Official Review: Lessons From a Difficult Person

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cpru68
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Official Review: Lessons From a Difficult Person

Post by cpru68 » 01 Aug 2018, 22:07

[Following is an official OnlineBookClub.org review of "Lessons From a Difficult Person" by Sarah H. Elliston.]
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4 out of 4 stars
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In her book, Lessons From a Difficult Person, Sarah H. Elliston helps navigate readers through turbulent waters when it comes to addressing people that we find troublesome. How many times has your phone rang, and when you see a particular person's name on the screen, your heart races, your body trembles and you quickly click 'ignore this call' to avoid confrontation? You make sure to dodge this individual as much as humanly possible because your impression is of a porcupine with sharp quills, and running away seems like the only option to avoid pain. You feel that anything can cause this person to go off and you don't desire to be the target of his or her rants any longer.

Would it surprise you to know that most people whom we label as difficult don't realize the negative impact they are having on others? This is the center point from which this author writes using her own experiences as examples of how to not only assist the offender but to free ourselves from the suffering.

There are easy to read chapters in this helpful guide along with thought-provoking and relevant exercises in each section. The author realizes that a discussion with a prickly person will take courage, and she equips readers with the tools necessary to move in that direction. She gives strategic actions to follow that involve thoughtful preparation. I saw this as putting on armor so that you can go into a conversation and whatever is thrown your way, it will not harm you. You will be able to withstand an onslaught of defense mechanisms and remain ready to offer support and not create further drama. She trains her audience to listen actively and respond with compassion to create a dialogue between the parties to come to a peaceful resolution.

I liked the segment where she spoke about avoidance. Most of us choose this as a way of managing our steps to cope with relationships that leave us worn out from hurt feelings, anger or fear. She does recognize that some people need professional counseling and is an advocate of therapy, but the author instructs on how to start a favorable exchange and what type of language to use in hopes of solving underlying issues.

The author's straightforward approach is refreshing. All the stories from her past leading up to how she discovered inner healing and becoming more self-aware are valuable in a book such as this. She has lived the life of a person who was deemed 'difficult' and was told she was too 'passionate' or 'controlling,' and she uses what was once so painful to teach others how to come up and out of a pit that seems like an impossible trap. Her goal is to shed light on a dark subject instead of letting it hide unaided in the shadows.

I only found a few minor punctuation errors in the book, and these were mainly compound sentences that require commas. The author might want to go back and specifically look over the material one more time and see if those can be remedied. Other than that, it was written with perfection. While the subject may be weighty, the author has done her work to make it easy to read. I would recommend this to anyone who has a broken relationship, or persons who desire to do some self-reflection and want to become more aware of their behavior. For those who do not enjoy self-help books, this isn't the one for you.

I give this book a 4 out of 4 star rating for its exceptional advice from an expert with first-hand knowledge on how to give people a chance to have a better rapport with those around them. I was reminded of this famous saying more than once while reading this book: Do unto others as you would have them do unto you. It could be possible that you are someone's difficult person, and how would you want them to respond to you?

******
Lessons From a Difficult Person
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Post by kandscreeley » 03 Aug 2018, 10:36

I've seen a review for this book before. It sounds like something we could all use. In some ways I think we're all difficult people, and we all certainly need to learn to deal better with others. Thanks for the great review. :)
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Post by Eva Darrington » 03 Aug 2018, 11:35

cpru68 wrote:
01 Aug 2018, 22:07
The author's straightforward approach is refreshing. All the stories from her past leading up to how she discovered inner healing and becoming more self-aware are valuable in a book such as this. She has lived the life of a person who was deemed 'difficult' and was told she was too 'passionate' or 'controlling,' and she uses what was once so painful to teach others how to come up and out of a pit that seems like an impossible trap. Her goal is to shed light on a dark subject instead of letting it hide unaided in the shadows.
It is always refreshing to see someone truly look inward and heal unworkable characteristics. That is really difficult to do. This author sounds like she really dug deep and wants to help others with her discoveries. I recently reviewed Into the Mind, which is also a book about "difficult people". It sounds like the author of your book does a better job of helping others learn what might not be working. You have written a really comprehensive review. Thanks so much.
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Post by Cecilia_L » 03 Aug 2018, 12:27

I liked the segment where she spoke about avoidance. Most of us choose this as a way of managing our steps to cope with relationships that leave us worn out from hurt feelings, anger or fear. She does recognize that some people need professional counseling and is an advocate of therapy, but the author instructs on how to start a favorable exchange and what type of language to use in hopes of solving underlying issues.
I find this particularly interesting. The book as a whole sounds like an enlightening read. Thanks for the recommendation!

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Post by Dael Reader » 03 Aug 2018, 15:24

Oh boy, do I know a lot of difficult people. (I wonder if I'm one too?) This might be an interesting read for me. Nice review!

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Post by Charlaigne » 04 Aug 2018, 23:45

It's so rare to see a book like this. I find lots of material written from the victim's perspective but not from the other side. Might have to look this up. Thanks for the helpful review.

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Post by Yssimnar » 05 Aug 2018, 11:14

cpru68 wrote:
01 Aug 2018, 22:07
[Following is an official OnlineBookClub.org review of "Lessons From a Difficult Person" by Sarah H. Elliston.]
Book Cover
4 out of 4 stars
Share This Review


In her book, Lessons From a Difficult Person, Sarah H. Elliston helps navigate readers through turbulent waters when it comes to addressing people that we find troublesome. How many times has your phone rang, and when you see a particular person's name on the screen, your heart races, your body trembles and you quickly click 'ignore this call' to avoid confrontation? You make sure to dodge this individual as much as humanly possible because your impression is of a porcupine with sharp quills, and running away seems like the only option to avoid pain. You feel that anything can cause this person to go off and you don't desire to be the target of his or her rants any longer.
Okay, I need to read this book. I haven't been speaking with my dad for two years now, and this book might be super helpful. I like that it is written by a self-proclaimed "difficult" person too.
:wink:
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cpru68
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Post by cpru68 » 05 Aug 2018, 14:06

Yssimnar wrote:
05 Aug 2018, 11:14
cpru68 wrote:
01 Aug 2018, 22:07
[Following is an official OnlineBookClub.org review of "Lessons From a Difficult Person" by Sarah H. Elliston.]
Book Cover
4 out of 4 stars
Share This Review


In her book, Lessons From a Difficult Person, Sarah H. Elliston helps navigate readers through turbulent waters when it comes to addressing people that we find troublesome. How many times has your phone rang, and when you see a particular person's name on the screen, your heart races, your body trembles and you quickly click 'ignore this call' to avoid confrontation? You make sure to dodge this individual as much as humanly possible because your impression is of a porcupine with sharp quills, and running away seems like the only option to avoid pain. You feel that anything can cause this person to go off and you don't desire to be the target of his or her rants any longer.
Okay, I need to read this book. I haven't been speaking with my dad for two years now, and this book might be super helpful. I like that it is written by a self-proclaimed "difficult" person too.
You and I have something very much in common. I too am estranged from my dad. It’s been since last January. I think the book will give you some good insight as to how to proceed. She gives good tips on how to emotionally remove yourself from the situation. I have actually found some peace in mine by taking a break and pondering things. Sometimes that is needed to. Blessings to you, and I hope it all works out.
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Post by bookowlie » 08 Aug 2018, 09:50

Thanks for another well-written, insightful review! I love the way you started off the review with something we all can relate to - basically cringing when the phone rings and you see the caller ID is someone you don't want to deal with. The section on avoidance sounds very useful.
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Post by Farmgurl1 » 31 Oct 2018, 07:34

I have read parts of this book before, and I agree the author has some inspirational advice for dealing with difficult people.

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Post by gali » 31 Oct 2018, 07:35

A book that helps readers to deal with difficult people and situations sounds inspiring. I am not surprised that surprise difficult people are not aware that they are difficult. Adding exercises and tools to deal with such people and help difficult people to change is helpful. Thank you for the review!
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Post by sszb » 31 Oct 2018, 07:42

Thank you for detailed and well-described review. I consider myself a difficult person who does not get along with anybody easily. There are still people in my life I want to avoid and ignore for my whole life. This book will be helpful to me. 🥂🥂 To an interesting, the insightful journey towards self-healing process. Thank you and congrats on being BOTD💐💐👍🏻👍🏻.
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Post by Nephyz+254 » 31 Oct 2018, 07:43

I think this book best describe what my interest has always been. I have been struggling to understand humanity and how one can perfectly live in harmony with his neighbors. I like it that the author trains her audience to listen actively and respond with compassion to create a dialogue between the parties in order to come up with a peaceful resolution of whatever the problem in question. Thanks for this wonderful review.

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Post by Misael » 31 Oct 2018, 07:50

The title is very catchy and intiguing. Self-help books are always welcome for these are informative and enriching.

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Post by stacie k » 31 Oct 2018, 07:51

We all have blind spots and possibly don’t realize the ways we are difficult in the eyes of those around us. Although it’s uncomfortable, it can actually be loving to help people become aware of this reality. This self-help book sounds inspiring.
“The tongue of the wise makes knowledge acceptable.” Proverbs 15:2a

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