Official Review: Animals teach us life by Nabi Gueye

Please use this sub-forum to discuss any non-fiction books such as autobiographies or political commentary books.
Forum rules
You must limit each topic thread in this section to only one book or only one series. Make the title of the topic the name of the book, and if possible also include the author's name. If you want to allow spoilers, you must include the word spoilers in the title of the topic, otherwise spoilers are prohibited.
Post Reply
User avatar
MsTri
Posts: 870
Joined: 02 Jul 2017, 12:56
2018 Reading Goal: 12
2017 Reading Goal: 0
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 216
Favorite Book: <a href="http://forums.onlinebookclub.org/shelve ... 15362">The Prodigal Son</a>
Currently Reading: A Game of Thrones
Bookshelf Size: 280
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-mstri.html
Latest Review: People Like Us by Parker T. Pettus
Reading Device: B00L89V1AA
Location: Chicago, IL

Official Review: Animals teach us life by Nabi Gueye

Post by MsTri » 17 Jul 2018, 16:51

[Following is an official OnlineBookClub.org review of "Animals teach us life" by Nabi Gueye.]
Book Cover
3 out of 4 stars
Share This Review


Even though I did not particularly enjoy my school days, I've always considered myself a student of life. However, I've never considered all the lessons that can be learned from our four-legged (or eight-legged or two-finned) friends or not-so-friends. Fortunately, Nabi Gueye has considered just this and has written a handy little guide, Animals teach us life (author's capitalization), to the things we can learn from our furry or scaly neighbors.

In this 51-page booklet, Mr. Gueye focuses on one animal per page, first noting some information about this creature and then advising us on what we can learn from this animal. For instance, we learn that "Thanks to their multiple physiological adaptations, camels can go long periods without drinking or eating, and survive in dry environments. Their humps, for instance, concentrate body fats which are helpful in that matter." Our lesson from such information is that "You need to find out saving strategies to withstand hard times." A student of the Nature Channel, I already knew many of the facts presented but had never related them to the human experience, so I appreciated the parallels. With that being said, I was confused about the sections on the mouse and on the cow. The former's lesson didn't really seem to follow the fact, and the latter's fact and lesson were both related to humans rather than showing how anything benefits the cow itself. Before these factoids, there was a cute little fable starring a parrot, gecko, and wolf; this section very much reminded me of Aesop, thereby making me smile.

Each page also has a picture of the animal in question. They are all actual photographs, and I enjoyed looking at them - except for the arachnid, eew! - though very few of the pictures really exemplify the lesson being taught. I especially liked the pictures of a dog and its human, the panda, and all of the felines, big and small. Some of the pictures are a bit grainy, but that's likely because they were taken in the wild and therefore on the run (or fly or swim).

As much as I liked this little guide, there didn't seem to be any rhyme or reason as to how the animals were arranged. Being the organized sort, I would have preferred if they'd been sectioned alphabetically or according to genus or something.

Sadly, Animals teach us life was littered with grammatical errors, and I found ten errors over the course of the short book. These missteps ran the gamut from punctuation mistakes to missing words to incorrect tense. Additionally, many words that should have been plural were singular and vice-versa. There was also one fragment, one instance when "ones" was used in place of the correct "one's", and one typo. I think English may be a second language for the author, as there were also many sentences that, though grammatically correct, had awkward syntax. I strongly urge Mr. Gueye to hire an editor so that children may learn proper English as well as facts while reading this.

With all things considered, I am forced to give this guide 3 out of 4 stars. If it wasn't for the typographical errors, I might recommend it to children over the age of 12 since some of the words and phrases - like "tenacious" and "arsenal of protection" - are too complex for youngsters of a younger age. I do think adults who are interested in nature may like to while away an hour or so with this book. Readers who like fables and/or analogies may also find something to like therein. If you still need help deciding whether or not to read this, let me offer you words of wisdom from the Parrot's page:
Pay attention to words! They are a double-edged sword. They can serve you well as well as drown you in the deep waters of regret.
******
Animals teach us life
View: on Bookshelves

Like MsTri's review? Post a comment saying so!

User avatar
Cecilia_L
Posts: 643
Joined: 08 Jun 2018, 22:16
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 58
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-cecilia-l.html
Latest Review: Sober and Pissed Off by Jane Zarse

Post by Cecilia_L » 18 Jul 2018, 11:39

Since I'm one who loves finding lessons through nature, I appreciate the premise of this book. Minus the errors, it sounds like a valuable teaching tool. Thanks for the recommendation!

User avatar
Ishaku Yusuf
Posts: 3
Joined: 18 Jul 2018, 08:08
Currently Reading: Farmer Beau's Farm
Bookshelf Size: 15

Post by Ishaku Yusuf » 18 Jul 2018, 12:58

It is good to recommend for children in schools so that they will learn lesson about nature, errors should corrected.

User avatar
crediblereading2
Posts: 780
Joined: 19 Jan 2018, 13:32
Currently Reading: Bitroux
Bookshelf Size: 30
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-crediblereading2.html
Latest Review: Boyhood Dream by John Scully

Post by crediblereading2 » 18 Jul 2018, 13:50

I am telling you that there are a lot of things that us humans can learn from animals. Just look at how a dog nurtures and cares for her pups. Lovely review.

User avatar
Abigail R
Posts: 247
Joined: 17 Jul 2018, 19:46
2018 Reading Goal: 50
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 106
Currently Reading: The Problem of Pain
Bookshelf Size: 65
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-abigail-r.html
Latest Review: Cold Serial: The Jack the Strangler Murders by Brian E. Forschner

Post by Abigail R » 18 Jul 2018, 14:00

Thanks for the review! I work with preschool/ early elementary aged children and I am always looking for new books to help them learn. Although, majority of my kids are learning English as a second language so it is helpful to know of the grammatical errors.
I think I will check this one out my self!

User avatar
Miriam Molina
Previous Member of the Month
Posts: 3579
Joined: 02 May 2017, 20:17
2018 Reading Goal: 48
2017 Reading Goal: 36
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 102
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 125
Currently Reading: A Stained White Radiance
Bookshelf Size: 523
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-miriam-molina.html
Latest Review: Wordstruck! by Susanna Janssen
Reading Device: B00KC6I06S

Post by Miriam Molina » 18 Jul 2018, 20:33

I believe this is the sequel (as promised by the author) to "32 Animals, 32 Lessons" which I reviewed some months back. The grammatical lapses are still the same. The fable (with the parrot, gecko and wolf) seems the same. I am familiar with the camel lesson. The author is lucky I did not pick this book, LOL!

I actually thought the first book was not suited for children because the lessons taught were profound even for adults.

As usual, your review entertained me much.

User avatar
Bonnie Shelby
Posts: 275
Joined: 12 May 2018, 20:07
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 64
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-bonnie-shelby.html
Latest Review: Rage Of A Demon by E.D. Jimenez
Reading Device: B00IKPYKWG

Post by Bonnie Shelby » 18 Jul 2018, 21:10

Whenever the nature channel comes on, I always find myself glued to my seat, fascinated by the wildlife being shown. So despite the grammatical errors, this book sounds like a really interesting, quick read. I also like the idea that we can learn from animals. Thanks for the great review!

User avatar
MsTri
Posts: 870
Joined: 02 Jul 2017, 12:56
2018 Reading Goal: 12
2017 Reading Goal: 0
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 216
Favorite Book: <a href="http://forums.onlinebookclub.org/shelve ... 15362">The Prodigal Son</a>
Currently Reading: A Game of Thrones
Bookshelf Size: 280
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-mstri.html
Latest Review: People Like Us by Parker T. Pettus
Reading Device: B00L89V1AA
Location: Chicago, IL

Post by MsTri » 18 Jul 2018, 22:13

Miriam Molina wrote:
18 Jul 2018, 20:33
I believe this is the sequel (as promised by the author) to "32 Animals, 32 Lessons" which I reviewed some months back. The grammatical lapses are still the same. The fable (with the parrot, gecko and wolf) seems the same. I am familiar with the camel lesson. The author is lucky I did not pick this book, LOL!

I actually thought the first book was not suited for children because the lessons taught were profound even for adults.

As usual, your review entertained me much.
How in the world did I miss that?! Now I've got to go find YOUR review, ha-ha!

User avatar
hsimone
Lilimaster of Bookshelves
Posts: 5162
Joined: 17 Jul 2015, 20:19
2018 Reading Goal: 100
2017 Reading Goal: 100
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 68
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 96
Currently Reading: When Elephants Fly
Bookshelf Size: 428
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-hsimone.html
Latest Review: Oscar: The Friendly Rottweiler by David A Lees
Publishing Contest Votes: 27
Location: Snuggling with a Book :)

Post by hsimone » 20 Jul 2018, 12:43

It's always fun learning about animals, and what a neat idea to tie in with lessons for people. Yes, I agree on the organizational aspect. I would have liked some sort of organization to the introduction to the animals, too. Too bad about the grammatical errors. It's always scary to introduce a book to children when there are errors throughout; it definitely sets a poor example of what good writing looks like. I do like the fable tie-in, but I don't think this one is for me. Thank you for the insightful review, and I'm glad you enjoyed this one!
"Love is patient, love is kind." -1 Corinthians 13:4

User avatar
haleygerstenberg
Posts: 94
Joined: 05 Apr 2018, 23:49
2018 Reading Goal: 24
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 41
Currently Reading: Amusing ourselves to death
Bookshelf Size: 23
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-haleygerstenberg.html
Latest Review: And Then I Met Margaret by Rob White
Location: TX, USA

Post by haleygerstenberg » 20 Jul 2018, 14:00

This sounds like it could be a great book if it had a bit more editing / structure, and maybe the touch of an illustrator - I like this style of book, too bad it isn't polished off.

User avatar
Bianka Walter
Previous Member of the Month
Posts: 757
Joined: 10 Feb 2018, 15:22
2018 Reading Goal: 40
2017 Reading Goal: 0
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 85
Favorite Book: The Old Man and the Sea
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 309
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-bianka-walter.html
Latest Review: Gringo by Dan "Tito" Davis
Reading Device: B00JG8GOWU
Location: South Africa

Post by Bianka Walter » 20 Jul 2018, 15:31

This seems like a really sweet guide. I am a huge fan of Aesop's fables, and from what the parrot says, this definitely has an Aesoppy ring to it (that sounds funny but you know what I mean). Loved your review - thanks so much.
You can find magic wherever you look. Sit back and relax, all you need is a book.
- Dr. Seuss

User avatar
Kat Berg
Posts: 730
Joined: 05 Oct 2017, 22:29
2018 Reading Goal: 100
2017 Reading Goal: 100
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 21
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 8
Favorite Book: <a href="http://forums.onlinebookclub.org/shelve ... 5">Raven's Peak</a>
Currently Reading: The Girl Who Knew Da Vinci
Bookshelf Size: 223
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-kat-berg.html
Latest Review: Toni the Superhero by R.D. Base
Reading Device: B00JG8GOWU

Post by Kat Berg » 20 Jul 2018, 17:43

I do enjoy books about animals, especially when I don't want to read anything heavy, but grammatical errors (and grainy pictures!) are pet peeves and can keep me from enjoying the book. I am glad that you found some enjoyment in it and hope that the author hires an editor! Thanks for the review. :)

User avatar
teacherjh
Posts: 1000
Joined: 15 Apr 2018, 23:16
2018 Reading Goal: 48
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 83
Currently Reading: The 7 Experiment
Bookshelf Size: 286
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-teacherjh.html
Latest Review: The Empty Light of Secrets by M A Street

Post by teacherjh » 21 Jul 2018, 00:47

This sounds like a good pretext for a book.

PS- I hate spiders too.

User avatar
Ginnamassa19
Posts: 210
Joined: 12 Apr 2018, 07:35
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 16
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-ginnamassa19.html
Latest Review: The Unbearable Machine by Megan Voysey

Post by Ginnamassa19 » 22 Jul 2018, 03:40

Oh man, I love animals and books about animals, so this seemed like a book my younger self would have *loved* to read! (It reminds me of this other book called Why Pandas Do Handstands: And Other Curious Truths About Animals by Augustus Brown, which you might enjoy if you liked this one :D) It's a pity about all the errors in this book, though...

Thank you for the detailed critique, I really enjoyed reading it :D

Post Reply

Return to “Non-Fiction Books”