Official Review: ADHD can be improved with your bare hands

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Official Review: ADHD can be improved with your bare hands

Post by inaramid » 31 May 2018, 10:17

[Following is an official OnlineBookClub.org review of "ADHD can be improved with your bare hands" by Norio Ando.]
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2 out of 4 stars
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Everyone will agree that a sick child is a parent’s worst nightmare. A physical illness is one thing; a mental health issue is another. When your child is diagnosed with something like autism or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), what can you do to help?

Norio Ando, a Japanese professor and “certificated clinical psychologist,” writes about childhood developmental disorders and the way they can be alleviated. Having tackled autism in an earlier book, Ando turns his attention to ADHD in ADHD Can Be Improved with Your Bare Hands: Methods for Relaxing Your Hyperactive Child. In just 53 pages, Ando discusses the types of ADHD and cautions against the common response of suppressing hyperactivity. Instead, he offers the principle of “relaxed pleasure” or the “pleasure which we usually feel when we are satisfied with the anticipated results.” Ando then proceeds to describe applications of this principle through simple actions and activities that parents themselves can do. Tickling, arm-swinging, and deep breathing are some examples.

The author starts with a disclaimer that his English is not that good, adding, “Please teach me when you find mistakes.” This openness to suggestions is a praiseworthy quality, and it bolsters the impression that the book was written to genuinely impart knowledge that can help those in need. Given everything, however, it pains me to rate this book a measly 2 out of 4 stars. Beyond the nobility of its purpose and the possible value of its contents, ADHD Can Be Improved with Your Bare Hands needs a ton of improvement itself before it can stand the scrutiny of the psychological community and be deemed ready for public consumption. If the author should keep his mind open a bit longer, please let me offer a few suggestions.

First, the book’s credibility needs to be established. Mental illness is a grave topic, so any suggested method, procedure, or treatment should be research-based and outcomes-based. The book did include three case studies of two two-year-olds and a four-year-old, but there was nothing for the higher age ranges for which the book also offered some suggested methods. I was also bothered by the absence of references and citations, particularly because the view of ADHD (typology, etiology, etc.) departs from the standards set by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) published by the American Psychological Association (APA). While the book's take on ADHD is intriguing, it doesn’t help that the wording is imprecise (“I think there are three kinds of ADHD…”). The legal disclaimer, too, did not inspire a lot of confidence, as Ando warns that one method can cause dislocation, and the other, concussion.

This brings me to my second point: the book definitely needs a hard edit to improve structure and organization and enhance clarity and readability. Problems in the use of punctuations, prepositions, and articles make the text challenging to read. Awkward phrasings are also common. Most are undoubtedly results of mistranslations, but statements like, “When he feels relaxed displeasure by being stimulated, his resignation is promoted,” and “Jiggling child’s body, making him bend backwards, pleasantly,” are bound to be misinterpreted by a fluent English speaker. Thankfully, there were illustrations accompanying the text, and while a bit crude and unclear at times, they were helpful in clarifying what the methods should look like.

Finally, the presentation of information served as a barrier to comprehension. For this, I’d recommend indicating the page numbers in the "Contents" page for easy reference, defining the concept of relaxed pleasure before advising it, moving the last chapter (where a key conceptual framework is presented) to the front, and weaving the case studies throughout the discussion of the methods. I’d also commission a graphic designer to redraw the illustrations and to reformat the book.

Overall, ADHD Can Be Improved with Your Bare Hands has the potential to be a groundbreaking guide in the mental health arena; however, I will hold off recommending this book to anyone until further editing can occur. Until then, I wish the author success in this endeavor.

******
ADHD can be improved with your bare hands
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Post by ButterscotchCherrie » 02 Jun 2018, 02:06

Thanks for another informative review. As with the now-discredited hypothesis about the causes of autism ("refrigerator mothers"), the last thing parents need is to be judged or feel guilty that they didn't "jiggle" their child more. I agree that it's crucial for any proposed therapy to be research- and evidence-based.

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Post by gen_g » 02 Jun 2018, 04:16

Thanks for a detailed review. It is a pity that the book is not edited professionally, as the potential for being a great reference is so obviously there.

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Post by Kalin Adi » 02 Jun 2018, 13:07

The legal disclaimer, too, did not inspire a lot of confidence, as Ando warns that one method can cause dislocation, and the other, concussion.
So the solution would be worse than the problem??? My goodness! These solutions seem quite rough. When I read the title, I got happy because this is a topic I'm very interested. However, if it isn't a well researched book, the information in there isn't solid and lacks credibility. What a shame! Thanks for the warnings about this book!

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Post by EuniceGrace » 02 Jun 2018, 13:13

Many people do not understand mental illness that well so books like this one are what they use a point of reference therefore the author needs to correct all the mistakes and also improve on the punctuation because even a coma can change the meaning of the whole sentence, however its a good and helpful book if changes are made and more research done

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Post by inaramid » 02 Jun 2018, 20:09

ButterscotchCherrie wrote:
02 Jun 2018, 02:06
Thanks for another informative review. As with the now-discredited hypothesis about the causes of autism ("refrigerator mothers"), the last thing parents need is to be judged or feel guilty that they didn't "jiggle" their child more. I agree that it's crucial for any proposed therapy to be research- and evidence-based.
The rationale behind the methods seems more common sense than anything else. They could be valid, but I was really missing some form of research-based information.

gen_g wrote:
02 Jun 2018, 04:16
Thanks for a detailed review. It is a pity that the book is not edited professionally, as the potential for being a great reference is so obviously there.
In some way, perhaps it was, but not by a fluent English speaker.

Kalin Adi wrote:
02 Jun 2018, 13:07
So the solution would be worse than the problem??? My goodness! These solutions seem quite rough. When I read the title, I got happy because this is a topic I'm very interested. However, if it isn't a well researched book, the information in there isn't solid and lacks credibility. What a shame! Thanks for the warnings about this book!
The phrasing of the disclaimer did get me expecting some radical form of treatment. To my surprise though, most included tickling the child, chasing the child, and generally playing with the child. The idea is just to burn up the child's energy and allow him/her to feel pleasure in relaxation, to reinforce the idea that inertia isn't such a bad thing and make a hyperactive child actually crave inactivity.

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Post by ButterscotchCherrie » 03 Jun 2018, 01:12

The phrasing of the disclaimer did get me expecting some radical form of treatment. To my surprise though, most included tickling the child, chasing the child, and generally playing with the child. The idea is just to burn up the child's energy and allow him/her to feel pleasure in relaxation, to reinforce the idea that inertia isn't such a bad thing and make a hyperactive child actually crave inactivity.
[/quote]

I've sometimes wondered if I have adult ADD, and had read that exercise can help a lot. It does feel better. I should really get round to getting diagnosed, though.

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Post by Nimat87 » 03 Jun 2018, 04:43

If this book is effectively edited and its findings thoroughly researched, I believe it could be helpful for parents with children affected by ADHD. The methods described seem to be unharmful and even playful.
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Post by CommMayo » 03 Jun 2018, 10:29

Seems like this book could almost be dangerous if read by someone who takes everything as fact.

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Post by stacie k » 03 Jun 2018, 17:07

I had high hopes for a book that would provide practical advice for families who are at a loss for how to help their ADHD-diagnosed children. The lack of research is disappointing. Thanks for your fair evaluation of this book.
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Post by kandscreeley » 03 Jun 2018, 18:10

I would love to see some books on how parents can help their children with ADHD or autism. However, in its current format, I don't think this is a book that I would suggest for that purpose. Hopefully if the author takes your suggestions, this can be something worth trying. Thanks!
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Post by inaramid » 03 Jun 2018, 22:47

EuniceGrace wrote:
02 Jun 2018, 13:13
...however its a good and helpful book if changes are made and more research done
Yes, it will be. Thanks for dropping by.

ButterscotchCherrie wrote:
03 Jun 2018, 01:12
I've sometimes wondered if I have adult ADD, and had read that exercise can help a lot. It does feel better. I should really get round to getting diagnosed, though.
:D :D
Nimat87 wrote:
03 Jun 2018, 04:43
If this book is effectively edited and its findings thoroughly researched, I believe it could be helpful for parents with children affected by ADHD. The methods described seem to be unharmful and even playful.
Yes, it does. I do hope to see an edited version of this.

CommMayo wrote:
03 Jun 2018, 10:29
Seems like this book could almost be dangerous if read by someone who takes everything as fact.
Thank you for pointing this out. Yes, I agree. The illustrations look more like cartoon strips too. Maybe using actual photographs might help.

stacie k wrote:
03 Jun 2018, 17:07
I had high hopes for a book that would provide practical advice for families who are at a loss for how to help their ADHD-diagnosed children. The lack of research is disappointing. Thanks for your fair evaluation of this book.
Thanks for dropping by. Scientific validity should be a prerequisite for things like these.

kandscreeley wrote:
03 Jun 2018, 18:10
I would love to see some books on how parents can help their children with ADHD or autism. However, in its current format, I don't think this is a book that I would suggest for that purpose. Hopefully if the author takes your suggestions, this can be something worth trying. Thanks!
I hope he does, too! Thank you for commenting.

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Post by Social Butterfly » 04 Jun 2018, 07:07

Dislocation? The author should re-visit his research methods because no parent with an ADHD child wants him or her to get worse.
I was intrigued by this book because I'm very passionate about the subject but it seems this book needs more work on illustrations, editing and research. Thanks for your detailed review :tiphat:

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Post by inaramid » 04 Jun 2018, 08:58

Social Butterfly wrote:
04 Jun 2018, 07:07
Dislocation? The author should re-visit his research methods because no parent with an ADHD child wants him or her to get worse.
I was intrigued by this book because I'm very passionate about the subject but it seems this book needs more work on illustrations, editing and research. Thanks for your detailed review :tiphat:
Strange, isn't it? It may have been a requirement for him to indicate that. There's danger in swinging a child's arm, after all. Still, I found it alarming.

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Post by teacherjh » 04 Jun 2018, 17:20

Wow. I was hoping this one had some helpful strategies. I guess not. Thanks for the review.

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