What do you think about the use of medical jargon?

Use this forum to discuss the May 2021 Book of the month, "Surviving the Business of Healthcare: Knowledge is Power" by Barbara Galutia Regis PA-C
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Sushan
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What do you think about the use of medical jargon?

Post by Sushan »

The author has gone to the extent of describing, at the very beginning of the book, she being diagnosed with a cancer, the tests that were done, the procedures and their results, the names of medications, etc. Is it a good thing to include that much technical content in a book which is intended for non-medical personnel?
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Post by Bookreviewer71 »

It is not wrong to go into details as people with similar conditions can relate to it. The author promptly states she wants to be an influencer for change. When someone like her in the medical profession couldn't foresee health expenses, general citizens can take her example and be prepared. The author's decision to go into immunotherapy as a preventive measure shows her strong will to fight till the end.
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Post by leaana »

I like the author's concept; it has the potential to educate non-medical readers about cancer's true nature. Actually, it's quite interesting because some people can relate to her story, and the medical jargon can add to the book's overall appeal especially because its a part of the beginning of the book. This women is a positive role model for society.
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Post by Sushan »

Bookreviewer71 wrote: 01 Jun 2021, 02:54 It is not wrong to go into details as people with similar conditions can relate to it. The author promptly states she wants to be an influencer for change. When someone like her in the medical profession couldn't foresee health expenses, general citizens can take her example and be prepared. The author's decision to go into immunotherapy as a preventive measure shows her strong will to fight till the end.
She has gone to an extreme of trying a research level method to try out her luck for living. It is a strong way to face such a dilemma. It gives a strong message to anyone who is struggling with any medical condition.

Yet, I am not sure how common population will grasp each and every idea of this book because in some areas it is quite heavy with technical words, with which the common people are unaware of.
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Post by Sushan »

leaana wrote: 01 Jun 2021, 04:20 I like the author's concept; it has the potential to educate non-medical readers about cancer's true nature. Actually, it's quite interesting because some people can relate to her story, and the medical jargon can add to the book's overall appeal especially because its a part of the beginning of the book. This women is a positive role model for society.
Yes, the in detail description regarding the diagnosis of her illness and the various treatment options she tried will help a person in a similar condition to relate it easily, or even to get some help to plan for future tests and medication. But I do not think using too much medical content is suitable in a book which is intended for common people because the readers might find it quite difficult to keep up with the technical content.
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Post by Buk Nerd »

I believe the author’s intention is to be as detailed as possible so that anyone who is or who finds themselves in a similar situation can relate to her experience. I don't think including all that technical content is bad at all.
"Literature is the most agreeable way of ignoring life." - Fernando Pessoa :techie-studyinggray:
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Post by Sushan »

Buk Nerd wrote: 01 Jun 2021, 09:55 I believe the author’s intention is to be as detailed as possible so that anyone who is or who finds themselves in a similar situation can relate to her experience. I don't think including all that technical content is bad at all.
Information is good. As she has mentioned in the book title, knowledge is 'the' power. Yet, is it practical and also useful to fill up a person with tons of data expecting that it will make him much more knowledgeable. Couldn't it have been better if the author stated the basic details and mentioned some reference for the ones who are interested in additional details?
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Post by El_limitless »

It's not entirely out of place to do that. It's a book anchored on medical health, and there's really no realistic way the author could have avoided the use of medical jargons entirely. So the usage for me isn't a lot to handle.
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Post by gabrielletiemi »

I also thought that there were a lot of medical terms in this book, even though the focus seems to be to help people from outside the medical field to understand the healthcare system. I think that the author could have avoided some jargon used, but there were still some that couldn't be substituted.
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Post by gabrielletiemi »

Bookreviewer71 wrote: 01 Jun 2021, 02:54 It is not wrong to go into details as people with similar conditions can relate to it. The author promptly states she wants to be an influencer for change. When someone like her in the medical profession couldn't foresee health expenses, general citizens can take her example and be prepared. The author's decision to go into immunotherapy as a preventive measure shows her strong will to fight till the end.
That's an interesting point, I didn't think about how people with similar diseases might relate to the author's story, it really makes sense that the author also introduces her life experiences from the start. It might indeed be helpful to everyone to prepare for situations when we need to use the healthcare system.
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Post by gabrielletiemi »

leaana wrote: 01 Jun 2021, 04:20 I like the author's concept; it has the potential to educate non-medical readers about cancer's true nature. Actually, it's quite interesting because some people can relate to her story, and the medical jargon can add to the book's overall appeal especially because its a part of the beginning of the book. This women is a positive role model for society.
It's true that the medical jargon used by the author might be helpful to educate the general public, but I also think that since this book focuses on helping people to understand the healthcare system, especially in the US, it might end up interfering in the understanding of the totality of the work. However, I agree with you when you said that the author is a role model for society.
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Post by gabrielletiemi »

Buk Nerd wrote: 01 Jun 2021, 09:55 I believe the author’s intention is to be as detailed as possible so that anyone who is or who finds themselves in a similar situation can relate to her experience. I don't think including all that technical content is bad at all.
Now I see that it might also be the author's intention to make the book more relatable, but I think that still some medical terms could have been avoided or, at least, better explained to the general public or explained with simple words when possible too.
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Post by gabrielletiemi »

El_limitless wrote: 01 Jun 2021, 10:52 It's not entirely out of place to do that. It's a book anchored on medical health, and there's really no realistic way the author could have avoided the use of medical jargons entirely. So the usage for me isn't a lot to handle.
It's indeed a book that brings the medical field so there are some terms that the author couldn't indeed avoid, but I think they could be better explained or substituted by other terms too. Maybe it's something more personal since I found it difficult to understand some words than others, but it's something to think about too because this is a great book and the usage of medical jargon won't change it to me.
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Post by sssns »

I think technical terms are inevitable in this kind of book. Also, the objective is to promote awareness and increase knowledge, so the details are important. A glossary, footnotes or end notes will be helpful in organizing the additional information or documentation supporting the technical terms. The references will also be a useful for those interested to do further research.
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Post by MBerretta »

I personally love medical jargon. I love reading medical books and medical nonfiction but I've also got a degree in biology focusing mainly on biomedical/biotechnology and have worked in medicine for 7 years
"I want to learn everything I can, and I write down everything I see. Golly says if I want to be a writer someday, I better start now, and that is why I am a spy."

-Harriet M. Welsch (Harriet the Spy, 1996)
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