Review of Celestial Music

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Guda LM
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Latest Review: Celestial Music by Arturo Cuscó

Review of Celestial Music

Post by Guda LM »

[Following is an official OnlineBookClub.org review of "Celestial Music" by Arturo Cuscó.]
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4 out of 4 stars
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Does gazing upon the night sky give you a feeling of harmony? Do you ever wonder why? Arturo Cuscó seeks to answer these questions and more. He writes, ‘There is religious, mathematical, and musical significance to the numbers 5, 10, 12, 20, 50, 260, 466, 1,000, 1,400, 1,500, and 12,000. Every single one of them appears in our ancient religions’ scriptures, and their appearances at times reflect what these distances in our solar system mean to consciousness.’ He further postulates that brain waves and our Solar System are one resonant system.

Through one of his research projects, Arturo began studying consciousness as a vibrational phenomenon and related the expanse of the heliosphere to our brain’s function and intuitive senses. Additionally, the book compares the heliosphere diameter and lengths of various celestial bodies to different types of brainwaves, their frequencies, and wavelengths. Arturo then theorizes that music is more than stacked frequencies and overtones. Music creates space for diversity in the cosmos and inspires our spirituality and journey to understand consciousness.

Celestial Music is a thought-provoking and mind-bending book that comprises thirteen lively and intriguing chapters. The author provides sufficient evidence to back up his writing and references for further research at the reader’s pleasure. The author speaks directly to the reader, simulating a one-on-one conversation. The author additionally uses well-known Greek mythologies, stories from the Bible, and other major religions to reinforce his points and statements. This is quite helpful, especially in comprehending challenging or new concepts.

My favorite aspect of the book is the graphics, artful illustrations, and astronomy-themed pages. The pictures that represent the various celestial bodies under discussion are large and perceptive. Some depictions are symbolic, like that of the Earth, Mercury, or Saturn, which are distinctive and reflect their dominant features. There are also charts and tabular representations of some of the information, making it easier to perceive the relationships, especially where large numbers are involved. My only issue is the font color against the page backgrounds, which irritates the eyes and disrupts the read.

Celestial Music is excellently and exceptionally edited since I did not find any grammar errors. It does not contain any profanity, sexual sensitivity, or otherwise. However, it is a technical read that requires a curious and intellectual mind. The book mentions several religions from a research point of view and not divinity. The author uses examples from stories in the Bible, Buddhist teachings, Hindu religion, ancient Greek, and the Yogis. The book seeks to help us recognize the significance of the cosmos in our past, present, and future lives. It strives to bring a truth that even the ancient minds had understood, and we seem to have forgotten. Perhaps the speed of light, the amount of energy, and the size of celestial spheres are all at play in influencing our consciousness. I recommend it to anyone looking for a scientific read that relates biology to the cosmos and draws lessons from history, religion, and mythology. I give it a rating of 4 out of 4 stars.

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Celestial Music
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marba
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Post by marba »

I like the idea of looking for the connection between multiple religions. This review really piqued my interest. Thank you!
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Urvashi Tripathi
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Post by Urvashi Tripathi »

I do believe that numbers have power and has it's own kind of positive vibrations. I do believe in stars too and their dominance in all of our life's. This book would be a great pick for me. Thank you for the beautiful review.
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Eloque3locks
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Post by Eloque3locks »

Numbers are a human attempt to quantify matter but their usage to create parallels between totally different ideologies should make for an interesting read. Great review that makes the book sound riveting
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Edria Dayyinah
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Post by Edria Dayyinah »

how magical this book sounds! the concept of the solar system and brainwaves sounds vague so i am interested in the philosophy of the author’s ideas.
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Aarti Jha
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Post by Aarti Jha »

Attempting to understand and interpret religions from research point of view and not divinity sounds interesting and intriguing. Thank you for presenting your take on this. Well-written review!
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