Official Review: My God, My Money by Judith Allwood

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Paul78
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Official Review: My God, My Money by Judith Allwood

Post by Paul78 » 03 Feb 2018, 13:04

[Following is an official OnlineBookClub.org review of "My God, My Money" by Judith Allwood.]
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3 out of 4 stars
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A parable was told of a certain wretched individual and a rich man. The rich person enjoyed his riches on earth, while the poor fellow had his wounds licked by the wealthy man’s dogs. In the end, the poor man died, and angels took him to heaven. The rich man also died and found himself in hell. While in hell, he is reminded of the good life he enjoyed, while poor Lazarus was having it rough. In many church sermons, this parable is mostly used, as a reference whenever the topic of riches is preached. One would ask, is getting rich evil? Is it ungodly to be wealthy? Judith Allwood, an avid Bible scholar, in her self-published 42 chapter book, My God, My money, finding balance between your money and your faith, explores this topic with an aim of helping Christians, consider and apply the biblical teachings on money in their lives.

The introduction depicts the author’s belief that most affluent people have obtained their wealth through exploitation of the poor. Having been raised up in a Christian community, whose teachings emphasized the importance of modest lifestyle, and how impossible it is for the rich to inherit the Kingdom of God, she had resolved only to work hard to get the hard cash needed to pay her bills. Any income earned besides her normal work would supplement the settlement of bills, besides adding up to her savings for a rainy day. On several occasions, she would find herself embarrassed at clutching any book whose title had the word rich. The major challenge faced was that despite many attempts to save, several issues would arise depleting her savings. At this point, she started wondering why was it that Christians believed in God who owns the world, were poor, and always broke. This became the turning point as she searched for a more profound understanding of the biblical teachings about money.

The author begins by acknowledging God as the source of all wealth. She dispels various misconceptions on bible doctrine towards responsible wealth creation behind the cynical attitude among many Christians. The author further cautions the rich against attributing their wealth only to their efforts. On the apparent change of character in those that have accumulated wealth, she records, “money does not create a new character on people, I believe it brings out what is at the core of who you are”. But then, Christians have been castigated on slackness, complacency, self-debasement instead of true humility, among other beliefs and attitudes that would be blamed for their vulnerable financial position. Correct views towards giving, paying of tithes, creating growth fund, and succession planning have been given at length. Apart from giving biblical references, she has used examples of people who have been successful in real-estate investment, entrepreneurship, forums attended that challenge the incorrect belief systems among them, just to name a few. This being a devotional guide, the author has among other things emphasized the importance of prayer, contentment, and living a life without worries to a Christian.

As earlier mentioned, My God, My Money is a Christian devotional study book. The reader is advised to read this book while meditating on the bible. At the end of each chapter, some questions assist the reader in making a personal reflection and apply the points learned in his life. In addition, a brief prayer is provided to aid the reader have a prayerful meditation. Most devotional study guides that I have read, have these features, which are helpful. The language used is simple and easy to understand. The content in the chapters had a logical flow making the book easier to read. Although the author has recommended forty days, I found myself reading it within weeks. While going through her account of the story of Cain and Abel, I made a startling discovery despite having studied it several times before.

Although the book seems to have been professionally edited, I found a few grammatical mistakes. For instance, the noun he when one is referring to a deity, should be capitalized. When reading through the examples provided, I was tempted to think the author was using fictional characters rather than real people. Most examples would describe a certain workshop or person without giving the names. Devotional study guides that are authoritative use real persons or situations that anyone can confirm their accuracy. Having taken note of the above points of concern, I give the book 3 out of 4 stars. This book is a must-read for all those Christians who would like to gain knowledge of Biblical principles wealth and money. As for those looking for professional financial guidance, there is a disclaimer since the author is not an expert in that field.

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Post by LeeClassic » 16 Feb 2018, 13:52

Money does not create a new character in a person.. It brings out what is at the core of who one is.

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Post by EWatson02 » 16 Feb 2018, 17:27

This is an excellent review. Though I'm not really religious myself, I believe it's important to have a religious understanding of finances and the handling of money if just because we've been seeing a lot of people in the media lately who are incredibly rich (for example, Donald Trump, Elon Musk, and Jeff Bezos, among others). Some of these same folks profess to be Christian themselves, and I think a decent question to ask is "do these people and their obscene amounts of wealth actually follow the teachings of the god they supposedly worship?"

So who knows, I might give this a shot. Thank you for your thoughtful input!

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Post by ParadoxicalWoman » 16 Feb 2018, 21:48

Thank you for your insightful review! I hope I'm given a chance to check out this book will myself.
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Post by Paul78 » 17 Feb 2018, 02:02

EWatson02 wrote:
16 Feb 2018, 17:27
This is an excellent review. Though I'm not really religious myself, I believe it's important to have a religious understanding of finances and the handling of money if just because we've been seeing an lot of people in the media lately who are incredibly rich (for example, Donald Trump, Elon Musk, and Jeff Bezos, among others). Some of these same folks profess to be Christian themselves, and I think a decent question to ask is "do these people and their obscene amounts of wealth actually follow the teachings of the god they supposedly worship?"

So who knows, I might give this a shot. Thank you for your thoughtful input!
Thanks for your compliments. We also have Christians who are extremely wealthy and have seen many underprivileged enjoy their acts of charity.
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Post by jaylperry » 17 Feb 2018, 02:34

Thank you for this informative review. As a pastor and financial coach, I am always interested to find books that purport to give the Bible's stance on wealth and money. It sounds like the author has a specific viewpoint that may not be very helpful. If she believes most wealthy people got that way through exploitation, there is really no reason for me to want to do well with my finances. The more I squander, the more I can look holy.

This looks like a book I would want to read for myself to see what I could learn from it.
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Post by cristinaro » 17 Feb 2018, 11:33

The topic of religion is as controversial as ever. Thank you for your review.
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Post by Paul78 » 17 Feb 2018, 12:01

jaylperry wrote:
17 Feb 2018, 02:34
Thank you for this informative review. As a pastor and financial coach, I am always interested to find books that purport to give the Bible's stance on wealth and money. It sounds like the author has a specific viewpoint that may not be very helpful. If she believes most wealthy people got that way through exploitation, there is really no reason for me to want to do well with my finances. The more I squander, the more I can look holy.

This looks like a book I would want to read for myself to see what I could learn from it.
The author originally believed that the wealthy had exploited the poor to acquire their riches. Her turning point came when she wondered why Christians were always poor and broke yet God owns the whole world.

In the book, she has explored several Bible characters that were truly wealthy.

This is a book you will find enjoyable to read.
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Post by kandscreeley » 17 Feb 2018, 15:52

This sounds like a great devotional with good guidelines. I don't think all Christians can expect to be rich, but everyone could learn how to handle money better. Thanks for the review.
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Post by CommMayo » 18 Feb 2018, 18:31

This book isn't something that I would grab off of a shelf, but your review is in-depth and really well written. Great job on this one!

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Post by Paul78 » 18 Feb 2018, 18:34

CommMayo wrote:
18 Feb 2018, 18:31
This book isn't something that I would grab off of a shelf, but your review is in-depth and really well written. Great job on this one!
Thanks for your comment.
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Post by Paul78 » 19 Feb 2018, 00:15

kandscreeley wrote:
17 Feb 2018, 15:52
This sounds like a great devotional with good guidelines. I don't think all Christians can expect to be rich, but everyone could learn how to handle money better. Thanks for the review.
Thanks for the reply. It is important to note that Christians should always plan to excel in what they do. Look at even the top civil servants in the Bible like Daniel, Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego. Those guys were not poor.
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Post by Paul78 » 20 Feb 2018, 11:15

ParadoxicalWoman wrote:
16 Feb 2018, 21:48
Thank you for your insightful review! I hope I'm given a chance to check out this book will myself.
This is a great book to read. One will always find something new to learn from this author. Thanks for your comments.
An investment in knowledge pays the best interest.
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Post by Paul78 » 20 Feb 2018, 11:18

kandscreeley wrote:
17 Feb 2018, 15:52
This sounds like a great devotional with good guidelines. I don't think all Christians can expect to be rich, but everyone could learn how to handle money better. Thanks for the review.
I appreciate your observations. The main aim of this book is for Christians to understand that they can be financially independent while they are still practising their faith.
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Post by Kat Berg » 25 Feb 2018, 20:10

I appreciate well-intended guidance on how to honor God with your finances. I am always a little cautious to do these kinds of devotionals. There are so many that focus on money, or weight, or you name it. And sometimes they are helpful, sometimes not so much. Not sure that I would enjoy one that was meant for 40 days. That seems like a long time on the subject. But I appreciate your review.

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