

Picking up this book, I guessed that it would be about the saints and their sins or how they weren't perfect, but it wasn't what I expected. So, the book title is a bit misleading. However, I'm pleased with the overall content of the book.

The author starts off by asking the reader to imagine what it's like if the first equation used in solving a difficult math problem is wrong or if there is a mistake in the first step in the construction of a large building. The author used this example to show the importance of understanding the first book of the Bible. There were also many instances in the book where Con used similar methods to help readers to fully understand what he was saying, and this was what I liked most about the novel. I also liked that the author used the King James Version of the Bible as the reference to this book, as it is free from denominations. Con also references the different planes of existence from esoteric teachings, which are the physical, emotional, and mental planes. He states that "above all these planes of existence, we have the spiritual plane." This concept is essential to understanding the scriptures. I enjoyed how the author showed how failure to look beyond the physical plane of existence has led to racism.

Furthermore, the book is very repetitive. While I like the repetitive feature of the book, as it gives the reader a constant reference through the text, it isn't a feature that will appeal to some readers. The book is written in an unambiguous language, which is a feature I appreciate in a book that aims to provide clarity on any topic. I agreed with a lot of what the author said, and there were some things I got to fully understand after reading the book, like what it meant when the words "male" and "female" were used in the Bible. There were also a few times I didn't agree with the author, like when he talked about God, the Lord God, and the Lord as three different beings. However, Con doesn't claim to have figured out the whole Bible, but he hopes to help people get a better understanding of the Bible than they have.

I found a few grammatical errors while reading, and most of them involved the use of singular words where plural words should have been used. While the errors didn't derail my reading, the constant changes in the arrangement of the text were distracting. Initially, the references from the Bible were arranged differently from the author's words in an organized way, but as I continued reading, it became inconsistent.

Overall, I enjoyed reading The Divinely Sinful Saints. There was so much to learn from this book about the Bible. I rate this book 3 out of 4 stars. I took out a star because of the editing issues in the book. I would recommend this book to those who hope to get a better understanding of the Bible, and as the author said, "the book is for those who value their spirituality and who ask, seek, and knock but are dissatisfied with the preaching they have heard."

******
The Divinely Sinful Saints
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Post by Chrystal Oaks » 08 Feb 2019, 01:42

Con also references the different planes of existence from esoteric teachings, which are the physical, emotional, and mental planes. He states that "above all these planes of existence, we have the spiritual plane." This concept is essential to understanding the scriptures. I enjoyed how the author showed how failure to look beyond the physical plane of existence has led to racism.

This is not the first time I have read from a book that we should read the Bible from a spiritual perspective. I agree that if everyone could rise above the physical to spiritual; life on earth would probably be better. I gravitate to any book that provides a different perspective about the Bible and am anxious to read it as soon as possible. Thank you for the informative review.

:techie-studyingbrown:

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Post by kandscreeley » 08 Feb 2019, 08:28

Well, I believe most of the Bible is actually meant to be taken literally, with the exception of prophetic books like Revelation. Therefore, I don't think this is a book I would enjoy. I've never been interested in finding the numerology or anything of the sort in the Bible. Thanks, though.
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Post by Jessacardinal » 08 Feb 2019, 13:48

I would not be interested in the repetitiveness of the book. Thank you for sharing a thorough review with us!
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Post by kdstrack » 08 Feb 2019, 14:00

Thank you for this informative review. You do a good job of laying out the author's unique perspective on how to read and understand the Bible. This is not what I thought this book would be about. You're right. The title gave me a very different vision of the contents. Great job.

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Post by nonamer_miss » 08 Feb 2019, 20:55

I was also expecting that this book is about saints and their sins before their proclamation however it is about the holy scripture. I don't like repetitive passages so I'll pass this one. Thanks for an insightful review.

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Post by Cotwani » 09 Feb 2019, 06:11

Indeed the title can throw one way off course! Based on the content of the book, maybe the meant to reiterate how wrong it is to interpret things literally!! Anyway, thanks for the great review!
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Post by ChydeanmahE95 » 09 Feb 2019, 10:07

Christianity and the Bible has always been a topic of debate from time immemorial.
How are we sure that the author's perspective is the right one?
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Post by Tabs1 » 09 Feb 2019, 14:48

I believe the Bible is a book that should be interpreted figuratively. I think the author is trying to guide the reader in the endeavor. Generally I agree that there are very different perspectives from which one understands the Bible thus, I can’t say for sure the author’s is the right one.

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Post by prospero360 » 09 Feb 2019, 22:56

ChydeanmahE95 wrote:
09 Feb 2019, 10:07
Christianity and the Bible has always been a topic of debate from time immemorial.
How are we sure that the author's perspective is the right one?
The author addresses this in the book as well.

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