Official Review: Reindeer Don't Fly by Michael Earl Riemer

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Wyland
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Official Review: Reindeer Don't Fly by Michael Earl Riemer

Post by Wyland »

[Following is an official OnlineBookClub.org review of "Reindeer Don't Fly" by Michael Earl Riemer.]
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4 out of 4 stars
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Darwin was not cut out to be a physician, like his father. Instead, he nurtured a desire to please his father for years, somewhat in spite of himself. However, quite by chance, as soon as Captain Fitz Roy offered him an opportunity to tour the world aboard his H. M. S. Beagle, he quit on his father’s dreams. In so doing, Darwin might have brought disgrace to his family; but according to referenced sources contained in Michael Earl Riemer’s book Reindeer Don’t Fly: Exploring the Evidence-Lacking Realm of Evolutionary Philosophy, Charles Darwin was the golden boy whose great mind influenced modern thought.

During his voyage, Darwin spent 5 weeks in the Eastern Pacific Ocean’s Galapagos Islands. Based on the observed physical differences in 13 “species” of finches, Darwin advanced a suggestion that complex organisms have matured gradually over geologic time from simpler ones. As you can imagine, Darwin’s work caused an immediate sensation among scientists, who drew attention to the most foundational issue of creation versus evolution. Why then does Riemer postulate that there are no facts or evidence for evolution? What is the philosophy of Naturalism that hinders an evolutionist from considering Intelligent Design (creationism)?

The above is only part of the numerous questions Riemer tackles effectively in his book. In an animated tone, peppered with humor for effect, Riemer exposes evolution for what it is—a stealth religion based on beliefs and masquerading as science. The first chapter, “How Old is the Earth?”, is especially important as it lays the foundational framework of these two opposing belief systems. Early on in my reading, I was really curious to know why various radiometric techniques can’t be relied upon as dating methods, as often our world is portrayed (erroneously?) as being billions of years old by geologists (evolutionists).

On the other hand, as a parent, my pet subject in this drawn-out “fight for souls” is directed at the manner of indoctrination I witness happening to preschoolers through numerous dinosaur stories or cartoons, and later on, to school-going kids in the form of textbooks with content promoting evolution. As Riemer notes, “a once vibrant devotion to God that had resided within a young child’s heart is educated out of them.” Over time, children find themselves believing in evolutionism which insists on a common ancestry of all organisms, “and out of necessity, that original ancestor was a rock.”

Riemer’s book is non-technical and delivered in a discussion-based format. In addition, it has a lot of reference materials from all sides of the divide, hence, readers will be well equipped to decide for themselves as to their standpoint. Furthermore, to those readers who choose creationism, they will learn to appreciate more the wonders of creation and learn how best to employ the resources designed by God: as an example, I was especially intrigued by the “back to Eden method of organic gardening” practiced by one Paul Gautschi. Based on his method, it doesn’t matter what kind of soil (sandy, rocky, clay, etc.) someone starts with, “within a few years one would be harvesting nutritious produce from those very spots without removing any small rocks or digging the ground first!”

Riemer’s book is well-edited: because I came across a few errors touching on misplaced commas, a wrongly capitalized word, and one instance of mixed tenses in a sentence. For the above-mentioned reasons, I happily recommend the book to Christians, and especially parents, who need materials to rebut the lies that are leveled at them by the adherents of Darwinism. Comparably, the book will build faith in God and answer questions to often difficult but common theological questions. Additionally, secular readers who need insights into agricultural techniques, propagation or philosophy will also find the book worthwhile. Lastly, I rate the book 4 out of 4 stars.

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Reindeer Don't Fly
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ElizaBeth Adams
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Post by ElizaBeth Adams »

This sounds like a wonderful resource. Many people struggle with accepting God, because they feel like their is no scientific basis for the Bible. I hope this book helps get out the message that science and faith can go hand in hand without contradicting one another. Great review!
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Post by Wyland »

ElizaBeth Adams wrote: ↑22 Oct 2019, 05:11 This sounds like a wonderful resource. Many people struggle with accepting God, because they feel like their is no scientific basis for the Bible. I hope this book helps get out the message that science and faith can go hand in hand without contradicting one another. Great review!
Thanks for your wonderful comments. As the author notes, creation and God are not in conflict with science.
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Post by Prisallen »

I think a person can believe in God and evolution at the same time. Maybe that is how God planned to create life to begin with. I remember a science teacher asking the class, when I was in high school, "Why do people assume that if you believe in evolution you don't believe in God?" Anyway, this sounds like an interesting book. Thanks for a wonderful review!
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Post by Miller56 »

Thanks for the review. It sounds like a great book to show both evolution and creation and the believe in God. I belief that although God created us we have evolved over time. I wish schools would not work so hard at trying to convince children that the only answer is scientific.
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Post by Kelyn »

I believe that the 'story' of creation and the science of evolution exist together. But...I'm sorry and apologize in advance. A rock? Seriously? Ask any scientist, including my husband. Not one of them believes that. (And yes, I get that the author was attempting - and failing - to be droll.) To me, it seems like the author is on a "creationist high-horse," and he needs to climb down before he falls off. He's looking down at other people in a way that Christ would NOT have condoned. Again, I apologize. I'll get off my soapbox now before I fall off.
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Post by kandscreeley »

I have to say I'm a bit disappointed. I thought this was going to be a book about Christmas. I don't believe in evolution, and I don't think this is a good fit for me. Thanks, though.
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Post by kdstrack »

It's interesting that the author calls evolution a "stealth religion." Evolutionists are reluctant to admit that evolution is still a "theory." It takes just as much faith to believe evolution as it does to believe in creation - maybe more! I enjoyed your thoughtful comments about the author's premises as presented in the book. Thanks for the great review.
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Post by Bambiears »

This sounds like an amazing book. I will surly be keeping my eyes open for me a copy.

More books like this should be made available. Espeacily when one takes into consideration how much information is shoved at us from the other side.

Thank you for your glowing and thorough reveiw.
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Post by Everydayadventure15 »

The “back to Eden style of organic gardening” sounds very interesting to me. The idea of growing fresh veggies and herbs has appealed to me for a long time but I don’t have any experience with gardening. Thanks for the review!
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Post by Nkoo »

I'm happy that you indicated that the book will help build faith in God. This faith will help dislodge any further confusion surrounding the topic of Creation. Thanks for an insightful review!
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Post by Wyland »

Prisallen wrote: ↑22 Oct 2019, 08:35 I think a person can believe in God and evolution at the same time. Maybe that is how God planned to create life to begin with. I remember a science teacher asking the class, when I was in high school, "Why do people assume that if you believe in evolution you don't believe in God?" Anyway, this sounds like an interesting book. Thanks for a wonderful review!
Thank you for your kind comments!
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Post by Nisha Ward »

I don't know about this one. I think religion and the story of Creation can be reconciled with the theory of evolution and I'm not sure I've heard of many scientists who believe Darwin's work is concrete. And, I mean, I come from a religious region and I've never really seen the two come into conflict. Thanks for the review, though.
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