Official Review: Humanism: The What, Who, Why, When and W...

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Elvis Best
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Official Review: Humanism: The What, Who, Why, When and W...

Post by Elvis Best »

[Following is an official OnlineBookClub.org review of "Humanism: The What, Who, Why, When and Where" by Charles Block.]
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4 out of 4 stars
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Humanism: The What, Who, Why, When and Where, written by Charles Block, is a nonfiction book that takes a deep dive into human history and explores the definition of humanism. In the book, Block provides a comprehensive look at the most important people who promoted the cause of humanism, the reasons behind their actions, and the era and place in which they lived.

At this point, I assume that the reader may be curious about the definition of humanism. Truly, the word sounds fancy, but what does it mean? In my own words, humanism is the ability to see and treat all human beings as equal, regardless of their age, sex, race, sexual orientation, etc. In other words, humanism sees all life as equal and valuable.

Before humanism, there was slavery, dictatorship, terrible quality of living for the majority of the world, and other related ills. However, when the brave men and women of the past saw how unjust the world was, they fought back and took a stand for humanism. Some of them even lost their lives fighting for the good cause. Their fight was not in vain, though, as they kick-started the Renaissance, the Reformation, and the Enlightenment, movements that brought about our modern world and its major benefits. Are you curious about how our modern world came about? You have to read the book to find out.

All in all, I learned so much from this concise book. Indeed, I do not remember the last time I took such detailed notes on a topic as I did on humanism. After reading the book, I now have a deep understanding of terms such as socialism, communism, and capitalism. All these terms have had a huge impact on our world, and I do not even think most people understand them.

Further, the book has inspired in me an appreciation and desire for deeper knowledge about our world and human values. Indeed, It was not so long ago that Blacks were sold as slaves, and women did not have the right to vote. The takeaway here is that our world has come a long way to promote equality and individual freedom, but we still have a long way to go.

Furthermore, if there is one thing I took from the book, it is that the majority of human progress has been pioneered by individuals, not governments or organizations. This may sound far-fetched, but it takes one individual to make a difference in so many lives. If you do not believe me, you should definitely read this book.

Truly, my soul and mind have been enlightened, as I was exposed to many great thinkers. To say that I have been inspired to do and become more is an understatement. Consequently, I rate the book 4 out of 4 stars. There was nothing to dislike about it, and I believe it was exceptionally edited, as I found only one error in it. I would recommend it to anyone who wants to learn about humanism and its impact on our world.

******
Humanism: The What, Who, Why, When and Where
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"People are like stained-glass windows. They sparkle and shine when the sun is out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is a light from within." -Elisabeth Kubler-Ross

Tablito
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Post by Tablito »

Indeed our world has come a long way; if there was a time when women didn't have the right to vote, vying for leadership positions must have been a great deal.

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AnnOgochukwu
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Post by AnnOgochukwu »

As appealing and simple as humanism sounds, it is a concept that demands conscious and persistent effort, which many are not willing to put in. On that note, I remain an admirer of those who have put, and those who are still putting their effort for the promotion equality and individual freedom.
I really enjoyed reading your review, it brought a lot of things to my consciousness. I also like how you expressed your ideas and feelings. Great review.
Live and let live, baby!

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Saint Bruno
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Post by Saint Bruno »

Such an insightful and detailed review from you. I am sure readers will find this book very inspiring. Thanks for the recommendation.

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Olabode Joshua
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Post by Olabode Joshua »

You're on point, man. Going by your words,
Truly, my soul and mind have been enlightened, as I was exposed to many great thinkers.
I believe that every human being that needs enlightenment should read this book. Fantastic Elvis!
Remember, we are passers-by in this realm

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Dominik_G
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Post by Dominik_G »

Humanism: The What, Who, Why, When and Where pretty much sounds like a must-read. Thank you for your insightful review!

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Kevivas03
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Post by Kevivas03 »

This is a pertinent topic especially with what is happening these days with movements such as Black Lives Matter taking to the front. We all need to practice humanism because what makes us beautiful is our differences and not our similarities.

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AbhyarnaAman
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Post by AbhyarnaAman »

Well written review!! I like the topic of the book as well. Also, agree with you- still a long way to go. So many are still fighting for various humanistic rights.
Feeling upset sometimes may be unavoidable, but acting distressed is always optional.
By Rob White

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AbhyarnaAman
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Post by AbhyarnaAman »

AnnOgochukwu wrote:
09 Oct 2020, 03:14
As appealing and simple as humanism sounds, it is a concept that demands conscious and persistent effort, which many are not willing to put in. On that note, I remain an admirer of those who have put, and those who are still putting their effort for the promotion equality and individual freedom.
I really enjoyed reading your review, it brought a lot of things to my consciousness. I also like how you expressed your ideas and feelings. Great review.
Could not agree with you more. I find myself quite naive in these concepts, this book would enlighten me, I believe.
Feeling upset sometimes may be unavoidable, but acting distressed is always optional.
By Rob White

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