Is death the only thing guaranteed in our lives?

Use this forum to discuss the July 2021 Book of the month, " Worldlines: A Many Worlds Novel" (Many Worlds, #1)" by Adam Guest
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Anelka ky
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Re: Is death the only thing guaranteed in our lives?

Post by Anelka ky »

Where I am from people actually believe that death is the only thing in life that is set in stone and guaranteed. It's an actual saying taught to young people when teaching about the concept of life and death. Personally, I believe death is not only inevitable but guaranteed for everyone. However, the author does not seem to believe that death is guaranteed and uses the statement to set a tone for the rest of the content.
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Post by Ana Victoria2002 »

Sushan wrote: 01 Jul 2021, 00:17
Death, the only thing in life that is guaranteed. That’s what people say and that’s what we all think. However, what if it isn’t?
(Location 26 of Kindle version)

The author gets a start to his story with the above statement. He says that 'people say so'. Do actually people say like that? Do you too think like that? What is the actual relevance of this statement to this story?
I do not agree fully with this quote. I mean, first you have this entire belief that there is life after death. And even you do not believe on that, the author manages to showcase in his plot how one death may occur in one plot line but not in another, therefore if we believe in the existence of multiple universes and multiple versions of our own self, can we actually say that we die? And even more, can we say that death is permanent?
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Sushan
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Post by Sushan »

kridz21 wrote: 06 Jul 2021, 16:59 I believe that this quote came from Benjamin Franklin. In his actual words, he said that nothing in life is certain except for death and taxes, which is mostly true. However, there are some instances where one would not pay taxes. So overall, I agree in saying that death is the one thing guaranteed in life that is constant for all beings. I think this statement is relevant to provide a hook for the reader and open the story making the reader think.
Thank you for the mentioning of the original saying by Benjamin Franklin. Even one can avoid paying taxes, but no one cannot avoid death (as far as we know). But as per this story even death can be avoided, and you can cheat your own death, giving the subjective experience to others of your death but objectively being born again in a new body but with the same soul
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Sushan
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Post by Sushan »

Kelyn wrote: 07 Jul 2021, 00:01 I've heard it, but a little more 'tongue-in-cheek.' "There are two things in life that are sure: death and taxes." As far as its relevance to the story, it might well not be true if you ascribe to the multiverse theory. We only meet a few Gary's in the book. Who knows how many there really are, living or dead? If there are diverging threads in every multiverse, wouldn't you live on in another (or more) if you died in one? So, as Gary goes on to say, wouldn't that kind of be like living forever? If they all are, for all intents and purposes, 'you,' perhaps death isn't guaranteed after all.
I agree. This quote is true as per the knowledge that we have. But this author takes us to another dimension of knowledge with his theory of quantum immortality and the continuation of your life in this multiverse. So the author has decided to start the book with a common fact and later to disprove it.
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Post by lumenchristi »

People say it a lot. That's not the first time I will hear it. Death is sure the only guaranteed thing after life. No one can escape death as long as you have life. I think it's relevant because the theory of different worldlines is not certain. and if it's true, in all worldlines, all variants are sure to die.
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Post by Sushan »

yomide wrote: 07 Jul 2021, 11:10 Well to answer that question, yes, death is the only thing guaranteed, at least that is what people say. Yes, even if i haven't literally heard it, we all think is. But looking at it the way Prof. Buzzard did, death is the only thing NOT guaranteed. And definitely agree.
I agree. It is a commonly accepted fact though many do not go around reciting that. But in this story Prof. Buzzard (actually the author through this character) makes the reader doubt about the inevitability of death with the theory of quantum immortality. So the ordinary reader who will agree with this sentence at the beginning of the book may have changed his/her mind at the end of the book.
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Post by Sushan »

Urvashi Tripathi wrote: 07 Jul 2021, 14:25 Honestly, I had never heard anyone saying those lines. But I do agree with the statement. We all going to die one day, but each day we get chance to enjoy life, spread love and kindness. I believe there are many more things in life which are guaranteed. As Gary in his dream were committing murder, so I think the statement is relevant with the many world theory and a good start for the book.
Maybe the quote is relevant to the story because it talks about murders and multiple lives in multiple universes. But if this quantum immortality is for real, then how can Gary's victim can be actually dead? Can't it be another subjective experience for Gary and the victim born again in a different body in a different universe?
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Post by Sushan »

Jachike Samuelson wrote: 07 Jul 2021, 17:13
Sushan wrote: 01 Jul 2021, 00:17
Death, the only thing in life that is guaranteed. That’s what people say and that’s what we all think. However, what if it isn’t?
(Location 26 of Kindle version)

The author gets a start to his story with the above statement. He says that 'people say so'. Do actually people say like that? Do you too think like that? What is the actual relevance of this statement to this story?
I agree with the statement but it isn't complete; there are two things guaranteed—life and death. Dying implies there was a "living." It's what happens during living, though, that often times determines how we die, but the "if" we die was already settled before we were born.
Something should exist first and then only it can be vanished. One should live and then only he can die. But this order is challenged in this story. Gary's possible death (subjective experience to his friends) in one universe gave him a life in another universe. So here we see death coming into play before life appears.
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Post by Sushan »

fridamadrid wrote: 07 Jul 2021, 20:17 Death is, in fact, the only thing guaranteed in life. However, I don't think that's something people usually say. Even though I guess we can all agree on it.
According to his theory, after every event in life infinite worldlines are created with all the possibilities of how it could have gone. So, there is always going to be a worldline were you are still living. Like, in some worldlines you will die, but in some you won't, which means we would all be immortal. Nevertheless, I don't think this is too relevant for the development of the story, but it's really cool and crazy to think about it.
I think the statement is very much relevant, as its opposite is proven (fictional theory) in the story. After reading this the easily suggestible ones will actually believe it and think that multiple possibilities of day to day scenarios are running in multiple universes. Even a less suggestible one will think, is death actually guaranteed in our lives? Or is there something more or beyond that?
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Post by Sushan »

Joseph Dunn wrote: 08 Jul 2021, 10:34 I don't recall ever hearing anyone say this, but in this context, it adds emphasis to the author's proposal that death may be avoided. I find it intriguing as an opening line.
People do not commonly say this, but many believe this and many would agree with it upon hearing it. As I see, the author has just stated a common fact at the beginning of his book and then woven a story which challenges that fact. So, yes, it is intriguing as an opening line.
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Post by Sushan »

Judy_Jemutai7 wrote: 08 Jul 2021, 12:54 This statement is not entirely true because death is a possibility but as long as we have life, we are guaranteed of seeing the next day. Death is not a guarantee, it is a one time thing but we have life on a daily basis. It is not relevant to the story.
I disagree. It is true that we have our lives and experience it on a daily basis. But no one can be certain about the coming second, the coming moment. You can be gone from this world at any second by any mean. But here the author shows that death is not an end, but a beginning for different possibilities. So though you are dead in current universe, you may have lived longer, or sometimes even forever in some other universe.
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Post by Sushan »

Caroline81 wrote: 08 Jul 2021, 14:26 Yes, people say that and is evident by how they try to make the most of life and i agree with it because there are many possibilities in life but death is inevitable. In relation to the story, its irrelevant with Gary being able to exist in different worldlines.
I agree. People do various things and try to fulfill various ambitions as they know that death is inevitable and life is short. But what if this quantum immortality is true? Then you won't have to be worried about time being short. Most importantly you do not have to worry in making choices, because in some other universe you will get the opportunity to make a different choice and have a different experience. I see this as a wonderful theory.
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Post by Clifford Munene »

Well I think some people say so though am not sure that death is the only guaranteed thing in life.for starters,you actually have to be born and live so you can die.can I also say we are guaranteed a birth and life as humans?
We see people die in the story especially those dying young so I this think the author wanted to make a remote connection to this
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Post by Sushan »

Benaron wrote: 08 Jul 2021, 16:27 I remember reading this in the earlier part of the book, and I think it's mostly something that the author just wrote to build up suspense in the plot. However, I have heard a joke about the subject: "only two things in life are certain- death, and taxes".
Maybe the author was not much serious about this statement and merely included it to arouse suspension. And I think in that aspect the author did a good job. Any reader who start to read this story will prepare his/her mind for something dark and related to death.
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Post by yomide »

Anelka ky wrote: 19 Jul 2021, 05:32 Where I am from people actually believe that death is the only thing in life that is set in stone and guaranteed. It's an actual saying taught to young people when teaching about the concept of life and death. Personally, I believe death is not only inevitable but guaranteed for everyone. However, the author does not seem to believe that death is guaranteed and uses the statement to set a tone for the rest of the content.
Agreed. Adam seem to argue the opposite. Death isn't guaranteed? Man if it isn't I would live like a god. But everyone knows death is an everyday thing. It is very much guaranteed. In fact, it is inevitably guaranteed.
There is no point in trying to please a person who doesn't apreciate me. Besides, why do I have to try and please anyone in the first place?
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