Emma (spoilers)

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stoppoppingtheP
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Re: Emma (spoilers)

Post by stoppoppingtheP » 24 Jun 2014, 09:56

gali wrote:I loved all of Austin books and especially her "pride and prejudice" which is her best in my opinion. Emma has many deep flaws, but she is really a deeply caring person and means well. I think one either likes her or hates her.

I agree, I enjoyed the book Emma, but I didn't like the character itself.

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Post by quill_begotten » 04 Jul 2014, 10:12

Sott9 wrote:I don't think Emma is my favorite Jane Austen book, although the movie version with Gwyneth Paltrow is pretty fantastic. Those who aren't crazy about the book - what do you think about that film adaptation?
This was my favorite movie for a while but after watching it again recently I realized the only reason I must've liked it so much was because of Mr. Knightley's character and the humor (which was much more present in the book.) I disliked Emma even more in the movie and I thought Gwyneth Paltrow definitely portrayed her as a selfish person, to put things lightly. I didn't realize there were other versions, I'm interested to see them now!
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Post by GeraldineMcClintock » 04 Jul 2014, 15:47

I love all the classic authors and stories but, 'Emma' is one of the best. The character of 'Emma' is flawed like all human beings are. She tries to do her best to help a dear friend but, her attempts are flawed because she's always thinking from her view of the world she lives in and her ideas of what she thinks would be best for her friend, without think of what her friend's desires.

Austen cleverly writer's about the human flaws we all share because, most of us at one time or another tries to help a family member or friend based on what we believe is best for the individual, instead of what the individual thinks what would be best for them. Perhaps that's why 'Emma's' flaws irk us so much.

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Post by mandap24 » 06 Jul 2014, 23:43

GeraldineMcClintock wrote:I love all the classic authors and stories but, 'Emma' is one of the best. The character of 'Emma' is flawed like all human beings are. She tries to do her best to help a dear friend but, her attempts are flawed because she's always thinking from her view of the world she lives in and her ideas of what she thinks would be best for her friend, without think of what her friend's desires.

Austen cleverly writer's about the human flaws we all share because, most of us at one time or another tries to help a family member or friend based on what we believe is best for the individual, instead of what the individual thinks what would be best for them. Perhaps that's why 'Emma's' flaws irk us so much.
I think you make a great point on the character of Emma, she is very real and many people have tried to play matchmaker or intervene with the best of intentions not seeing what truly makes their friend happy.

I enjoyed Emma a lot and actually read through it really fast because I enjoyed it so much, it's not my favorite by Austen but I thought it was a great story.

I must say at one point I was confused because reading it I realized I'd experienced this story before and I knew some things that were going to happen. It was about halfway through the book that I realized it was because I've watched the movie Clueless so many times and it's a modern telling of the book Emma. There are obvious differences but the story is still the same. It's possible because I had that basis that it was more enjoyable? I won't ever be sure but I know I have loved everything Austen has written.
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Post by Gemini Gal » 25 Jul 2014, 21:56

I would call it a satire because Jane Austen was obviously vary intelligent and loved to poke fun very subtly. We know that things were different in her day but I think she enjoyed making fun of silly people by illustrating their silliness in her stories. I also think there were hints of this: remember when Emma attacks the poor woman (verbally, of course) at the picnic and Mr. Knightly calls her on it? It causes them to quarrel and Emma learns to be kinder. I think that the point of the stories was to point out these things in a way that everyone could learn from. I only wish that Jane had written more books! I adored Gwyneth Paltro in Emma and felt it was a great cast and they brought the story to life.

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Post by Nina1703 » 25 Jul 2014, 23:01

I like Emma because of the fact that she has flaws. The story takes an immature and narcissistic young lady with silly views of marriage, love, and people to one who finally realises she was wrong. She isn't very likeable like many of Jane Austen's other characters, but she is still pretty relatable. The only book from Jane Austen's books that I struggle to read is Sense and Sensibility. I love the movie and think its great, but the book is so dry.

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Post by PetalsOpenToTheMoon » 04 Aug 2014, 15:43

Emma was the first book by Jane Austin that I ever read. it was a good introduction to her writing styles and her witty humor, but after reading some of her other books, such as Pride and Prejudice, I find that Emma was lacking a very deep ,well thought out, story line. I still like the book though, and recommend it to others.

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Post by mikesx50 » 29 Aug 2014, 10:33

I have just finished reading Emma. I retired last October and was determined to read some classics. To date I've read 16. I struggled initially with Emma and almost gave up, I am so glad I didn't. Truthfully it took me a while to "get it". Indeed it took me 3 weeks to read the first half of the book and 3 days to finish it. The highlights for me were Emma's reaction when Knightley points out how rude she has been to Miss Bates and when Emma realises she is in love with Knightley.

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Post by cjmayes118 » 02 Sep 2014, 17:50

This is actually one of my favorite Jane Austen books because Emma is not afraid to speak her mind. In typical female fashion, she changes her mind by the end of the book about her views of marriage. I love her witty comments at times and how she speaks the truth with such politeness that others sometimes do not know whether to be offended or just stay silent. It did take me a while to get in to the book and start enjoying it, but by the end, I was hooked.

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Post by Radhika_17 » 05 Oct 2014, 09:07

Emma was a strange story in my opinion. Although, I love Jane's every single book but Emma would be the last in the list. It's really very difficult to keep reading the book at times because it gets so boring. The exciting part is so little. But since it's Jane Austen's book, being a little partial, I still love it! :D

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Post by LivreAmour217 » 04 Nov 2014, 11:09

I liked Emma, and I didn't mind the character title at all. Her behavior is the direct result of her priviledged upbringing, and should come as no surprise. Yes, her know-it-all attitude can be annoying, but her intentions are good, and she does learn from her mishaps. Like many others who have already posted, I appreciated Emma's flaws and feel that they made her more realistic.
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Post by boireannach » 08 Nov 2014, 08:19

I find that with historical novels, such as those written by Austen, are sometimes difficult to relate to when it comes to specific characters. Mostly I think this is because we are at such a different place in society that we cannot fully comprehend what life was like for these people. I do think, however, that the books written by Austen allow us more gleanings of true societal norms of her day than any other author. I thoroughly enjoy the characters that we are handed and the lives that we are thrown in when we read Austen. I think she does a brilliant job of building a story regardless of the characters themselves. On that same note, I tend to enjoy the characters as a general rule, as I think they are very real and that Austen's intent was to write people as they really are (flaws included) and I think she did so fantastically. I can understand that they can be more difficult to relate to than most, but I still think she did a wonderful job capturing the spirit of her characters and giving us generally good reads.

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Post by gali » 08 Nov 2014, 09:06

Have you heard of the modern retellings of Emma by Alexander McCall Smith? It has just come out and I plan to give it a try.
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Post by Redlegs » 22 Nov 2014, 01:23

Emma is one of four Jane Austen books I have read and ranks equally with Mansfield Park and just after Pride and Prejudice.

Yes, Emma is a bit silly, something of a ditz, but, as someone else has pointed out, it is the most comedic of Austen's books. It really is just a bit of fun and shouldn't be taken too seriously.
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Post by ananya92 » 06 Jan 2015, 01:59

I think compared to the rest of the characters in Austen's repertoire, Emma does seem quite silly and vain, but I think her character is quite realistic. I think the silly characters of this book is what makes the book quite amusing for the reader.

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