Recommendations of Classic Books

Please use this sub-forum to discuss any classic books or any very old fiction books or series.
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You must limit each topic thread in this section to only one book or only one series. Make the title of the topic the name of the book, and if possible also include the author's name. If you want to allow spoilers, you must include the word spoilers in the title of the topic, otherwise spoilers are prohibited.
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Bookworm2011
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Post by Bookworm2011 » 31 Aug 2011, 13:38

I just finished reading The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins. I found the book intriguing. I found that this he did a good job building up the mystery behind the characters. I enjoy how the book is written in the views of many characters and that as a reader all the reasons behind the actions are explained. In many mystery books I feel like I am left with questions still but with this book I found that everything was answered. I would definitely recommend this book.

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Fran
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Post by Fran » 31 Aug 2011, 13:43

Bookworm2011 wrote:I just finished reading The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins. I found the book intriguing. I found that this he did a good job building up the mystery behind the characters. I enjoy how the book is written in the views of many characters and that as a reader all the reasons behind the actions are explained. In many mystery books I feel like I am left with questions still but with this book I found that everything was answered. I would definitely recommend this book.
'The Moonstone' is also a terrific read if you are interested.
We fade away, but vivid in our eyes
A world is born again that never dies.
- My Home by Clive James

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Bighuey
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Post by Bighuey » 31 Aug 2011, 17:03

Fran wrote:
Bookworm2011 wrote:I just finished reading The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins. I found the book intriguing. I found that this he did a good job building up the mystery behind the characters. I enjoy how the book is written in the views of many characters and that as a reader all the reasons behind the actions are explained. In many mystery books I feel like I am left with questions still but with this book I found that everything was answered. I would definitely recommend this book.
'The Moonstone' is also a terrific read if you are interested.
Another one of Collins that was good was the one about the blind guy and his wife who were broke, living with relatives, and his wife talked him into writing his experiences as some kind of a traveling salesman into a book. wish I could remember the name of it, I read it about 40 years ago and I remember I really liked it. Please help me on this one if you can, I would like to find a copy of it.

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Post by Jacksville » 02 Sep 2011, 23:56

hi
i really dont come under this category, sorry.

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Maud Fitch
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Post by Maud Fitch » 03 Sep 2011, 04:03

Bighuey wrote:Another one of Collins that was good was the one about the blind guy and his wife who were broke, living with relatives, and his wife talked him into writing his experiences as some kind of a traveling salesman into a book. wish I could remember the name of it, I read it about 40 years ago and I remember I really liked it. Please help me on this one if you can, I would like to find a copy of it.
Wilkie Collins suffered with severe eye problems all his life so it was probably natural that blindness featured in his writings. He wrote three stories which featured a blind protagonist but none of them seem to match up with your synopsis. As Fran said, "The Moonstone" is great and it was the forerunner of the modern detective story.
"Every story has three sides to it - yours, mine and the facts" Foster Meharny Russell

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Bighuey
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Post by Bighuey » 03 Sep 2011, 09:28

Maud Fitch wrote:
Bighuey wrote:Another one of Collins that was good was the one about the blind guy and his wife who were broke, living with relatives, and his wife talked him into writing his experiences as some kind of a traveling salesman into a book. wish I could remember the name of it, I read it about 40 years ago and I remember I really liked it. Please help me on this one if you can, I would like to find a copy of it.
Wilkie Collins suffered with severe eye problems all his life so it was probably natural that blindness featured in his writings. He wrote three stories which featured a blind protagonist but none of them seem to match up with your synopsis. As Fran said, "The Moonstone" is great and it was the forerunner of the modern detective story.
I found the Collins book that I mentioned on the internet. Should have thought of that before. Its called After Dark and its a collection of stories that are more or less connected, The guy was some kind of a traveling salesman before he lost his sight and had a lot of strange experences. His wife talks him into putting them into book form and as I remember, he becomes a very succesful writer. It could be about Collins own life. I found it in ebook, I think Ill start reading it next.

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Fran
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Post by Fran » 03 Sep 2011, 12:31

Bighuey wrote:
Maud Fitch wrote:
Bighuey wrote:Another one of Collins that was good was the one about the blind guy and his wife who were broke, living with relatives, and his wife talked him into writing his experiences as some kind of a traveling salesman into a book. wish I could remember the name of it, I read it about 40 years ago and I remember I really liked it. Please help me on this one if you can, I would like to find a copy of it.
Wilkie Collins suffered with severe eye problems all his life so it was probably natural that blindness featured in his writings. He wrote three stories which featured a blind protagonist but none of them seem to match up with your synopsis. As Fran said, "The Moonstone" is great and it was the forerunner of the modern detective story.
I found the Collins book that I mentioned on the internet. Should have thought of that before. Its called After Dark and its a collection of stories that are more or less connected, The guy was some kind of a traveling salesman before he lost his sight and had a lot of strange experences. His wife talks him into putting them into book form and as I remember, he becomes a very succesful writer. It could be about Collins own life. I found it in ebook, I think Ill start reading it next.
I must look for that one ... his books are out of copyright so you can download them for free for the Kindle.
We fade away, but vivid in our eyes
A world is born again that never dies.
- My Home by Clive James

Bookworm2011
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Post by Bookworm2011 » 03 Sep 2011, 12:38

Thanks for the suggestions, I'm going to have to look for them as well for the Kindle... I can't wait to read more of his stuff :D

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Post by Ghastlies » 07 Sep 2011, 09:32

the hunchback of notre dame would have to be one of the most exciting and humourous books i've ever come across. i like how the views of each character toward an event is given a lot of importance and the changes in perspectives adds to the excitement that is built up throughout the progression of the story. i still can't get over this book after reading it a few weeks ago. i've even already started on another one and i still feel as if i should read it again lol.

classical books are beyond awesome.

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Post by [Pple_27] » 06 Oct 2011, 08:33

yes,,you are right guys,,,i really appreciate your comments...

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Post by mouseofcards89 » 23 Dec 2011, 13:41

Amazon is selling Dostoevsky's life's work in Kindle format for $2.99. This alone is well worth the price of the e-reader, if you don't own one already. It includes all of the major novels, all of the short stories, the letters, and several critiques of his work (two of the 'reviewers' are idiots, but one or two of them make some decent observations). The only downside is that you're getting Constance Garnett translations rather than Pevear/Volkhonsky ones.
For that matter, you can get most of the notable works of Russia's literary golden age for under $10 on Amazon.
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Post by Zepher07 » 27 Dec 2011, 15:07

FRANKENSTEIN By Mary Shelly

I would have to recommend Frankenstein by Mary Shelly. It is nothing near what Hollywood has turned it into. It is intelligent and the languange she uses is brilliant. The monster's story is much more complex than the movie's would have you believe. Mary Shelly came up with the idea after a spending a holiday in which Lord Byron challenged her and the others who were with them to create a ghost story. Instead of going the usual spirit route she comes up with a scientist trying to reanimate the dead. Brilliant! I highly recommend it.

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Post by Bighuey » 27 Dec 2011, 20:06

Speaking of Frankenstein, another great classic is Dracula. Like Frankenstein, none of the movies even compare to it. Jack Palance made a version some years ago that wasnt too bad, but even that one was nowhere as good as the book.
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Post by ThrivingDad » 05 Jan 2012, 13:31

I would totally recommend Madam Bovary by Gustave Flaubert. It's is a masterpiece of realism in the 19th century.

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Post by jcitroen » 25 Jan 2012, 16:50

Has anyone read 'Cold Comfort Farm' by Stella Gibbons? It's truly a classic and an absolute must on your reading list. I started reading out this parody of British rural life and initially wondered 'what on earth am I reading?' However, as the humour and wit quickly grabbed my attention, I started turning the pages faster and faster, laughing all the while. Now with only 17% to go, I'm fearful that any book following this one will pale in comparison.

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