Review of From Brokenness to Atonement, Faith, Hope, and Love: A Vietnam War Sniper’s Journey and a Psychiatrist&r

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Joy Wendy
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Review of From Brokenness to Atonement, Faith, Hope, and Love: A Vietnam War Sniper’s Journey and a Psychiatrist&r

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[Following is an official OnlineBookClub.org review of "From Brokenness to Atonement, Faith, Hope, and Love: A Vietnam War Sniper’s Journey and a Psychiatrist’s Biblioth" by Hani Raoul Khouzam MD;MPH;FAPA..]
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5 out of 5 stars
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Growing up in an orphanage has several negative mental implications for children. For many of them, it completely throws them into a state of loneliness, self-dependency, and emotions of all sorts. From Brokenness to Atonement, Faith, Hope, and Love: A Vietnam War Sniper’s Journey and a Psychiatrist’s Biblioth is the story of Mr. L, an orphan who later became a Vietnam War sniper. The story is told by the author and psychiatrist, Hani Raoul Khouzam.

The story started with the psychiatrist encountering a patient, Mr. L, who needed prompt psychiatric attention following his left eye surgery. A stranger event was Mr. L singing Happy Birthday in French while in his REM sleep. These events made Hani Raoul Khouzam miss out on a special documentary on the life and death of former Egypt’s president, Anwar al-Sadat. Mr. L eventually awoke from his sleep and shared much of his childhood with his psychiatrist. Mr. L was a male veteran who served in the United States Army during the Vietnam War. Although raised in an orphanage, he excelled in the army and was much celebrated. He owed this to a certain Carmelite nun, Soeur Marie. She was committed to helping detached children like Mr. L find themselves again. He was now given to service as a matter of calling. However, all was not going to be rosy. Challenges kicked in that brought back old demons he didn’t know were even there. How did Mr. L deal with these problems? Was he going to give in to brokenness for the rest of his life? What role did his psychiatrist play in all these? The reader will embark on a journey to find the answers to these questions by reading this book.

I really liked this book. It was a well-told story of depression, survivor’s guilt, and delayed-onset posttraumatic stress disorder masked by bitterness and anger. I enjoyed how the writer blended history with his story. He also provided a solid background story to help readers empathize with each character. Additionally, I appreciated the sequential revelation of events, as this made it easy to follow the story. I learned several lessons as a bonus. The author’s will to learn and his approach to psychiatry were commendable.

I did not dislike anything about this book. It was an enjoyable read. Although I noticed a few editorial issues, the book was nicely edited. The errors did not disrupt my reading.

I rate this book five out of five stars because I enjoyed reading it and could not fault anything about the author’s storytelling style. I recommend the book to everyone interested in overcoming and helping others overcome mental health challenges. Lovers of history will also find this book an enjoyable read.

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From Brokenness to Atonement, Faith, Hope, and Love: A Vietnam War Sniper’s Journey and a Psychiatrist’s Biblioth
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