Featured Official Review: Food Bank Britain by Ray Barron-Woolford

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bluesky5_
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Re: Featured Official Review: Food Bank Britain by Ray Barron-Woolford

Post by bluesky5_ » 04 Jul 2018, 22:18

:x I lived in Miami, Florida and saw everyday, homeless people standing at intersections with signs "Hungry, please help" These homeless people had no desire to clean themselves up, try to get work, and they camped out under overpasses. If you didn't give them money, they would berate you. If you gave them a sandwich, they would throw it away. There are many food banks in Miami as well. And corruption.

If the state of Florida was to plant many orange trees and mango trees, lime tree's, and any food bearing tree's in area's where the homeless habitat's are, and design a "maintenance co-op" I believe people who cannot afford to buy food would be able to eat. I feel that learning to grow crops would put a dent in hunger in America. It is understood that not every state could do this year-round but even some of the months, as well as creating more greenhouses.

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Post by King+faith » 04 Jul 2018, 23:36

Great review, hunger and poverty is commonly associated with Africans, but the insight from the book had made me understand that such is not peculiar to Africa. I am from Nigeria, aside the 3 factors you named as causes of poverty in Africa, the top list is corruption. It is deadly here, government wast common wealth of the nation and leave their country in ruins. I have not heard of food bank in Nigeria made to assist poor hungry citizens, even if there is, would the food get to those poor and hungry citizens? Corrupt among government officials is the biggest challenge in Nigeria. Although I will research to know where it is located. I will personally want to establish one in rural area of Nigeria. There is a lot of hunger here. Thanks for the insight, you were great.

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Post by paulitfaa » 05 Jul 2018, 01:14

Food banks are commonly associated with dictatorships especially in communist countries.However to say they are not helpful even to western democracies is a farce. Books like this one are an inspiration for community leaders.

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Post by adrole yelstine » 05 Jul 2018, 07:37

Its very interesting story for one to read as the writer accurately tried his level best to bring out the real issue in the content of the story . conguratulations

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Post by Miganda1 » 05 Jul 2018, 08:58

when i always think of banks,i see money, lots of money.
Ray Barron Woolford just made me think of something different "food bank"
Africa and especially kenya where i live is experiencing food shortages to the extreme.This is an issue that is affecting many countries and soon it will wipe out the human generation.
Thanks to this book "food bank" for digging deep into this problem.

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Post by Britty01 » 05 Jul 2018, 09:11

Miriam Molina wrote:
14 Apr 2018, 22:20
How sad that even in the first world, people can go hungry! In my country, a lot of government resources are lost to corruption; these funds could be used to ensure food-sufficiency (and other worthwhile endeavors) for all. I wonder if it is also corruption that is the culprit in the British scenario.

In the early Christian communities, all the believers shared all they had, and nobody was in want. Can we say that we have progressed at all, seeing that many don't have enough to eat? Food for thought.
I am sure that is one part of the scenario, but corruption occurs in all aspects of society even in the 'charitable' organizations themselves. If nothing else books like this one give people around the world an opportunity to see another side of life in the Western World.

The United Kingdom is one of the top 10 biggest economies in the world (that is England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Island). England itself is the 25th largest in the world by population, that is 84% of the United Kingdom as a whole. There are approximately 713 people per square mile. That puts a strain on housing, house prices there are unbelievable in most areas. I think overpopulation in any part of the natural world is going to play a large factor, corruption and greed are others.

Food banks as we know them, do not eradicate food insecurity, I do not think they ever can. They may be useful in short term and I am glad to some degree that they are there. I understand ancient Egyptians stored grain to get them through severe droughts, how that worked out for the average person I don't think we will ever know. In smaller communities, Christian or otherwise, I can see sharing resources working in most cases becauses the members of the community have an 'investment' in doing their part. I sometimes wonder if, when someone is given too much unwittingly the giver has taken away that persons sense of pride, self-respect or reason to rebuild their life, resulting in a feeling of resentment towards the giver. That being said, I am glad there are resources for those in a temporary crisis.

As you mentioned, when society is able to identify the root of the problems, work together to solve them in a way that is not detrimental to the community as a whole, then we may begin real progress.

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Post by Sibhone1 » 05 Jul 2018, 15:03

It's not only shocking but incredible. Everyone assumes and knows about food shortage in Africa but world powers like Britain, nobody would believe that. I find it even more unsettling that some would rather commit suicide than starve to death. Children not going to school due to hunger astounded me. This book could serve in enlightening the world that we all have suffering people who need our help. Food banks are a good idea but as individuals we can donate to feed the starving. I think the idea to privately do individual organizations to help out could be a step forward. If people in each country donated even five percent each to help the starving in their countries, we would make a huge difference.

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Post by Britty01 » 05 Jul 2018, 17:58

Sibhone1 wrote:
05 Jul 2018, 15:03
It's not only shocking but incredible. Everyone assumes and knows about food shortage in Africa but world powers like Britain, nobody would believe that. I find it even more unsettling that some would rather commit suicide than starve to death. Children not going to school due to hunger astounded me. This book could serve in enlightening the world that we all have suffering people who need our help. Food banks are a good idea but as individuals we can donate to feed the starving. I think the idea to privately do individual organizations to help out could be a step forward. If people in each country donated even five percent each to help the starving in their countries, we would make a huge difference.
It is unsettling. A loss of hope, stress of dealing with Government agencies and the fear of their future might lead a person to that. In Britain, they think Debtors prisons and workhouses were a terrible thing of the past. Sometimes, in some ways I wonder if society has improved that much since then. As for children not going to school - I am not sure how they would have the energy to get through the day if they are without food for long periods. Schools are meant to provide a free meal for children in need, though it is reported more than 1 million children in poverty do not get that benefit. It bothers me more that those children are vulnerable to those that might take advantage of them by plying them with food. That is a topic I don't think gets the attention it deserves. Perhaps books like this one will help raise public awareness.

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Post by Sibhone1 » 06 Jul 2018, 00:23

I agree. It torments me when children get taken advantage of especially since they are hungry and have lost hope, with no one to protect them from the scavengers that roam society.

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Post by Dabuddhababe » 06 Jul 2018, 05:51

The review started out a little slow for me, but all the juicy stuff was at the end. I love that the high points of the book are pointed out. Reading about Food Banks could be boring, but it deeper than that.

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Post by Good7girl » 06 Jul 2018, 08:28

After reading this review I can say that I admire those young people for taking an interest in feeding the less fortunate. Feeding the hungry is a world wide problem. What an lovely, heart- felt project and will soon travel all over the world.

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Post by Faithmwangi » 06 Jul 2018, 09:54

Coming from a place where poverty and food inadequacy is almost an everyday topic, I know a food bank would be much appreciated.Thank you for the detailed, informative and insightful review.

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Post by Book Bear » 06 Jul 2018, 10:45

I've just purchased a copy of this book and it certainly dispels the myths that are rife in the UK about who exactly are using food banks and why. The why is very very interesting. It shows the structure of society failing people on an increasingly large scale. It's quite shocking. I was disappointed in the size of the book. Too small for such a huge subject.

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Post by Book Bear » 06 Jul 2018, 12:17

Dolor wrote:
15 Apr 2018, 02:14
Miriam Molina wrote:
14 Apr 2018, 22:20
How sad that even in the first world, people can go hungry! In my country, a lot of government resources are lost to corruption; these funds could be used to ensure food-sufficiency (and other worthwhile endeavors) for all. I wonder if it is also corruption that is the culprit in the British scenario.

In the early Christian communities, all the believers shared all they had, and nobody was in want. Can we say that we have progressed at all, seeing that many don't have enough to eat? Food for thought.
Thanks for dropping by my review and leaving a thought-provoking food for thought.

Corruption is the main cause of our country's poverty, but in Britain, the author stressed more on high rents, low wages, and delayed social benefit funding.

By the way, you might wanna check out my latest review "The Social Tattoo". It's about awareness and responsibility of parents with kids on social media.


I'm in the UK and as well as high rents, low wages, delayed and sanctioned benefits, there is high inflation, low interest rates (money you save has little value in savings accounts), cheap food is often rubbish food so your health suffers and there is a real culture of bashing people on benefits. If you are on a low wage and/or on benefit it is almost impossible to get out of it. Social mobility, as they call it, is difficult. This book is an eye opener. However, in my opinion it isn't hard hitting enough. I'm still only half way through. Also it is way too short. There are so many issues that could be explored more so that people get a real flavour of just how bad it can be.

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Post by Gyde » 08 Jul 2018, 04:34

Coming from African countries you get to see people starving others committing suicide due to poverty.Stealing instead of asking Which has been captured by the author and they are current situations happening in the world today.The issue on food bank is a new idea to me and I think this book can be a recommendation to a lot of people that can make our government borrow this idea to help the poor and those starving

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