Review by Chitsky -- Burn Zones by Jorge P. Newbery

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Chitsky
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Latest Review: Burn Zones by Jorge P. Newbery

Review by Chitsky -- Burn Zones by Jorge P. Newbery

Post by Chitsky »

[Following is a volunteer review of "Burn Zones" by Jorge P. Newbery.]
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4 out of 4 stars
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Burn Zones, defined by the author Jorge P. Newbury as relatively short periods of extraordinary effort that separated the winners and losers, is a book about just that, playing the deck that life deals you, whether good or bad.

It is an autobiography of the life of the author starting from age seven, getting his first dollar delivering newspapers, all the way to his forties, married and running the American Homeowner Preservation.

The book brings to light the life of a man who from a young age had the mind of an entrepreneur always looking for the next hill to climb, the next burn zone to endure. It explains how he started his first business selling ice cream to owning his own record company, from learning how to bike professionally to entering the world of real estate. And as with everything he puts his mind to, he is always tackling new challenges and burn zones with everything he has, giving it his all until the very end.

In Chapter One, he makes a list of his flaws and of his strengths, showing within those first few lines that truly sometimes what you perceive to be your biggest flaws can at the same time be your greatest assets.

“The greatest glory in living lies not in never failing, but in rising every time we fail.”, are words that rang true when Jorge was faced with his greatest challenge yet, the Woodland Meadows apartment community, during his time buying and fixing up apartment complexes. No one could have predicted the whirlwind it would lead to, no one could have predicted it would lead to him losing it all. But he later realizes in the closing chapter of the book when he exclaims:“I am the magic bullet...I was searching for the magic bullet,... in the end,though, the only person who actually did anything for me was me. My magic bullet was not some external person or force. It was me.”

It’s all about pushing yourself to get back on the horse and climbing the next mountain that comes your way. Riding through your life and enduring each burn zone as it comes.

One of the things I liked most was discovering what new venture Jorge was going to go on, feeling like I was along for the ride. The book is also easy to read and reads like a work of fiction, which may attract those who prefer to read them more, making it all the more enjoyable.

I couldn’t find anything I disliked about the book. It was that good, and for these reasons I am rating this book 4 out of 4 stars. I highly recommend this book for people who need a little extra inspiration to get through their own burn zones and also for young people looking to get some motivation.

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Burn Zones
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DBNJ
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Post by DBNJ »

"I am the magic bullet...I was searching for the magic bullet,... in the end,though, the only person who actually did anything for me was me. My magic bullet was not some external person or force. It was me"

This is perfectly true when we think about our lives. Thank for your nice review!
‘In a world that increasingly obsesses over the gods of power, money, and fame, a writer must remain detached, like a bird on a rail, watching, noting, probing, commenting, but never joining. In short, an outsider.”

-Fredrick Forsyth

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