Official Review: Identity 3.0 by Raymond Reed Hardy

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SABRADLEY
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Official Review: Identity 3.0 by Raymond Reed Hardy

Post by SABRADLEY » 07 Jun 2018, 14:38

[Following is an official OnlineBookClub.org review of "Identity 3.0" by Raymond Reed Hardy.]
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3 out of 4 stars
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Identity 3.0: Cutting Edge Personal Development for America’s Baby Boomers focuses on how to uncover one’s true self by exploring personal development theories and participating in growth practices. Raymond Reed Hardy has 30 years of college teaching experience devoted to personal development, and gives the reader access to his research in this 165-page book (Kindle edition).

The book is actually two books rolled into one. The first book is dedicated to a review of the historical headliners in the field of psychology. Referencing the works of Freud, Jung, Skinner, and Rogers, among others, and highlighting various practices and research, Hardy explains the theories that constitute the way a person is molded into adulthood. Based on certain social and moral constructs, growth reaches a point, then ceases, often times remaining on an “as is” basis for the duration of life. In order to continue the process of self-actualization, one needs to embark on a journey of discovery, choosing to acknowledge the shadow facets of their character. Hardy provides advice for getting started on the journey and offers tips for gathering resources and staying on track.

The second book aims to provide “growth-catalyzing exercises.” Hardy starts by examining the “Id” and “superego” more closely so that the reader may understand the tug of war inside their brain and begin to find a balance. From there, he delves into practices that require an earnest effort of self-control and self-discovery. These techniques are primarily designed to be performed in a group setting with a facilitator, and can assist in promoting a sense of awareness for the participants. Some techniques strategically diminish the defense mechanism while others get to the source of long-standing self-judgements that begin at a young age and go unchallenged into adulthood.

I most enjoyed that Hardy uses a variety of principles to approach the process whereby one can achieve personal growth. Rather than just relying on his favorite contributor to the world of psychology, he incorporates many theories. As I read, I noted a practicality to the exercises and gained an understanding of the relevance of exploring one’s full identity. I also liked that the methods are tried and true, with years of experience corroborating Hardy's insights. Especially interesting is his intended audience: the baby boomer generation, who are sure to find this book helpful as they transition into retirement.

I would only recommend this book to a reader determined to explore another dimension of themselves. It is a book based on participation and would be especially illuminating in a group of individuals sharing the common goal of self-discovery. Without the practices, the book can only offer insight into the historical observations of psychology as they relate to personal growth and identity. I have rated the book 3 out of 4 stars, as I noted more than ten errors in grammar and punctuation.

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Identity 3.0
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Post by Bianka Walter » 08 Jun 2018, 06:08

It seems like Hardy did a LOT of reasesrch going into this. I like that the first part of the book gives the reader the psychological backing for his theoies.
Thanks so much for the thorough review 😊
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Post by ParadoxicalWoman » 08 Jun 2018, 07:03

This sounds like an academic book for those who are in psychology field with historical headliners complemented with the theories and I find this book is to be appealing when you mentioned "I would only recommend this book to a reader determined to explore another dimension of themselves."
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Post by kandscreeley » 08 Jun 2018, 08:16

Well, this definitely sounds like a well researched book. It's a bit too heavy and psychological for me. Having never been a fan of that kind of thing nor Freud or any of the others, I'm going to skip this one. Thanks for the information, though.
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Post by Misael » 08 Jun 2018, 09:36

Anything that deals with Psychology greatly interests me a lot; so I will be reading this one the soonest! Thank you for the nice review.

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Post by cristinaro » 08 Jun 2018, 10:49

I'm interested in both the theoretical and practical parts of the book. I've read many books of psychology and pedagogy over the years. You've already got my interest when you mentioned Freud, Yung, Skinner and Rogers. Thanks for your review!
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Post by gen_g » 08 Jun 2018, 10:52

Thanks for the detailed review! This seems like a read that will provoke introspection, which I like, but at the same time, it also seems slightly heavy for me.

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Post by crediblereading2 » 08 Jun 2018, 11:41

Thank you for your very revealing review. I am interested in anything that will aid my personal growth, therefore, I will read this for the future.

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Post by Kemunto lucy » 08 Jun 2018, 14:09

Thanks for the thorough review. Growth books are not for me. I'll pass on this one.

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Post by SamSim » 08 Jun 2018, 16:53

Sounds well-researched and unique, but a bit dry for my taste. Great review, though!
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Post by Sahani Nimandra » 08 Jun 2018, 21:38

Sounds like a well executed read after all it is based on a research of his own. A research has a lot to contribute despite the outcome. Thank you for the introduction!
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Post by joshfee77 » 09 Jun 2018, 06:47

Exploring one’s full identity for personal growth would be a challenging concept for some to embrace, but I believe there would be substantial benefits to approaching this with an open mind. True personal growth necessitates deep self-analysis. Nice review!

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Post by SABRADLEY » 10 Jun 2018, 10:36

Bianka Walter wrote:
08 Jun 2018, 06:08
It seems like Hardy did a LOT of reasesrch going into this. I like that the first part of the book gives the reader the psychological backing for his theoies.
Thanks so much for the thorough review 😊
I liked the background info as well. Thanks for your comment! :)

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Post by SABRADLEY » 10 Jun 2018, 10:39

ParadoxicalWoman wrote:
08 Jun 2018, 07:03
This sounds like an academic book for those who are in psychology field with historical headliners complemented with the theories and I find this book is to be appealing when you mentioned "I would only recommend this book to a reader determined to explore another dimension of themselves."
It certainly has a lot to offer, especially when looking for a place to start the self-discovery process. Thanks for commenting!

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Post by SABRADLEY » 10 Jun 2018, 10:40

kandscreeley wrote:
08 Jun 2018, 08:16
Well, this definitely sounds like a well researched book. It's a bit too heavy and psychological for me. Having never been a fan of that kind of thing nor Freud or any of the others, I'm going to skip this one. Thanks for the information, though.
Haha! I know what you mean. Personally, I'm not big on Freud at all. Thanks for your comment! :)

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