Review by Lee_Reads -- The Unbound Soul

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Lee_Reads
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Review by Lee_Reads -- The Unbound Soul

Post by Lee_Reads » 10 Aug 2018, 12:15

[Following is a volunteer review of "The Unbound Soul" by Richard L. Haight.]
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4 out of 4 stars
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The Unbound Soul: A Visionary Guide to Spiritual Transformation and Enlightenment by Richard L. Haight is a refreshing book. It is broken down into four parts. In the first part Richard tells about his background, starting with a series of powerful dreams. Richard then sets out on a lifelong journey to discover the essence of Jesus Christ’s teachings. Then, a significant occurrence happens while he is meditating. Later, Richard struggles with understanding or interpreting what has happened and soon strays from his spiritual path. He returns with a new attitude and leaves for Japan to study martial arts. His search for meaning continues as he travels to the East Coast of the United States on a vision quest and while visiting a Quechuan shaman in Ecuador where he participates in a life-changing ceremony.

The second part of the book discusses Richard’s path and goes into meditation techniques, focusing on consciousness. Part three explores daily unfoldment, which covers caring for the mind and body. Finally, part four discusses the soul and spirit. After many years of searching, will Richard find the essence of Jesus Christ’s teachings?

My favorite part of the book was Chapter 13 – Potential Pitfalls. He has superb advice for those who practice meditation or have tried meditation in the past and stopped. This chapter is loaded with gems that describe how to avoid being knocked off the spiritual path. He also covers hang-ups that occur while taking hallucinogens. Due to Richard’s wide range of experiences, I think most people interested in the spiritual path could find something, in The Unbound Soul, that resonates and that could help out as they go throughout life. Also, readers who practice martial arts would enjoy reading about his aiki training in Japan.

I also love that he invented his own words after a meditation session, “insperience” and “Isness,” in order to describe all that is indescribable. Richard comes across as a passionate, down to earth guy who had dedicated his life to seeking out awareness with an open mind and heart. He also has a few other books out and a free audio course, “Taking Spirituality Authority in Daily Life.”

I am rating this book 4 out of 4 stars. It is well-written. Richard’s observations and insights are unique and fascinating, and sure to entertain most readers. Overall, it was a satisfying book that I couldn’t put down. I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in the spiritual path.

******
The Unbound Soul
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joycechitwa
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Post by joycechitwa » 13 Aug 2018, 15:06

This book sound like it is rich in spiritualism and a search for inner peace. The author draws from his own experiences and conclusions to pass across his message. The good thing is that he includes practical suggestions for those who wish to try some of his methods or themselves. The chapter on possible pitfalls to avoid is a definite plus to all keen on succeeding in the meditation sphere. Thanks for this review.

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Post by pixiequeer » 18 Aug 2018, 22:18

There are a lot of errors that I had found, so I gave it 3 out of 4 stars.

This book definitely does have a lot to offer, but I don't think his book really had a whole lot to do with martial arts. Maybe martial arts combined with spirituality, but for someone who isn't spiritual, I don't think they should read it just for the martial arts.

Also, he didn't meditate and then lose his path; he had dreams while he was a kid and promised Jesus he would "find his bones", and he never strayed from that, he just explored it as much as he could.

I do love his insight on meditation and walk-through with observational meditation. His knowledge on it I do find to be quite valuable.

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Lee_Reads
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Post by Lee_Reads » 21 Aug 2018, 20:58

pixiequeer wrote:
18 Aug 2018, 22:18
There are a lot of errors that I had found, so I gave it 3 out of 4 stars.

This book definitely does have a lot to offer, but I don't think his book really had a whole lot to do with martial arts. Maybe martial arts combined with spirituality, but for someone who isn't spiritual, I don't think they should read it just for the martial arts.

Also, he didn't meditate and then lose his path; he had dreams while he was a kid and promised Jesus he would "find his bones", and he never strayed from that, he just explored it as much as he could.

I do love his insight on meditation and walk-through with observational meditation. His knowledge on it I do find to be quite valuable.
The author writes, “After the Isness inspirience (inspirience is my word for any unconditioned experience; its roots are inspire and experience), I found myself in a depression for several years.”

I see your point. He was still exploring during those years of depression.

pixiequeer
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Post by pixiequeer » 31 Aug 2018, 02:35

Lee_Reads wrote:
21 Aug 2018, 20:58
pixiequeer wrote:
18 Aug 2018, 22:18
There are a lot of errors that I had found, so I gave it 3 out of 4 stars.

This book definitely does have a lot to offer, but I don't think his book really had a whole lot to do with martial arts. Maybe martial arts combined with spirituality, but for someone who isn't spiritual, I don't think they should read it just for the martial arts.

Also, he didn't meditate and then lose his path; he had dreams while he was a kid and promised Jesus he would "find his bones", and he never strayed from that, he just explored it as much as he could.

I do love his insight on meditation and walk-through with observational meditation. His knowledge on it I do find to be quite valuable.
The author writes, “After the Isness inspirience (inspirience is my word for any unconditioned experience; its roots are inspire and experience), I found myself in a depression for several years.”

I see your point. He was still exploring during those years of depression.
One common misconception with depression is that if you have it, you don't do anything because you're too depressed to. You can still be depressed and have accomplishments 😊

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